Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsComputers
IN THE NEWS

Computers

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 8, 1994
Old computers never die--they just pile up in the garage. ROBERT BUTLER Buena Park
ARTICLES BY DATE
ENTERTAINMENT
April 24, 2014 | By David Ng
Officials at the Andy Warhol Museum in Pittsburgh have announced the recovery of long-unseen digital images that the late pop artist created on a Commodore Amiga computer in 1985. The museum announced Thursday that the images were extracted from floppy disks that Warhol had used to save the files. The images had been inaccessible for years due to the obsolete Commodore format, the museum said. In the '80s Warhol was commissioned by Commodore International to create art with the Amiga to demonstrate its graphic arts capabilities, according to the museum.
Advertisement
BUSINESS
May 29, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Google has announced the latest versions of its buck-the-trend Chromebook line of computers. The two Web-centric computers introduced by the Internet company are made by Samsung. They are the Chrome Series 5 550, a laptop, and the Chromebox, which is a small desktop that looks very much like Apple's Mac mini. The computers have received a hardware update over their predecessors and now boot in less than seven seconds, according to Google. The new Chromebooks are three times faster than the first set of Chromebooks released last year.
BUSINESS
April 24, 2014 | David Lazarus
As far as corporate notices go, they don't get much creepier than this recent alert from Verizon Wireless. The company says it's "enhancing" its Relevant Mobile Advertising program, which it uses to collect data on customers' online habits so that marketers can pitch stuff at them with greater precision. "In addition to the customer information that's currently part of the program, we will soon use an anonymous, unique identifier we create when you register on our websites," Verizon Wireless is telling customers.
BUSINESS
March 12, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The National Security Agency has reportedly used automated systems to infect user computers with malware since 2010, according to a Wednesday report. And at times the agency pretended to be Facebook to install its malware. The NSA has been using a program codenamed TURBINE to contaminate computers and networks with malware "implants" capable of spying on users, according to The Intercept , which cited documents provided by whistleblower Edward Snowden. Between 85,000 and 100,000 of these implants have been deployed worldwide thus far, the report said.
NEWS
November 16, 2012 | By Chris Erskine
A computer outage at United Airlines delayed thousands of travelers on Thursday. The two-hour outage held up morning flights from Los Angeles to London. It was United's third major computer mishap this year, Associated Press says . . . . More than 1.792 million passengers will pass through LAX during the Thanksgiving holiday period, a modest increase of 0.3% over last year. If you need help navigating the busy airport, keep an eye open for red-vested volunteers, who will be there to answer questions . . . .  LAX is second to only Chicago's O'Hare for Thanksgiving traffic,  the online travel agency Orbitz Worldwide reports . . . . L.A. Tourism has become the first U.S. convention and visitors bureau to hit 1 million Facebook fan s , according to a commissioned study conducted by Sparkloft Media.
BUSINESS
May 24, 2012 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Could Apple's mobile assistant, Siri, be making the jump to the company's line of Mac computers? It could happen, reports suggested. Nine to 5 Mac reported signs indicating that while Siri might not join Apple's Macs soon its related feature, Dictation, might. Dictation, which debuted with this year's line of iPads, appears in apps that use a keyboard and enables users to speak rather than type to create text. Programming code inside the latest version of Safari on Apple's upcoming operating system, Mountain Lion, show evidence that Dictation could be added to Mac computers, 9 to 5 Mac reported.
NATIONAL
August 3, 2012 | By Rene Lynch
The Pentagon's Missile Defense Agency has told employees to stop using work computers to peruse pornograpy and visit porn sites -- just the latest example of public employees behaving badly. Bloomberg News service obtained a memo that agency Executive Director John James Jr. wrote on July 27 revealing that government employees and contractors had been detected in recent months "engaging in inappropriate use of the MDA network," including "accessing websites, or transmitting messages, containing pornographic or sexually explicit images.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2012 | By Deborah Netburn
IBM's 5 in 5 -- a list of five innovations that could change the world in five years -- focuses on how computers are developing the ability to taste, touch, hear, see and listen just like humans do, except way better. It is kind of exciting and kind of terrifying, but mostly just really cool. For example, Hendrik Hamann, a research manager of physical systems for IBM, describes a smartphone that could use a computerized nose to " smell " if we are sick. Forget the thermometer and the doctor's visit -- we will simply breathe into our cellphones to find out if we have the flu. Robyn Schwartz describes how smartphones of the future might use vibrations to allow us to virtually " touch " a piece of material and feel its texture.
