Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsComputer Services Industry
IN THE NEWS

Computer Services Industry

FEATURED ARTICLES
BUSINESS
May 29, 2000 | ELIZABETH DOUGLASS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A new wave of companies is steadily staking claim to a piece of the communications future. For now, these promising firms are mostly hidden among a glut of "dot-com" ventures. That obscurity, however, is not likely to last. That's because this group of companies is harnessing the power of next-generation networks that carry phone and Internet traffic together, making possible a host of new services that combine the strengths of both phones and computers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
BUSINESS
February 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Intel Corp. plans to spend $1 billion to $1.5 billion to overhaul its semiconductor production facility in New Mexico to manufacture computer chips with next-generation technology. The Rio Rancho factory is expected to begin producing 45-nanometer chips -- meaning they will have features as tiny as 45-billionths of a meter -- in the second half of 2008, Intel said Monday. The transistors on such chips are so small that more than 30 million can fit onto the head of a pin.
Advertisement
NEWS
October 1, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
At age 26, Aaron Bunnell was riding the fastest wave of the New Economy. The son of a technology media baron, Bunnell propelled the fledgling Web site Upside.com into a daily hot spot for Internet news, and pulled all-nighters pumped with caffeine and uppers. When he wasn't working 100-hour weeks, he was partying with Silicon Valley's elite at digerati events, scattered across the sprawling haze of new money in Northern California.
BUSINESS
February 21, 2007 | From Reuters
The U.S. semiconductor industry appears to have worked through an inventory glut that had hurt fourth-quarter earnings and sent shares tumbling. Analysts said they expected shares of companies that make microchips to rise in the coming months as orders increased from customers that were using up inventory in the fourth quarter.
BUSINESS
December 12, 2002 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Hewlett-Packard Co. plans to announce a contract today with El Segundo-based DirecTV that HP hopes will help its managed services business grow at twice the rate of the industry as a whole. Under the deal, worth hundreds of millions of dollars, Palo Alto-based HP will supply and manage the satellite television provider's billing infrastructure for five years.
BUSINESS
February 22, 1999 | GARY CHAPMAN
The Internet is everywhere in Singapore--on billboards, television, in the newspapers, in the mouths and minds of government officials and businesspeople, even in ads on taxis and buses. This country is betting its future on the Internet. Its ambitious plans, and its formidable capabilities, are likely to soon make it the world's most wired nation. Indeed, Singapore is poised to become the world's first true "digital nation."
NEWS
February 15, 1999 | GREG MILLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On a dusty strip of auto body shops and plumbing suppliers in the San Fernando Valley is a little-known company that occupies one of the most embattled, contradictory and profitable corners of the Internet. For thousands of online porn sites, Cybernet Ventures Inc. is a meal ticket, a source of millions of dollars in revenue. For the government, it is a potential solution to the Internet pornography problem.
BUSINESS
July 20, 1998 | JENNIFER OLDHAM
Seeking to reclaim some of the voice traffic it has lost to the Internet, AT&T Corp. has introduced services that allow consumers to call one another anonymously from chat rooms and to organize their own online conference calls. Among a new breed of products that marry voice communications with data online, AT&T's interactive communications is an attempt by the nation's largest phone company to integrate what's known as its public switched telephone network with the World Wide Web.
BUSINESS
October 2, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER and ROBIN FIELDS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Despite signs of increasing drug use among technology's newly rich, high-tech companies are adopting policies that require screenings for blue-collar and out-of-town staff, but protect programmers and executives in tight labor markets such as Silicon Valley. The little-known practice, which labor experts call legal but blatantly biased, is being used by industry leaders such as online retailer Amazon.com Inc., software maker Intuit Corp., Internet delivery service Kozmo.
