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Computer Security

OPINION
April 11, 2013 | By Peter Reiher
North Korea recently launched a cyber attack on South Korean TV stations and banks. Iran carried out a cyber campaign against U.S. banking sites. The U.S. and Israel released malware that disabled Iranian nuclear centrifuges. Or did they? There's no doubt someone did all these things, and there are reasons to believe that those suspected are responsible. But because of the way the Internet is designed and the poor general state of computer security, it is extremely difficult to pinpoint an attack's origin.
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BUSINESS
August 26, 2003 | From Bloomberg News
The Royal Canadian Mounted Police said Monday that it was investigating whether the Sobig.F computer virus that flooded computer networks with millions of unwanted e-mails last week originated from a computer in Canada. Sobig.F is the fastest-spreading computer virus of its kind, computer-security experts have said. Companies including FedEx Corp., Starbucks Corp. and AOL Time Warner Inc.
BUSINESS
January 29, 2002 | Bloomberg News
A new computer virus that poses as a link to digital photos on the Internet probably will be contained within a few days, a computer security expert said. The virus, dubbed "MyParty .Worm," first appeared Saturday, said Vincent Weafer, a researcher with computer software maker Symantec Corp. The virus comes in an e-mail containing what looks like a link to photos from a recent party on a Yahoo Inc. Web site.
BUSINESS
September 25, 2012 | By E. Scott Reckard
A day of disruptions in Wells Fargo & Co.'s electronic banking operations apparently was the latest in a series of cyber attacks that disrupted online operations at Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. A computer security expert blamed massive denial of service attacks, in which perpetrators overwhelm computer servers with communications demands, causing networks to seize up or slow down. In a posting at Pastebin.com, a group calling itself the Izz al-Din al-Qassam Cyber Fighters claimed responsibility for last week's outages at Bank of America, Citi, and JPMorgan before hitting Wells Fargo.
BUSINESS
July 13, 2000 | From Associated Press
A notorious computer hacker who led the FBI on a three-year manhunt while allegedly causing millions of dollars in damage to technology companies now has federal permission to pursue work as a computer consultant or online writer. It's a "180-degree change" in the restrictions previously enforced by Kevin Mitnick's probation officer, Mitnick attorney Donald Randolph said Wednesday.
BUSINESS
March 25, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
The Securities and Exchange Commission's computer security system has weak controls that put financial information and other data at risk of being stolen, a congressional watchdog agency said Thursday. The Government Accountability Office faulted the SEC for leaving computers logged on in public areas, not protecting passwords and not removing access for terminated employees for as long as eight months.
BUSINESS
August 25, 2003 | From Reuters
The fast-spreading SoBig.F e-mail virus slowed Sunday and failed for a second time to launch a remote data attack using thousands of infected personal computers, computer security experts said. SoBig.F, which emerged Aug. 18, was programmed to unleash a data attack at noon PDT Sunday. But the trigger -- a computer program unwittingly installed on 20 poorly defended computers mostly in the United States and Canada -- was deactivated Friday.
BUSINESS
November 20, 1987 | DAVID OLMOS, Times Staff Writer
Robert W. Herman can sympathize with companies that make automobile air bags--one of those sure-fire products of the future that deflated somewhere along the road. Herman, one of Orange County's high-tech pioneers and founder of Codercard, a tiny Irvine company that makes computer security cards, has been waiting--and waiting--for his firm's products to find a market. Unlike those unlucky makers of air bags, however, Herman may be nearly through waiting.
OPINION
November 19, 2012
The Israeli company Seculert offers a service that identifies malware-infected computers without requiring its customers to install any new equipment or software. According to Aviv Raff, the company's co-founder, Seculert deliberately exposes its own computers to malware in order to become part of the chain of virus-infected computers that cyber criminals are assembling around the Internet. By analyzing the communications on these "botnets," Seculert can identify computers on its customers' networks that have been infected.
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