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BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The National Security Agency has reportedly used automated systems to infect user computers with malware since 2010, according to a Wednesday report. And at times the agency pretended to be Facebook to install its malware. The NSA has been using a program codenamed TURBINE to contaminate computers and networks with malware "implants" capable of spying on users, according to The Intercept , which cited documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden. Between 85,000 and 100,000 of these implants have been deployed worldwide thus far, the report said.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Reginald Clarke is someone Obamacare was designed to help. The 55-year-old, who was homeless for a time, now has an apartment in Gardena and a street-cleaning job that pays him $14,000 a year. He hadn't visited a doctor in four or five years. Then, last fall, his girlfriend told him he would be eligible for Medi-Cal starting Jan. 1. "I was excited. I could go get a physical," he said. "There are a few things I need. " But joy turned to exasperation when Clarke's application, filed in December, was mistakenly rejected - and then seemed to disappear from county and state computer systems.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1994
Old computers never die--they just pile up in the garage. ROBERT BUTLER Buena Park
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
At a time when public trust in Wall Street already is at a low, new allegations about high-speed stock trading threaten to further erode confidence in the financial markets. The furor centers on accusations that professional traders armed with ultra-fast computers have rigged the stock market. High-speed firms engage in what critics say amounts to insider trading, using super-charged systems to decipher trading patterns. Criticism of high-frequency trading has long swirled in financial circles, and multiple regulators are conducting investigations.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google has announced the latest versions of its buck-the-trend Chromebook line of computers. The two Web-centric computers introduced by the Internet company are made by Samsung. They are the Chrome Series 5 550, a laptop, and the Chromebox, which is a small desktop that looks very much like Apple's Mac mini. The computers have received a hardware update over their predecessors and now boot in less than seven seconds, according to Google. The new Chromebooks are three times faster than the first set of Chromebooks released last year.
BUSINESS
January 23, 2013 | By Andrew Tangel, Los Angeles Times
NEW YORK - Federal prosecutors said they had foiled an international cyber-crime ring that targeted bank accounts in the U.S. and around the globe. The criminal charges, disclosed Wednesday, highlight the vulnerabilities of online consumer banking, which has become more popular in the digital age. It also comes just months after most every major U.S. bank suffered a relentless round of online attacks by Middle Eastern hackers. In the case unveiled Wednesday, three men - a Russian, a Latvian and a Romanian - allegedly created and spread a virus they called "Gozi" that infected more than 1 million computers around the globe, including at least 40,000 in the United States.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Chris Erskine
A computer outage at United Airlines delayed thousands of travelers on Thursday. The two-hour outage held up morning flights from Los Angeles to London. It was United's third major computer mishap this year, Associated Press says . . . . More than 1.792 million passengers will pass through LAX during the Thanksgiving holiday period, a modest increase of 0.3% over last year. If you need help navigating the busy airport, keep an eye open for red-vested volunteers, who will be there to answer questions . . . .  LAX is second to only Chicago's O'Hare for Thanksgiving traffic,  the online travel agency Orbitz Worldwide reports . . . . L.A. Tourism has become the first U.S. convention and visitors bureau to hit 1 million Facebook fan s , according to a commissioned study conducted by Sparkloft Media.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
IBM's 5 in 5 -- a list of five innovations that could change the world in five years -- focuses on how computers are developing the ability to taste, touch, hear, see and listen just like humans do, except way better. It is kind of exciting and kind of terrifying, but mostly just really cool. For example, Hendrik Hamann, a research manager of physical systems for IBM, describes a smartphone that could use a computerized nose to " smell " if we are sick. Forget the thermometer and the doctor's visit -- we will simply breathe into our cellphones to find out if we have the flu. Robyn Schwartz describes how smartphones of the future might use vibrations to allow us to virtually " touch " a piece of material and feel its texture.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
The Pentagon's Missile Defense Agency has told employees to stop using work computers to peruse pornograpy and visit porn sites -- just the latest example of public employees behaving badly. Bloomberg News service obtained a memo that agency Executive Director John James Jr. wrote on July 27 revealing that government employees and contractors had been detected in recent months "engaging in inappropriate use of the MDA network," including "accessing websites, or transmitting messages, containing pornographic or sexually explicit images.
