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BUSINESS
June 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
ConAgra Foods Inc., the food giant that makes Hebrew National hot dogs, said a lawsuit questioning the product's kosher status is "without merit. " The lawsuit, filed by 11 consumers in federal court in Minnesota, claims that Hebrew National charges high prices for a designation it doesn't deserve. The suit, which is seeking class-action status, accuses ConAgra of often using dirty animals for its meats. Kosher standards demand healthy and clean livestock. According to the suit, employees of a meat processing company used by ConAgra complained that the beef preparation methods being used weren't up to par, but those workers were ignored, retaliated against or fired, according to the suit.
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BUSINESS
November 28, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
ConAgra Foods Inc. makes some of the best-known packaged food brands around, including Chef Boyardee, Hebrew National, Hunt's, Orville Redenbacher's, Reddi-wip and Slim Jim. But these days, there is a big trend is toward private grocery store labels, such as Safeway's Open Nature line and Albertson's eponymous products. ConAgra plans to pay $6.8 billion to get further into that market. It's buying Ralcorp Holdings Inc., the largest producer of foods sold under private labels.
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BUSINESS
November 27, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
ConAgra Foods Inc. makes some of the best-known packaged food brands around, including Chef Boyardee, Hebrew National, Hunt's, Orville Redenbacher's, Reddi-wip and Slim Jim. But these days, the money is in private grocery store labels, such as Safeway's Open Nature line and Albertson's eponymous products. With its $6.8-billion purchase of Ralcorp Holdings, the largest producer of foods under such in-store brands, ConAgra is making a play to dominate the growing market. ConAgra will give Ralcorp stakeholders $90 per share in cash, a 28.2% premium on the closing price on Monday.
BUSINESS
November 27, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
ConAgra Foods Inc. makes some of the best-known packaged food brands around, including Chef Boyardee, Hebrew National, Hunt's, Orville Redenbacher's, Reddi-wip and Slim Jim. But these days, the money is in private grocery store labels, such as Safeway's Open Nature line and Albertson's eponymous products. With its $6.8-billion purchase of Ralcorp Holdings, the largest producer of foods under such in-store brands, ConAgra is making a play to dominate the growing market. ConAgra will give Ralcorp stakeholders $90 per share in cash, a 28.2% premium on the closing price on Monday.
BUSINESS
November 28, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
ConAgra Foods Inc. makes some of the best-known packaged food brands around, including Chef Boyardee, Hebrew National, Hunt's, Orville Redenbacher's, Reddi-wip and Slim Jim. But these days, there is a big trend is toward private grocery store labels, such as Safeway's Open Nature line and Albertson's eponymous products. ConAgra plans to pay $6.8 billion to get further into that market. It's buying Ralcorp Holdings Inc., the largest producer of foods sold under private labels.
NATIONAL
December 15, 2009 | By Mary MacVean
Despite a 2-year-old pledge by more than a dozen major food companies to advertise healthier foods to children, about two-thirds of those companies' ads remain for products of low nutritional quality, according to a study released Monday. The report, released a day before the Federal Trade Commission and other government agencies are set to suggest nutritional standards for foods marketed to kids, concluded that the industry's effort at self-regulation has failed. Ads for sugary cereals, fast food and sweet snacks made up more than 70% of the total studied.
SCIENCE
September 29, 2009 | Mary MacVean
Most shoppers know that cabbage and carrots are smart choices at the grocery store. But it might surprise people that Lucky Charms, Froot Loops, Ritz Bits Peanut Butter Chocolatey Blast crackers and Kid Cuisine Magical Cheese Stuffed Crust Cheese Pizza meals are billed as "Smart Choices" under a controversial new food-rating program. A logo adopted by food company giants is showing up in major supermarkets: a green "Smart Choice" check mark, meant to replace the blizzard of health labels that clutter food package fronts: "Sensible Solution, "Smart Spot," and so on. Sponsors say the logo will help an overweight and overwhelmed public make better food choices in a way that reflects how people really shop.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2001 | DEBORAH COHEN, REUTERS
ConAgra Foods Inc.'s recent move to separate financial results of its branded foods from agricultural businesses might be more than a bookkeeping shuffle, and could prepare the ground for an eventual spinoff or sale of the company's slower-growing units, analysts said. "This could be the first step," said Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown analyst Eric Katzman. "They've been putting resources behind the higher-margin packaged-foods areas, and by their own admission have disclosed that parts of their agricultural products, and even meat-processing, have under-performed."
BUSINESS
March 11, 2010 | By Matt Andrejczak
Soup, which sustained a nation through the Great Depression, has itself fallen on hard times in the "Great Recession." Winter is supposed to be prime soup season. And one might expect that to be even more the case with U.S. unemployment at 10% during one of the snowiest East Coast winters on record. Soup is a hot meal that's both cheap and quick. But trade data highlight the balancing act name-brand food companies face in this new era of American thriftiness. If it's not on sale, shoppers tend to look elsewhere.
