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March 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Crayons From China Recalled: Federal regulators said yellow and orange crayons imported from China by Los Angeles-based Concord Enterprises were being recalled because they contain hazardous amounts of lead. The Consumer Product Safety Commission said it tested the crayons and found too much lead in those two colors. "Throw these crayons in the trash can or take them back to the store for a refund," CPSC Chairman Ann Brown said in a statement.
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BUSINESS
March 24, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Crayons From China Recalled: Federal regulators said yellow and orange crayons imported from China by Los Angeles-based Concord Enterprises were being recalled because they contain hazardous amounts of lead. The Consumer Product Safety Commission said it tested the crayons and found too much lead in those two colors. "Throw these crayons in the trash can or take them back to the store for a refund," CPSC Chairman Ann Brown said in a statement.
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NEWS
April 6, 1994 | RAY DELGADO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Consumer Product Safety Commission on Tuesday recalled 11 brands of lead-containing crayons imported from China and urged parents who bought them either to throw them away or return them for a refund. Hundreds of thousands of the crayons have been sold at a variety of outlets across the country, the commission said. Three of the brands contain enough lead to pose a poisoning hazard to young children who might eat or chew them.
BUSINESS
March 25, 1994 | DENISE GELLENE
Earlier this week we talked with Ann Brown, the new chairwoman of the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission. She came to the interview with a package of 12 jumbo crayons imported from China by Concord Enterprises of Los Angeles--the first product recalled under her tenure. Although labeled "non-toxic," the yellow and red crayons contain hazardous amounts of lead, Brown said. The crayons may be returned to stores for refunds.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 8, 2002 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In her agonizing daily commute from her Oceanside home to her job at Cal Poly Pomona, Donna Tillman routinely battles the 800-pound gorillas of Southern California freeways: big rigs. "I drive a Toyota, and I feel like a midget among these huge trucks," the business professor said. "You cannot see around them when you are moving from one lane to another." The 18-wheelers are not only big, but they also seem to be reproducing right on the roadways.
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