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ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2008
WHY DOES The Times again give publicity to so-called artist Robbie Conal ["Poster Boy for Mischief," by Irene Lacher, Oct. 13]? Over the years, he and his crew have engaged in the illegal activity of plastering posters on utility boxes, poles, fences, etc. throughout the L.A. area. Government agencies have spent considerable sums of taxpayers' money on the poster removal from public property. He should be behind bars, not in an art gallery. Donald McPoland Glendale
ARTICLES BY DATE
HOME & GARDEN
October 20, 2010 | By Lauren Beale, Los Angeles Times
Los Angeles poster artist Robbie Conal and his wife, movie and television title designer Deborah Ross, have listed their Gregory Ain-designed home in Mar Vista for $1,149,000. The 1,857-square-foot house is one of the largest in a development of 52 so-called "Modernique Homes," which strove to combine good design and low-cost housing in the postwar years. Conal and Ross were both interested in the Ain homes before they met in 1987. "They were designed with a romantically progressive ideal of everyday social interaction, including contiguous ?
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 29, 1991
In response to Peggy Rowe Estrada (April 15 Counterpunch): Who is Estrada and why were your readers subjected to approximately one-quarter page of her nauseating nonsense? "If Conal's posters were truly art, he would sell them at gift shops. . . ."? Words of wisdom from a truly discerning member of the public, I'm sure. BRIONY JAMES Hollywood
ENTERTAINMENT
March 4, 2010 | By Alie Ward
A battery of fluorescent lights blazes in an emptied retail space on Vine Street in Hollywood. Once home to the discount emporium Big Lots, the cavernous building has been gutted of housewares and transformed into Manifest Equality, a temporary art show running through the weekend. Pulling together a large number of works addressing themes of equality, justice, unity and love, the pop-up event intends to spotlight civil rights issues surrounding Proposition 8, which, since passing in 2008, has prohibited marriage between homosexual partners in California.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 1992
In a city experiencing an ongoing explosion of neighborhood-destroying graffiti, "midnight guerrilla" Conal, despite his lofty pretensions, remains just another graffiti vandal. Like any vandals, Conal and his self-righteous dilettante adorers see nothing wrong with defacing the property of others with his art without gaining permission or offering apology. Not even Michelangelo or Rembrandt displayed that brand of arrogance. Spray-painting taggers and gang placadors , those other neighborhood-ravaging midnight guerrillas, display the same irresponsibility, but one might at least attribute that to impoverished social conditions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 25, 1988
Vandalism is vandalism, be it in the form of graffiti or politically relevant art. The Los Angeles Police Department has more serious matters to attend, but this and the publicity they receive from The Times do not make Conal and his gang any less guilty. MADELINE BAILEY Studio City
ENTERTAINMENT
May 15, 1993
Antonovich must believe that a separate set of rules applies to all of the politicians, who, at election time, are guilty of the same offense to public and private property of which he accuses Conal. MICHAEL J. GOLDBERG Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 27, 1991
I am appalled by the many anti-Robbie Conal letters that have bombarded Calendar (Saturday Letters, April 13 and 20). I don't feel that Calendar was irresponsible in publishing the April 10 Conal article. Nor was it biased (after all, all those anti-Conal letters were printed). Conal is an established artist and social critic. His new work is worthy news; isn't Calendar supposed to cover important developments in the art world? The issue is essentially one of intolerance.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 25, 1988
I would like to respond to the letter "Guerrilla Artist" (Nov. 9). Yes, I agree there is rent gouging going on in Los Angeles, homelessness, illegal dumping of wastes, ugly architecture, traffic piling up. Oh yes, the indictments of people in the Reagan Administration. Not to mention one ugliness you forgot, that is the ugliness of putting up posters on my (our) public property. If the work of Robbie Conal is merited as art, place it in art studios. I do like some of his work and I think Conal has great potential as an artist.
OPINION
April 9, 2000
I find Robbie Conal's artistic commentary on the Rampart scandal offensive, socially irresponsible, criminal and a political cheap shot to try to obtain public recognition for his mediocre artistic abilities ("Posters Spread Rampart Protest," April 2). I didn't see Conal put up any posters depicting the heroic actions of the Los Angeles police concerning the North Hollywood bank shootings. It takes no great schooling and no great intellect to find fault and to criticize. To be this way is the lazy man's way in obtaining public recognition.
