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REAL ESTATE
June 22, 1997
I enjoyed the "Pardon Our Dust" remodeling story in the Real Estate section ("Little Pink House Grows Up," June 8). I work with many remodels in my work as an engineer. This brings me to my pet peeve: You described a certain size of "cement blocks" being poured under the house to reinforce the upper story. Those were concrete blocks. Cement is only one of the four main ingredients in concrete, the others being sand, gravel and water. PAM FERGUSON
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BUSINESS
March 27, 2014 | By Roger Vincent
In a sign that the definition of prime office space is undergoing a dramatic shift, an old downtown Los Angeles office complex - once considered second rate - is now outperforming many of its newer, glitzier competitors. PacMutual Plaza, which dates to 1908, was one of the best addresses in Southern California until an unprecedented office building boom in the late 1980s and early 1990s brought a stately new crop of skyscrapers to town. For decades to follow, PacMutual - in the same block as the Biltmore hotel in Pershing Square - was a lower-cost alternative to such elite enclaves of corporate America as U.S. Bank Tower, Two California Plaza and the Gas Company Tower.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2014 | By Joel Rubin and Thomas Curwen
The concrete has been poured. That was the word from an enormous hole in the ground in downtown Los Angeles, where crews were cleaning up after a marathon, overnight session building a record-breaking foundation for a future high-rise building. Dubbed the "grand pour," the engineering feat began around 4 p.m. Saturday, when a fleet of more than 200 trucks began hauling in tons of concrete to the construction site at the corner of Figueroa Avenue and Wilshire Boulevard. After about 2,000 truckloads and 20 hours of continuous pouring, workers had laid down more than 21,200 cubic yards of concrete that weighed about 84 million pounds, said Sean Rossall, a spokesman for the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 16, 2014 | By Joel Rubin and Thomas Curwen
The concrete has been poured. That was the word from an enormous hole in the ground in downtown Los Angeles, where crews were cleaning up after a marathon, overnight session building a record-breaking foundation for a future high-rise building. Dubbed the "grand pour," the engineering feat began around 4 p.m. Saturday, when a fleet of more than 200 trucks began hauling in tons of concrete to the construction site at the corner of Figueroa Avenue and Wilshire Boulevard. After about 2,000 truckloads and 20 hours of continuous pouring, workers had laid down more than 21,200 cubic yards of concrete that weighed about 84 million pounds, said Sean Rossall, a spokesman for the project.
NEWS
June 26, 2013 | By Carren Jao
“Warm” and “delicate” are not adjectives commonly associated with concrete, but new lighting and tables from the Los Angeles design studio Wrk-shp ask you to reconsider. Ryan Upton and Airi Isoda, the designers behind Wrk-shp, recently launched their Cylinder Series, a three-piece collection that uses concrete on a more intimate scale. “People think it will be really heavy, but at this scale, concrete is quite light,” said Isoda, who had used cast concrete in her jewelry line.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 15, 1997
Plans for a mall in Carson are way behind schedule, and the property owners are asking the city for permission to dump 775,000 cubic yards of dirt, asphalt and concrete onto the property as landfill to build up the site. The city Planning Commission has studied the proposal and recommended that the request be rejected. The commission meets July 22 to adopt a resolution on the project.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 14, 2002
Those of us opposed to the Lang Dam project appreciate the coverage of our protest on Sunday afternoon and the article "Protesters Bemoan Loss of Oaks for Dam Project." Ventura County Supervisor Frank Schillo called me this morning to tell me the dam is not going to be made of concrete. I told him I would let you know this fact. Thanks again for making our feelings known, even if I was off-base with my facts! Penny Burley Camarillo
MAGAZINE
February 1, 2004 | Susan Heeger
Concrete is the floor of choice for the urban jungle--inexpensive and built to last as long as a Roman road. But because it's ubiquitous and cheap and hard, concrete is sometimes looked down on as a paving, especially in upscale gardens. "When I told people I was going to concrete my yard, they said, 'Oh no!'" says Stefan Smith, a director of commercials and music videos who lives in Venice. A year later, naysayers have come around. "Now that plants are in, it's a softer place," Smith says.
