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BUSINESS
February 27, 1998
El Segundo-based Computer Sciences Corp.'s board will meet today, its first session on how it will advise shareholders to respond to Computer Associates International Inc.'s $9.8-billion hostile takeover bid. CSC rejected the bid last week, prompting Computer Associates to begin a tender offer. CSC contends the price is too low and the combination would hurt business. Computer Associates has been courting CSC investors. CSC's board said it expects to disclose its recommendation by Monday.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
March 1, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Computer Sciences Corp. said it planned to restate more than a decade of results by about $59 million to account for expenses from options grant backdating. An internal probe found employees didn't intentionally date grants to when the company's stock traded lower, inflating their value, El Segundo-based Computer Sciences said. The company hasn't filed financial statements for the last two quarters because of the probe.
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BUSINESS
February 13, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office granted $541 million in contracts to Lockheed Martin Corp. and El Segundo-based Computer Sciences Corp. to help the agency upgrade its computer operations over the next eight years. Bethesda, Md.-based Lockheed Martin's contract was valued at $254 million and Computer Sciences' at $287 million. The agency said the contracts are the largest in its history.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 10 years and billions of dollars in failed efforts, the gargantuan task of overhauling the computer systems at the Internal Revenue Service landed Wednesday in the lap of Computer Sciences Corp. In turning the job over to the private sector, the federal tax agency is opening a new chapter in its long struggle to bring taxpayers modern conveniences ranging from personalized customer service to the ability to file tax returns via the Internet.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1985
The El Segundo-based company will supply and operate a consolidated data network for the U.S. Customs Service. The contract, which is the largest in the company's history, has an initial value of $48.5 million and could be worth $282 million over eight years if all options are exercised. The network could be expanded to include certain operations of the Internal Revenue Service and a number of other operations of the Treasury Department.
BUSINESS
March 1, 2007 | From Bloomberg News
Computer Sciences Corp. said it planned to restate more than a decade of results by about $59 million to account for expenses from options grant backdating. An internal probe found employees didn't intentionally date grants to when the company's stock traded lower, inflating their value, El Segundo-based Computer Sciences said. The company hasn't filed financial statements for the last two quarters because of the probe.
BUSINESS
December 10, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 10 years and billions of dollars in failed efforts, the gargantuan task of overhauling the computer systems at the Internal Revenue Service landed Wednesday in the lap of Computer Sciences Corp. In turning the job over to the private sector, the federal tax agency is opening a new chapter in its long struggle to bring taxpayers modern conveniences ranging from personalized customer service to the ability to file tax returns via the Internet.
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Environmental Protection Agency unduly relies on an outside contractor for a wide variety of management-support services, making the agency increasingly vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse and illegal practices, an internal EPA audit said Friday. The agency's inspector general said in a report that his investigators have identified more than $13 million in questionable payments to the contractor, Computer Sciences Corp. of El Segundo, Calif.
WORLD
December 24, 2004 | From Bloomberg News
At least 181 U.S. contractors have died this year in Iraq, and more than half worked for Titan Corp., Halliburton Co. or Computer Science Corp.'s DynCorp Technical Services unit, according to U.S. Labor Department data. The number of contractor personnel deaths contrasts with 23 deaths in 2003. It doesn't include the four Halliburton employees who were killed this week in an attack on a U.S. base near Mosul, in northern Iraq.
BUSINESS
August 29, 2000
Paul N. Blumberg and Wilford D. Godbold Jr. have been elected to the board of directors of Ceradyne Inc. in Costa Mesa. Blumberg is director of the Chemical and Physical Sciences Laboratory, Ford Research Laboratory. Godbold, currently a private investor, was president and chief executive of Zero Corp. * Harold Fox has been appointed chief financial officer of Western Dental Services in Orange. He previously spent seven years as chief financial officer for RJME Inc.
BUSINESS
February 27, 1998
El Segundo-based Computer Sciences Corp.'s board will meet today, its first session on how it will advise shareholders to respond to Computer Associates International Inc.'s $9.8-billion hostile takeover bid. CSC rejected the bid last week, prompting Computer Associates to begin a tender offer. CSC contends the price is too low and the combination would hurt business. Computer Associates has been courting CSC investors. CSC's board said it expects to disclose its recommendation by Monday.
BUSINESS
February 13, 1997 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
The U.S. Patent and Trademark Office granted $541 million in contracts to Lockheed Martin Corp. and El Segundo-based Computer Sciences Corp. to help the agency upgrade its computer operations over the next eight years. Bethesda, Md.-based Lockheed Martin's contract was valued at $254 million and Computer Sciences' at $287 million. The agency said the contracts are the largest in its history.
NEWS
February 29, 1992 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Environmental Protection Agency unduly relies on an outside contractor for a wide variety of management-support services, making the agency increasingly vulnerable to fraud, waste, abuse and illegal practices, an internal EPA audit said Friday. The agency's inspector general said in a report that his investigators have identified more than $13 million in questionable payments to the contractor, Computer Sciences Corp. of El Segundo, Calif.
BUSINESS
August 16, 1985
The El Segundo-based company will supply and operate a consolidated data network for the U.S. Customs Service. The contract, which is the largest in the company's history, has an initial value of $48.5 million and could be worth $282 million over eight years if all options are exercised. The network could be expanded to include certain operations of the Internal Revenue Service and a number of other operations of the Treasury Department.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1986 | JERRY BELCHER, Times Staff Writer
A lone, publicity-shy Los Angeles eye surgeon provided the first warning that an embarrassing computer glitch had resulted in state Medi-Cal overpayments of up to $1 million to Southern California ophthalmologists. The doctor said his records indicated that he had received about $15,000 in payments from Medi-Cal for outpatient cataract surgeries that had already been paid in full by Medicare. He asked that his name not be mentioned. "I am just a good citizen," he said.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Boeing Co.'s profit on its contract to manage development of the Army's Future Combat System of armored vehicles and drones will be more closely tied to performance, the program's manager said. Boeing's base fee will now be 3% of the $21-billion contract, down from 10%, and its potential "award fee" or bonus will rise to 12% from 5%, Brig. Gen. Charles Cartwright said. The amount of money available for bonus and the goals to which it is tied are still under negotiation, he said.
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