HEALTH
May 17, 2010 | By Emily Sohn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For decades, people have been ignoring advice to eat less salt — in large part because it's hard to avoid. Processed and restaurant foods are simply loaded with sodium. Now, under growing pressure from doctors, consumers, states, advocacy groups and even national-level advisors, big-name food companies are slashing sodium from soups, potato chips, sauces, condiments and other products. Last month, the Food and Drug Administration announced its intent to reduce salt in the American diet, beginning with a call for voluntary cutbacks from the food industry.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu, Los Angeles Times
ConAgra Foods Inc., the food giant that makes Hebrew National hot dogs, said a lawsuit questioning the product's kosher status is "without merit. " The lawsuit, filed by 11 consumers in federal court in Minnesota, claims that Hebrew National charges high prices for a designation it doesn't deserve. The suit, which is seeking class-action status, accuses ConAgra of often using dirty animals for its meats. Kosher standards demand healthy and clean livestock. According to the suit, employees of a meat processing company used by ConAgra complained that the beef preparation methods being used weren't up to par, but those workers were ignored, retaliated against or fired, according to the suit.
HEALTH
May 17, 2010 | By Emily Sohn, Special to the Los Angeles Times
For decades, people have been ignoring advice to eat less salt — in large part because it's hard to avoid. Processed and restaurant foods are simply loaded with sodium. Now, under growing pressure from doctors, consumers, states, advocacy groups and even national-level advisors, big-name food companies are slashing sodium from soups, potato chips, sauces, condiments and other products. Last month, the Food and Drug Administration announced its intent to reduce salt in the American diet, beginning with a call for voluntary cutbacks from the food industry.
BUSINESS
March 11, 2010 | By Matt Andrejczak
Soup, which sustained a nation through the Great Depression, has itself fallen on hard times in the "Great Recession." Winter is supposed to be prime soup season. And one might expect that to be even more the case with U.S. unemployment at 10% during one of the snowiest East Coast winters on record. Soup is a hot meal that's both cheap and quick. But trade data highlight the balancing act name-brand food companies face in this new era of American thriftiness. If it's not on sale, shoppers tend to look elsewhere.
NATIONAL
December 15, 2009 | By Mary MacVean
Despite a 2-year-old pledge by more than a dozen major food companies to advertise healthier foods to children, about two-thirds of those companies' ads remain for products of low nutritional quality, according to a study released Monday. The report, released a day before the Federal Trade Commission and other government agencies are set to suggest nutritional standards for foods marketed to kids, concluded that the industry's effort at self-regulation has failed. Ads for sugary cereals, fast food and sweet snacks made up more than 70% of the total studied.
SCIENCE
September 29, 2009 | Mary MacVean
Most shoppers know that cabbage and carrots are smart choices at the grocery store. But it might surprise people that Lucky Charms, Froot Loops, Ritz Bits Peanut Butter Chocolatey Blast crackers and Kid Cuisine Magical Cheese Stuffed Crust Cheese Pizza meals are billed as "Smart Choices" under a controversial new food-rating program. A logo adopted by food company giants is showing up in major supermarkets: a green "Smart Choice" check mark, meant to replace the blizzard of health labels that clutter food package fronts: "Sensible Solution, "Smart Spot," and so on. Sponsors say the logo will help an overweight and overwhelmed public make better food choices in a way that reflects how people really shop.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2002 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget dinner. These days most food companies are moving right on to dessert, pumping up the sugar in many of their new products--even diet food--in hopes of attracting new customers and boosting sales of tired brands. Even frozen french fries are getting a chocolate and cinnamon sugar makeover. Sweet sells, judging by the top-selling products of last year.
BUSINESS
April 28, 2002 | MELINDA FULMER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Forget dinner. These days most food companies are moving right on to dessert, pumping up the sugar in many of their new products--even diet food--in hopes of attracting new customers and boosting sales of tired brands. Even frozen french fries are getting a chocolate and cinnamon sugar makeover. Sweet sells, judging by the top-selling products of last year.
BUSINESS
December 27, 2001 | DEBORAH COHEN, REUTERS
ConAgra Foods Inc.'s recent move to separate financial results of its branded foods from agricultural businesses might be more than a bookkeeping shuffle, and could prepare the ground for an eventual spinoff or sale of the company's slower-growing units, analysts said. "This could be the first step," said Deutsche Banc Alex. Brown analyst Eric Katzman. "They've been putting resources behind the higher-margin packaged-foods areas, and by their own admission have disclosed that parts of their agricultural products, and even meat-processing, have under-performed."
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