HOME & GARDEN
April 22, 2014 | By Anne Colby
There's an ecological cost to staying connected and entertained. Computers, printers, televisions, cellphones, stereos, game systems and other electronics may contain lead, copper or other heavy metals or potentially toxic substances. When electronics have outlived their usefulness, it's important to dispose of them properly rather than just toss them in the trash to be placed into landfills. Los Angeles city and county residents may drop off their electronic waste free of charge at S.A.F.E.
SCIENCE
April 22, 2014 | By Deborah Netburn
Live streaming video by Ustream The spacewalk tools have been laid out. The Quest airlock has been set up. There's a spacewalk coming, and you can watch it live right here. Early Wednesday morning NASA astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Steve Swanson will don their spacesuits for a 2 1/2 -hour spacewalk outside the International Space Station. Barring any surprises, NASA's live coverage of the event will begin at 5:30 a.m. PDT. The spacewalk itself is scheduled to start at 6:20 a.m.  The spacewalk was ordered this month to replace a computer on the space station's exterior that failed during a routine check.
BUSINESS
April 18, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan and Andrea Chang
A SpaceX Falcon 9 rocket launched from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station on Friday and sped through a cloud-covered sky on its way to deliver supplies to the International Space Station for NASA. The Hawthorne-based rocket manufacturer launched the cargo mission despite a computer glitch aboard the space station and bad weather that threatened to push the liftoff back a day. Promptly at 12:25 p.m. PDT, the rocket fired up its nine engines and launched into orbit, carrying a capsule packed with 5,000 pounds of supplies for the two American, one Japanese and three Russian astronauts aboard the space station.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Jason Song
Jewel Wade remembers the tense atmosphere at Compton Community College in 2006, when it was rumored the school would close. "The whole school was kind of depressing because nobody knew what was going on," Wade recalled Tuesday. State officials did strip the school of its accreditation and turned the campus into a satellite of a nearby two-year college. The $25-million library, which had been set to open in 2007, was found to be plagued with code violations and sat unused for nearly seven years before finally opening late last month after undergoing extensive renovations that cost an additional $4 million.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 15, 2014 | By Hector Tobar
There's something delightfully strange and counterintuitive about the way time operates in the opening chapters of Michael Lewis' new book, "Flash Boys: A Wall Street Revolt. " Lewis describes a new kind of Wall Street gold rush. In the entirely automated, pre- and post-crash stock market of the first two decades of the 21st century, human traders have become superfluous. Stocks are bought and sold inside computers, and a new brand of high-frequency trader is making a fortune thanks to a precious new commodity - speed.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2014 | By Richard Verrier
Before filming a massive battle on a freeway overpass in Cleveland, directors of Marvel Entertainment's recent release "Captain America: The Winter Soldier" didn't leave anything to chance. So Anthony and Joe Russo staged a kind of digital dress rehearsal for the scene, planning the entire action sequence - including the position of stunt performers, the placement of explosive squibs and the types of camera lenses that would be used - on a computer screen. They did so with the help of Proof Inc., a Los Angeles company that specializes in a process known as previsualization.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Eryn Brown
Reginald Clarke is someone Obamacare was designed to help. The 55-year-old, who was homeless for a time, now has an apartment in Gardena and a street-cleaning job that pays him $14,000 a year. He hadn't visited a doctor in four or five years. Then, last fall, his girlfriend told him he would be eligible for Medi-Cal starting Jan. 1. "I was excited. I could go get a physical," he said. "There are a few things I need. " But joy turned to exasperation when Clarke's application, filed in December, was mistakenly rejected - and then seemed to disappear from county and state computer systems.
BUSINESS
April 2, 2014 | By Walter Hamilton
At a time when public trust in Wall Street already is at a low, new allegations about high-speed stock trading threaten to further erode confidence in the financial markets. The furor centers on accusations that professional traders armed with ultra-fast computers have rigged the stock market. High-speed firms engage in what critics say amounts to insider trading, using super-charged systems to decipher trading patterns. Criticism of high-frequency trading has long swirled in financial circles, and multiple regulators are conducting investigations.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|