BUSINESS
March 31, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court sounded ready Monday to curtail the use of certain business patents in a case involving a patent for a computerized risk analysis of international financial transactions. Use of such business-method patents has soared in recent decades. Once granted, they can give a firm or a person a monopoly for up to 20 years to profit from the patented process. Critics say many of the recent computer-related patents are vague and stifle innovation by giving exclusive rights to commonly used methods or formulas.
SPORTS
March 31, 2014 | By Eric Sondheimer
Jake King, a golfer at North Hollywood High, had to miss last week's scheduled match because he was in Maryland helping represent his school in the CyberPatriot VI competition that was won by North Hollywood.  Competitors show off their cyber-defense knowledge to "thwart attacks on computer systems and networks. " Said North Hollywood golf Coach Steve Miller: "I hope he breaks into the 80s like he can can break into a computer. " Eric.sondheimer@latimes.com  
BUSINESS
March 25, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO - A tiny Irvine company founded by a 21-year-old Cal State Long Beach drop-out may play a leading role in Facebook's next major bet on the future of the Internet: that virtual reality will change the way people experience the Web. Facebook said Tuesday that it was buying Oculus VR, maker of virtual reality headsets for video game players, for $2 billion. The ultimate goal of the acquisition, the giant social network said, is to create an immersive 3-D experience in which users don't just chat online with friends but grab a cup of coffee with them in a virtual cafe or travel with them to distant places, just by putting on a pair of goggles with dark lenses.
BUSINESS
March 22, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
To keep an eye on his child via his smartphone, Marc Gilbert installed Internet-connected video baby monitors in his home in Houston. One evening, Gilbert heard a stranger's voice bellowing obscenities from the monitor. He disconnected the device after realizing that it had been hacked. "I'm a pretty technical guy, and I thought I knew how all this stuff should be hooked up," said Gilbert, who has written several letters to his congressman and other elected officials, trying to bring the security issue to their attention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 21, 2014 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO - Records for nearly 56,000 San Francisco patients, some with Social Security numbers, were stored in computers stolen last month from a medical billing firm in Torrance, said San Francisco's Department of Public Health on Friday. “We are working to ensure that all patients are notified and provided with resources to help them protect their privacy,” said Barbara Garcia, San Francisco's health director. Most of the San Francisco patients whose records were stolen were uninsured and visited the city's public health offices, including San Francisco General Hospital and Trauma Center, between August 2012 and November 2013, the department said.
SCIENCE
March 12, 2014 | By Amina Khan
NASA's elderly Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter flipped into “safe mode” on Sunday after an unexpected computing glitch caused the spacecraft to switch from its main computer to its backup. The 8-year-old satellite, which left Earth in August 2005 and entered Martian orbit on March 10, 2006, has lived well beyond its primary two-year science phase, so perhaps the occasional "brain fart" is understandable. Tasked with searching for signs that water flowed on Mars for a long period of time, it's been sending Earth detailed information about seasonal and longer-term changes on our rust-hued neighbor . In fact, it has returned more data than all other interplanetary missions combined, according to officials at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in La Cañada Flintridge, which manages the mission.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The National Security Agency has reportedly used automated systems to infect user computers with malware since 2010, according to a Wednesday report. And at times the agency pretended to be Facebook to install its malware. The NSA has been using a program codenamed TURBINE to contaminate computers and networks with malware "implants" capable of spying on users, according to The Intercept , which cited documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden. Between 85,000 and 100,000 of these implants have been deployed worldwide thus far, the report said.
NATIONAL
March 11, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - A long-simmering dispute between the CIA and its Senate overseers erupted into public view Tuesday when the head of the Senate Intelligence Committee accused the agency of possible crimes and of attempting to intimidate committee staffers investigating the CIA's former use of waterboarding and other harsh interrogation techniques. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), the committee chairwoman, said the CIA secretly searched computers used by Senate staffers and might have violated constitutional provisions on separation of powers and unreasonable searches, a federal law on computer fraud and abuse, and a presidential order that prohibits the CIA from domestic searches and surveillance.
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