NEWS
December 25, 2000 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Patty Beron steps inside a downtown skyscraper, slips out of her chic black overcoat and prepares to lie her way into yet another dot-com party--the first of several soirees tonight. Splendora.com, an online firm that sells spa packages, is hosting a gathering for 150 bons vivants. The fare, which consists of a single table of sparkling water, is open to the public. The good stuff, tucked away in a VIP area, is in the back.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Shares of Red Hat Inc., the world's biggest distributor of Linux computer software, took their largest fall in seven years after Oracle Corp. said it would begin offering competing services at a lower price. The stock tumbled 24%, the biggest drop since the company went public in August 1999, on concerns that Oracle's decision to undercut Red Hat prices on support services for the Linux operating system would slice into sales and profit.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Chip maker Intel Corp. said Monday that its researchers, along with UC Santa Barbara, had built the world's first electronically powered hybrid silicon laser using standard silicon manufacturing processes. This development, the company said, addresses "one of the last major barriers" to making cheaper, high-bandwidth silicon devices to use with computers and data centers.
BUSINESS
March 2, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Google Inc. is switching its servers to run on Advanced Micro Devices Inc. chips instead of those made by Intel Corp., according to a Morgan Stanley report. Google, which has more than 200,000 servers, has started to buy Advanced Micro's Opteron processors with almost all new purchases, Morgan Stanley analyst Mark Edelstone said. He raised his earnings estimates for Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Advanced Micro.
BUSINESS
February 26, 2006 | David Colker, Times Staff Writer
Instant messaging is one of the simple pleasures of the Internet. You just type and send, and your online buddy has your message in an instant. But now, many of the major instant-messaging services are making things more complicated by piling on audio and video chats, games, photo sharing, animated greetings, Internet radio channels and more. Also, some of the latest messaging programs include advertising.
BUSINESS
February 6, 2006 | From Associated Press
The bits that make up our digital lives are increasingly spread over a growing number of gadgets, such as cellphones that snap pictures, hand-held computers that play music and a growing number of PCs that do all the above and more. But amid all this connectedness, something has been left out: a seamless way for all the gadgets and all the computers to stay current with all the information captured, created and edited on other devices.
BUSINESS
January 7, 2006 | Chris Gaither, Times Staff Writer
Search giant Google Inc. put its own twist on the budding online video market Friday, unveiling an Internet bazaar that allows movie studios, TV networks and any amateur with a camera to sell their wares. The Google Video Store, launching with 5,000 titles, is the first major challenge to the early lead that Apple Computer Inc. has in the emerging market for online video.
BUSINESS
November 16, 1999
Ask Jeeves Inc. agreed to buy North Hollywood-based Net Effect Systems Inc. for $288.1 million in stock, adding a live-help Web-searching service. Ask Jeeves will exchange 1.83 million shares for Net Effect, a closely held company. Investors in Net Effect, which employs 50 people, will own 5.5% of Emeryville, Calif.-based Ask Jeeves upon completion of the transaction. Ask Jeeves shares rose $10.75 to close at $167.75 on Nasdaq.
BUSINESS
April 29, 1996 | MICHAEL MURPHEY, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The concept is as old as your mother sewing labels into your clothes before you went to camp. But add a bar code and a computer and you've got a company. At least that's what Michael Chastek and Edward P. Herbert have done. They project that their Lost & Found Co. is going to be selling its computerized labeling service to 800,000 people by the end of 1996. "At the start of 1995," says Herbert, "we had about 3,700 subscribers. But we relaunched the whole product in July under the name I.D.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2005 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Its chips direct the inner workings of personal computers, and now Intel Corp. is sliding aggressively into the director's chair as it tries to shape the PC's evolution as an entertainment device. The world's biggest chipmaker has struck deals in recent weeks with a range of companies well outside its traditional relationships with computer manufacturers -- for instance, with TV networks British Sky Broadcasting and France's Canal Plus, digital recorder maker TiVo Inc.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2005 | From Associated Press
Hoping to tune in to the latest craze in digital media, Yahoo Inc. is introducing tools for finding, organizing and rating "podcasts" -- the audio programs designed to be played on Apple Computer Inc.'s iPod and many other portable music players. The Sunnyvale, Calif.-based company, which operates the world's most visited website, plans to begin testing the new service today at podcasts.yahoo.com.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|