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BUSINESS
April 26, 2001 | EDMUND SANDERS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Former regional Baby Bell phone companies got a cool reception Wednesday as they renewed their assault on a 1996 law they say makes it harder to compete with cable operators in offering high-speed Internet service. The telephone giants, such as SBC Communications Inc. and Verizon Communications Inc.
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BUSINESS
March 28, 2001 | LAWRENCE J. MAGID, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's easier to keep track of prospects, customers and vendors with customer relations management software and Internet services. Some are quite expensive and complicated. But modestly priced products are out there too, and some are actually easier to use. Maximizer 6.0 from Multiactive Software Inc., for example, costs $149 if you download it from the Web (http://www.maximizer.com) or $199 if you order it on CD-ROM. Competing products Act and Goldmine are similarly priced.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2001 | From Bloomberg News
AT&T Corp., Microsoft Corp., Cisco Systems Inc. and 16 other companies said they have created a center to share data about their computer systems to stem attacks like one last year that caused Yahoo Inc.'s Web site and others to crash. The companies will exchange information about threats, attacks, areas where networks may be vulnerable and solutions to problems through Internet Security Systems Inc., which is under contract to operate the center.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2001 | CARRIE JOHNSON, WASHINGTON POST
In the technology sector, forecasting can be dangerous business. Just ask investors who poured their savings into dot-com stocks only to lose big as cold winds hit the market last year. Today's job seekers are entering a labor market that's undoubtedly different from the "name your price" days of early 2000--though it's not without opportunities for people who can demonstrate their worth to employers in a rapidly changing environment.
BUSINESS
January 22, 2001 | CARRIE JOHNSON, WASHINGTON POST
Forget about high-priced programmers or suave business-development staffers. What technology companies really need as they enter the new millennium are tried-and-true managers. So say venture capitalists, consultants and recruiters who watched more than 210 dot-coms go down the tubes in 2000, according to a recent study by Webmergers.com, a San Francisco research outlet for companies in the market to buy competitors or sell themselves.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2001 | JOSEPH MENN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The wait for a turnaround in the technology industry was supposed to get shorter this fall. But those expectations have been dashed by a flurry of downbeat reports in recent weeks. As Silicon Valley returns to work this week, analysts are bracing for a fresh wave of warnings about third-quarter earnings from key tech firms. Last week, Tokyo-based Toshiba Corp.
BUSINESS
September 3, 2001 | THOMAS S. MULLIGAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The technology sector, already beset with overcapacity and anemic demand, faces a further threat from deteriorating investor psychology in the wake of the stock market's latest slide, some Wall Street experts believe. Investors who saw their major tech shares plunge to multiyear lows in the spring, then rebound, felt twice burned last week as some of the most widely held names tumbled to new lows.
BUSINESS
December 5, 2005 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Its chips direct the inner workings of personal computers, and now Intel Corp. is sliding aggressively into the director's chair as it tries to shape the PC's evolution as an entertainment device. The world's biggest chipmaker has struck deals in recent weeks with a range of companies well outside its traditional relationships with computer manufacturers -- for instance, with TV networks British Sky Broadcasting and France's Canal Plus, digital recorder maker TiVo Inc.
BUSINESS
October 10, 2005 | From Associated Press
Hoping to tune in to the latest craze in digital media, Yahoo Inc. is introducing tools for finding, organizing and rating "podcasts" -- the audio programs designed to be played on Apple Computer Inc.'s iPod and many other portable music players. The Sunnyvale, Calif.-based company, which operates the world's most visited website, plans to begin testing the new service today at podcasts.yahoo.com.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Intel Corp. plans to spend $1 billion to $1.5 billion to overhaul its semiconductor production facility in New Mexico to manufacture computer chips with next-generation technology. The Rio Rancho factory is expected to begin producing 45-nanometer chips -- meaning they will have features as tiny as 45-billionths of a meter -- in the second half of 2008, Intel said Monday. The transistors on such chips are so small that more than 30 million can fit onto the head of a pin.
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