REAL ESTATE
June 12, 1988 | DAVID M. KINCHEN, Times Staff Writer
When Charles Pankow Inc. quotes a price for a construction project, it is set in concrete--and the building itself more often than not is constructed of that material. Celebrating its 25th anniversary this year, the Altadena-based company has grown to the third-largest design/build firm in the nation, with 1987 contracts topping the $425-million mark. The biggest firm in the field last year, according to Building Design and Construction magazine, was Fluor Daniel, Greenville, S.C.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 16, 1989 | CHRIS WILLMAN
The first track on the new Concrete Blonde album is about teen warfare and the toll exacted by urban violence. The second song is about the hyperactive hypocrisy of the cocaine and speed generation. And the third is about the love of money, money, money, muhnee. . . . Too bad the title "Los Angeles" already has been taken. Like the great band X before it, the slightly more mainstream Concrete Blonde speaks for its city in a time of transition, uniting fears of social ills and the dread of personal commitment in one pretty, supremely emotive package.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2014 | By Corina Knoll and Thomas Curwen
What is being billed as the world's largest continuous concrete pour will kick off Saturday afternoon in downtown Los Angeles with a parade featuring concrete trucks, members of the USC marching band, mayor Eric Garcetti and other elected officials. Local bars also plan to feature a drink dubbed “The Longest Pour.” The procession is scheduled to begin just before 4 p.m. and last about 20 hours, said a spokesman for the New Wilshire Grand project , which is slated to rise 1,100 feet and become the tallest structure west of the Mississippi.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 15, 2014 | By Thomas Curwen
Starting at 5 p.m. Saturday, more than 2,000 truckloads of concrete will be driven through downtown L.A. as workers begin building what promises to be the tallest structure west of the Mississippi. The concrete pouring project at the New Wilshire Grand site is expected to last nearly 20 hours. Wilshire Boulevard and 7th and Figueroa streets in the vicinity of the construction site will be closed from noon Saturday to 10 p.m. Sunday. Visitors can take in the bright lights and the armada of trucks from the sidewalks of Figueroa Street and Wilshire Boulevard.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Doug Smith and Rosanna Xia
Santa Monica will become the first city in California to inspect concrete, steel and wood-frame buildings and require seismic retrofitting for those deemed vulnerable during a major earthquake. The city will spend more than $100,000 over the next year identifying potentially dangerous buildings, then property owners must show they are safe or fix them. City officials said they would determine over the next few months how much time the owners have to complete the retrofitting. The survey is expected to cover hundreds of buildings, including steel office towers, older concrete buildings and wood multistory apartment houses that dot the city.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | By Thomas Curwen
The latest addition to the Los Angeles skyline - the New Wilshire Grand, the tallest structure to be built west of the Mississippi - takes a major step forward Saturday when more than 2,000 truckloads of concrete are driven through downtown for what is being billed as the world's largest continuous concrete pour. The slurry-fest begins at 5 p.m. and is expected to last nearly 20 hours. Wilshire Boulevard and 7th and Figueroa streets in the vicinity of the construction site will be closed from noon Saturday to 10 p.m. Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 2014
Join Times staff writer Rosanna Xia for a discussion at 9 a.m. Monday about the University of California's release of data  on nearly 1,500 older concrete buildings across Los Angeles. The release of the data marks a key step in L.A.'s efforts to improve earthquake safety, but there's a tough road ahead. The list was compiled over several years, a first-of-its kind effort to identify a type of building that experts have long said pose the greatest risk of death.  Of all the older  concrete buildings  in Los Angeles, the researchers estimated about 75 would collapse during a huge quake.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 25, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia and Doug Smith
The University of California's release of data on nearly 1,500 older concrete buildings across Los Angeles marks a key step in the city's efforts to improve earthquake safety. Now the hard part begins. UC researchers spent several years compiling the list of buildings, a first-of-its-kind effort to help identify a type of building that earthquake experts have long said poses the greatest risk of death. Of all the older concrete buildings in Los Angeles, the researchers estimated that only about 75 would collapse during a huge quake.
BUSINESS
June 27, 2010 | By Darrell Satzman
A critically acclaimed contemporary home designed by Eric Owen Moss has come on the market for the first time in Brentwood. Featured in books, magazines and television shows, the Lawson/Westen House is a geometric amalgamation of concrete, steel, glass and wood highlighted by a three-story truncated cone that rises over the kitchen. Moss, director of the Southern California Institute of Architecture, conceived the cylindrical Gateway Art Tower and other structures in Culver City's Hayden Tract, and his Los Angeles firm has designed museums, theaters and commercial buildings across the globe.
HOME & GARDEN
October 24, 2009 | Debra Prinzing
If Stephanie Bartron has her way, California's sea of patio concrete is going to start shrinking. When the Los Angeles landscape designer eyed her clients' slab behind a 1940s Atwater Village bungalow, she knew the concrete had to go. New hardscape and plants would have done the trick, sure, but digging out all that paving was costly, and the waste would just end up in the landfill. So, Bartron took a different approach. She hired a professional industrial saw operator to slice up the 20-by-20-foot patio into a grid of 18-inch squares.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 17, 2014 | By Rong-Gong Lin II, Rosanna Xia and Doug Smith
In a reversal, University of California researchers will give Los Angeles officials the addresses of about 1,500 old concrete buildings that are potentially at risk of collapse during a major earthquake. The move, announced Friday, is significant because it will provide the city with a starting point in its effort to identify concrete buildings most likely to fail in a quake and take steps to strengthen the structures. The researchers, who spent several years studying the issue, estimate that about 75 of the 1,500 buildings on the list could collapse in a large temblor.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 24, 2013 | Bob Pool
Leon Rudek loved his newspaper job so much that he constructed a sidewalk in front of his house out of front pages. Pedestrians walking along La Prada Street in Highland Park step back in time as they pass by concrete "editions" of newspapers reporting the news that "Yankees KO Dodgers, Again," or "Argentina Invades Falklands" and "How Carter Saved Summit. " All in screaming headlines. And those who take a closer look may notice that dozens of the front pages cover the bottom of the slope behind his house, and hundreds more serve as roofing shingles on the garage-workshop.
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