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BUSINESS
September 24, 1996 | ALLAN KREDA, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The eve of the Jewish New Year, Rosh Hashana, was once a time of tears for women like Morris Gold's mother and grandmother. Rosh Hashana meant gefilte fish, and gefilte fish meant horseradish--the powerful condiment that stings the eyes and clears the sinuses. Gold, 77, recalls watching the women of the family sitting on milk crates by the window of their Brooklyn apartment, peeling and cutting up horseradish and beets. And crying.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 24, 2013 | By Caitlin Keller
Science and Food: On Thursday, Alice Waters of Chez Panisse and the Edible Schoolyard will be heading to UCLA where she, along with chef David Binkle, director of food services for the L.A. Unified School District, and Dr. Wendy Slusser, professor of pediatrics at UCLA, will discuss school lunches and edible gardens at “Edible Education,” the second event in UCLA's "Science and Food" public lecture series. The lecture will begin at 7 p.m. at Royce Hall Auditorium. Tickets are $25 and available online or at the UCLA Central Ticket Office.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2003
New Yorkers "possess the innate ability to walk, talk and eat pizza while crossing a street," gushes Geraldine Baum ("Springtime Served Warm, With Relish," March 31). Wow! Talk about super powers! That sure beats the lowly feat of shaving while eating breakfast and talking on your cell phone on the 405. Baum lays some more amazing New York uniqueness on us: "There is nothing like the sublime pleasure of standing under [Sabrett hot dog wagons'] yellow and blue umbrellas and ordering a dog ($1.50)
FOOD
May 13, 2010 | By Jenn Garbee, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Viola Rowland's jalapeño jelly, mango chutney and corn relish started making the rounds at swanky Hollywood cocktail parties in the early 1930s. Actors Doris Day and Dan Duryea, cosmetics magnate Max Factor and Los Angeles Examiner Hollywood gossip columnist Louella Parsons hired the private cook to dollop her spicy-sweet condiments on cream cheese-topped toasts and seafood canapés. Today, her granddaughter, Nancy Rowland, is carrying on the local cocktail condiment tradition with her own versions of her grandmother's recipes.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1992 | MARY GUTHRIE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The nation's economic problems are taking a bite out of California's pickle business, as the state's largest pickle producer announced Thursday that it will shut its plant in City of Industry and move its pickle packing out of the state. The plant, which is southeast of downtown Los Angeles, has the most excess capacity of all the company's factories, said Vlasic Foods Inc. spokesman Kevin Lowery.
NATIONAL
October 11, 2002 | STEPHANIE SIMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Behold, mustard: Basil pesto mustard and merlot chocolate mustard. Lemon peppercorn mustard and bourbon molasses mustard. Curried apricot. Martini. Key lime macadamia mustard. Mustard in jars, in tubes, in pots. Mustard from Azerbaijan and mustard from Zimbabwe. Mustard seeds, mustard rubs. Mustard ointments galore.
NEWS
January 17, 1997 | PETER Y. HONG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Without knowing it, you might be among the millions of Americans burned by David Tran. And if so, you probably liked it. A diminutive, balding man who comes to work in coveralls, Tran is known to few beyond his family and 15 workers at his Rosemead hot sauce factory. But his fiery red sriracha (sree-rah-chah) relish, packaged in a green-topped clear-plastic squeeze bottle that looks like it was meant to hold glue, has captured the hearts and minds of spicy-food fans from Fresno to France.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 14, 1989 | Max Jacobson
It's 5 o'clock on a Saturday night--opening time at Pinnacle Peak in Garden Grove--and the Western-style steak pit already has a long line of families waiting outside the door. Pickups, trailers, RVs and several Mercedeses line the dusty parking lot. A smoky smell from the mesquite grill wafts through the restaurant's wooden doors; I can tell we are in for some serious beef. The dining room, filled with Western memorabilia, is like a folksy log cabin, and to say the atmosphere is casual is an understatement.
FOOD
March 28, 2007 | Charles Perry
Colatura, the traditional anchovy sauce of Cetara on the Sorrento Peninsula, is a powerful condiment -- just a few drops will give a dish a rich savor. That's fortunate, because this handmade product is in limited supply. It's mostly sold in one-tenth-liter (3.38-ounce) bottles. Two of the four brands recognized by the Friends of the Anchovy (Amici delle Alici) in Cetara are available online. Nettuno di Giordano is $22 a bottle at www.amazon.com, $25 at www.gustiamo.