OPINION
January 23, 2010
Art and then some Re "An eye for art — and opportunity," Column One, Jan. 19 The Times' article about Jeffrey Deitch, the Museum of Contemporary Art's new director, compared him to Andy Warhol, mentioning his suit and his hangers-on. A better comparison would have been to Warhol's deep and honest cynicism, exemplified by his well-known line: "Art is what you can get away with." Deitch is fortunate that these are troubled economic times. He should have no trouble filling MOCA with many more beer- and urine-soaked shredded phone books for far less money than he installed at his SoHo gallery.
OPINION
January 16, 2010 | Patt Morrison
I'm always flabbergasted by the foaming fury with which some people regard the painter and guerrilla poster artist Robbie Conal. Over the years, letters-to-the-editor writers have said, "Conal is a cancer on society" and, "He should be behind bars, not in an art gallery." They were mad mostly because of what wasn't in an art gallery. For a quarter of a century, Conal has slapped the powerful in the face by slapping up grotesque caricatures of them in public places. Both George Bushes, Ronald Reagan, Robert McNamara, Al Gore and many more are in Conal's rogues gallery of evildoers.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 16, 2009 | By Scarlet Cheng
Robbie Conal is known for his darkly satiric illustrations of politicians and public figures, often seen as posters slapped up in Los Angeles' public places. When he perceives an abuse of the democratic process, he says, "It's like the thermometer in the cartoon. When the mercury hits above a certain level, above boiling, I pick up a paint brush or a piece of charcoal and I get to work." But another side of him is revealed in the new book "Not Your Typical Political Animal" (Art Attack Press)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 18, 2008
WHY DOES The Times again give publicity to so-called artist Robbie Conal ["Poster Boy for Mischief," by Irene Lacher, Oct. 13]? Over the years, he and his crew have engaged in the illegal activity of plastering posters on utility boxes, poles, fences, etc. throughout the L.A. area. Government agencies have spent considerable sums of taxpayers' money on the poster removal from public property. He should be behind bars, not in an art gallery. Donald McPoland Glendale
ENTERTAINMENT
October 13, 2008 | Irene Lacher, Special to The Times
The MAN in the two-tone Ray-Ban glasses looked familiar, but Lawrence Shapiro couldn't place him. He was cheerfully holding out a box of Italian cookies to anyone walking through the door of Bergamot Station's Track 16 Gallery -- which was where Shapiro happened to find himself -- and his shock of gray hair and youthful bounce twanged something in Shapiro's memory. The cookie bearer introduced himself as Robbie Conal.
NEWS
October 2, 2003 | Elaine Dutka, Times Staff Writer
On a wall in Culver City's Overtones Gallery hangs a series of charcoal on canvas portraits of the famous, ranging from former Florida Secretary of State Katherine Harris to Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld to Microsoft's Bill Gates. Walking in there is not unlike entering "an evil steakhouse," cracks artist Robbie Conal. "I had to restrain myself from taking a marker and inscribing 'Dear Toots, loved my prime ribs ...
OPINION
April 9, 2000
I find Robbie Conal's artistic commentary on the Rampart scandal offensive, socially irresponsible, criminal and a political cheap shot to try to obtain public recognition for his mediocre artistic abilities ("Posters Spread Rampart Protest," April 2). I didn't see Conal put up any posters depicting the heroic actions of the Los Angeles police concerning the North Hollywood bank shootings. It takes no great schooling and no great intellect to find fault and to criticize. To be this way is the lazy man's way in obtaining public recognition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 2, 2000 | MONTE MORIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
A controversial political artist and dozens of cohorts staged an early morning assault Saturday on city bus shelters, utility boxes and construction walls, plastering the objects with hundreds of posters intended to satirize the Rampart Division police scandal. Repeating an exercise that has been characterized as either political commentary or just plain criminal mischief, Mar Vista artist Robbie Conal and friends posted the handbills throughout Los Angeles, specifically targeting City Hall.
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