Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsComputer Technology
IN THE NEWS

Computer Technology

BUSINESS
September 14, 1998 | BRAD SKILLMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Straight from the pages of science fiction, electronic books will land in the public's eye this fall with promises of searchable text and the ability to hold the equivalent of 10, if not hundreds, of volumes in a portable device weighing only a few pounds. Books that have been taken out of print could soon be available electronically. Readers frustrated by the minuscule type on the pages will be able to increase the size to their comfort level. This fall, NuvoMedia Inc.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
June 22, 1998 | P.J. HUFFSTUTTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Could supermodels someday look like cyborgs? Scientists say that's likely, given the current high-tech trend to build "smart clothing," or to incorporate computer technology into the public's daily wardrobe. Right now, however, many of the offerings remain more cyber geek than cyber chic: keyboards strapped to wrists, power cords running down necks, batteries clinging to underwear. Take ViA Inc.'s flexible PC, a full-blown computer that wraps around a person's waist.
NEWS
May 17, 1998 | REBECCA ROLWING, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Scientists are fine-tuning a new transistor that cranks out computations 10 times faster than existing computer technology. The transistor, under development by federal scientists at Sandia National Laboratories, could benefit everything from computers and cell phones to satellites and toxic-materials sensors. "If you can integrate this with conventional silicon processing, it would mean cheaper, faster, smaller, better," said Paul R.
SPORTS
March 27, 1998 | JOHN WEYLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Joe Maddon sits in the Tempe Diablo Stadium coaches' room, hunched over his laptop, his glasses down his nose, his concentration focused. Next door in the clubhouse, Angel pitcher Chuck Finley tilts his head like the RCA dog and squints at the computer-generated spring-training workout schedule. "You tried to read these charts?" he asks. "If I could figure out where I'm supposed to be, then maybe I could figure out when I'm supposed to be there." So near, but so far.
BOOKS
February 8, 1998 | CLIFF STOLL, Cliff Stoll is an astronomer, computer jock and nightly commentator on MSNBC's program "The Site." He is the author of "The Cuckoo's Egg" and "Silicon Snake Oil."
What makes a computer elegant? Why did so many users latch onto warty DOS computers while passing over the refined Apple system? Why do so many love computing despite constant frustration? Why do we replace our computers as often as they replaced cars in the 1950s? Why spend three grand on a battery-operated, full-color laptop computer that's mainly used for solitaire? Maybe it's the beauty of the machine.
BUSINESS
October 30, 1997 | JENNIFER OLDHAM
In the United States, Mazda ads show the open road. But in Japan, they feature a family of pizza-loving stick people made possible by state-of-the-art computer effects. Animated by Venice-based House of Moves, one spot has the stick dad running through the rain, carrying a pizza. He jumps in his Mazda Capella sedan and places the pizza on a reclined seat for an impromptu family picnic.
NEWS
October 21, 1997 | From Associated Press
A report concluding that the nation is vulnerable to electronic warfare was delivered to the White House Monday by a presidential commission. The classified findings and recommendations of the Commission on Critical Infrastructure Protection say the danger of computer attacks that could shut down communications and power grids is real and requires early action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1997 | RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
Lottery fever! Catch it--and snag a bunch of computers. At stake: $100 million for PCs, high-speed computer lines, software and training for teachers in how to use all the gear. On Tuesday, 216 high schools across the state were chosen by random drawing to receive the first chunk of money to be given out under Gov. Pete Wilson's Digital High School Initiative. "Yes! Yes! I'm so excited I can hardly contain myself," said Theresa Saunders, principal of Hoover High School in Glendale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1997 | KENNETH R. WEISS, TIMES EDUCATION WRITER
The University of California began tearing down the walls of its libraries Tuesday--at least symbolically--by making its enormous collection of periodicals, photographs and historical documents available to anyone with a computer and a modem. UC President Richard C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1997 | DUKE HELFAND, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Los Angeles school officials were awarded a $2.6-million federal grant Monday that will allow them to double the number of academies offering high-tech skills to students interested in joining Southern California's booming entertainment and commercial industries.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|