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Computer Technology

SPORTS
March 27, 1998 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Maddon sits in the Tempe Diablo Stadium coaches' room, hunched over his laptop, his glasses down his nose, his concentration focused. Next door in the clubhouse, Angel pitcher Chuck Finley tilts his head like the RCA dog and squints at the computer-generated spring-training workout schedule. "You tried to read these charts?" he asks. "If I could figure out where I'm supposed to be, then maybe I could figure out when I'm supposed to be there." So near, but so far.
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BUSINESS
November 15, 1999 | TONY PERRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Three things provide purpose and stamina to this big boat: bombs, beans and news from home. All three are best delivered quickly. To hasten their delivery, the Navy's Pacific Fleet is two years into a $400-million-plus overhaul of its computer technology and information systems that is shaking up the way the tradition-bound--and sometimes computer- resistant--sea service does its job. "I think for a long time the Navy considered computers good for small jobs and for exchanging jokes," said Cmdr.
NEWS
August 15, 1993 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The dinosaurs in "Jurassic Park" were hatched on a hard drive, incubated in computer technology that did not exist a year ago. Only 1,500 extras were hired for a crowd scene in "In the Line of Fire," but they were digitally replicated--five times--to beef up the throng. The crew editing "The Coneheads" sliced days off post-production using tools of a new electronic cut-and-paste era.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 19, 2004 | Scott Timberg, Times Staff Writer
Artists have been using various kinds of technology since before there was language to describe it, but now the accelerated pace of change has drawn even technophobes into the game. This year, two of the most talked-about films -- the critically acclaimed "Tarnation," made for $218 mostly on a Macintosh, and "The Polar Express," the critical bomb made for $170 million with innovative "performance capture" sensors -- both made headlines for their unconventional technology.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 5, 1997 | LESLEY WRIGHT
The city's water officials are preparing to jump into the technological age with a $1.9-million program to replace thousands of aged meters. About 17,000 residential meters are so old that the city is losing nearly $200,000 per year in revenue, said Loren Tuthill, deputy director of the Public Works Department. Pistons in the meters, which are 20 to 25 years old, tend to slow down in their old age and register less water than is actually used, he said.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1997 | JENNIFER OLDHAM
In the United States, Mazda ads show the open road. But in Japan, they feature a family of pizza-loving stick people made possible by state-of-the-art computer effects. Animated by Venice-based House of Moves, one spot has the stick dad running through the rain, carrying a pizza. He jumps in his Mazda Capella sedan and places the pizza on a reclined seat for an impromptu family picnic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Lottery fever! Catch it--and snag a bunch of computers. At stake: $100 million for PCs, high-speed computer lines, software and training for teachers in how to use all the gear. On Tuesday, 216 high schools across the state were chosen by random drawing to receive the first chunk of money to be given out under Gov. Pete Wilson's Digital High School Initiative. "Yes! Yes! I'm so excited I can hardly contain myself," said Theresa Saunders, principal of Hoover High School in Glendale.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2000 | BRIAN BERGSTEIN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
City workers in Oceanside were drowning in passwords. One to check e-mail, others to see water billing records or police reports, all on top of the codes and personal identification numbers they had to keep straight in their off-the-job lives. Time and money were wasted answering as many as 30 calls a day from workers who forgot or lost passwords. Now, those calls are down to one or two a week. Two years ago, Oceanside began installing mouse-size fingerprint scanners at city computers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The University of California began tearing down the walls of its libraries Tuesday--at least symbolically--by making its enormous collection of periodicals, photographs and historical documents available to anyone with a computer and a modem. UC President Richard C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1997 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles school officials were awarded a $2.6-million federal grant Monday that will allow them to double the number of academies offering high-tech skills to students interested in joining Southern California's booming entertainment and commercial industries.
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