FOOD
June 27, 1999 | DONNA DEANE
This handy little wire basket holds the fixings for your holiday barbecue. The lid of each pot has a spreader attached for easy dipping and serving of ketchup, mustard and relish. Condiment set $24.95 from Global Gourmet, Orange. Suntory Teas Japan-based Suntory has a new line of bottled Oolong iced teas. The two fruit-flavored teas, raspberry and lemon, are sweetened. The lightly brewed and fully brewed Oolong teas are unsweetened. All are light and refreshing when served over ice.
FOOD
July 1, 2009 | Sonoko Sakai
"When I slurp a bowl of somen noodles it becomes a summer breeze." I am at the Granada Market, the neighborhood mom-and-pop grocery in West Los Angeles where I get my Japanese staples. The fish counter looks cheerful with roses and dahlias from the owner's garden in empty milk bottles. A samurai saga is playing on satellite television. The volume is a tad too high, but I don't complain because it's part of the funky atmosphere here that has comforted me for more than 20 years.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 8, 2009 | My-Thuan Tran
Bruce Lindsay knew a good bargain when he saw one: For decades, the millionaire ate three square meals a day in the cafeteria of tiny Vanguard University in Costa Mesa, surrounded by students who called him the "campus grandpa." When he passed away last month at 79, the college learned just what a generous tip he had left.
IMAGE
March 30, 2008 | Monica Corcoran, Times Staff Writer
Q: I peeled 15 garlic cloves, cut up two fennel bulbs and sliced two sweet Meyer lemons into transparent circles and tucked them gently under the skin of two perfect Cornish hens. I served each hen with a tender, organic green salad and toast points of a fresh, rustic loaf of bread. Then, my dinner guest -- a friend for more than 12 years -- pulled the ketchup bottle out of the fridge!
FOOD
March 28, 2007 | Charles Perry
Colatura, the traditional anchovy sauce of Cetara on the Sorrento Peninsula, is a powerful condiment -- just a few drops will give a dish a rich savor. That's fortunate, because this handmade product is in limited supply. It's mostly sold in one-tenth-liter (3.38-ounce) bottles. Two of the four brands recognized by the Friends of the Anchovy (Amici delle Alici) in Cetara are available online. Nettuno di Giordano is $22 a bottle at www.amazon.com, $25 at www.gustiamo.
NEWS
September 3, 2006 | Patrick T. Reardon, Chicago Tribune
Saw the sign while barreling along U.S. Highway 18. "Mustard Museum." Had to turn off and see. Mustard Museum? Color scheme? Yellow, of course. Even down to the highly buffed blond wood floor of the former hardware store. Officially, the Mount Horeb Mustard Museum. Entered the commercial half of the operation, where 450 to 500 types of mustard were on sale along with T-shirts, caps, toilet seats, surgical scrubs, playing cards, sweatshirts and diplomas for Poupon U.
BUSINESS
December 30, 2003 | Jerry Hirsch, Times Staff Writer
Like millions nationwide, Craig Makela will be ringing in the new year with the traditional champagne toast. Before the clock strikes midnight, though, he and his guests will be closing out 2003 with a perennial favorite: martinis. At Makela's house in Santa Barbara, the martinis will be dressed up with olives. That make sense, because Makela's family has grown olives in nearby Gaviota for more than 150 years. And lately, America's cocktail craze has his tiny Santa Barbara Olive Co. drinking in strong sales of its more than 100 condiments, from green olives stuffed with pickled onions for martini lovers who can't decide to spicy asparagus spears as celery alternatives in Bloody Marys.
IMAGE
March 30, 2008 | Monica Corcoran, Times Staff Writer
Q: I peeled 15 garlic cloves, cut up two fennel bulbs and sliced two sweet Meyer lemons into transparent circles and tucked them gently under the skin of two perfect Cornish hens. I served each hen with a tender, organic green salad and toast points of a fresh, rustic loaf of bread. Then, my dinner guest -- a friend for more than 12 years -- pulled the ketchup bottle out of the fridge!
FOOD
August 26, 1998 | DONNA DEANE
This easy-to-prepare vegetable salad makes a light accompaniment for grilled fish, chicken or lean pork. The base of the no-oil dressing is chutney. The lime juice, garlic and chili powder help balance the sweetness of the chutney. Drizzle it over the salad just before serving. Deane is director of The Times Test Kitchen.
NATIONAL
October 1, 2003 | From Associated Press
A 2-year-old girl survived on ketchup, mustard and dried pasta for nearly three weeks after she was left home alone while her mother was being held in jail, authorities said Tuesday. The child was recovering from malnutrition and was listed in good condition Tuesday at Wolfson Children's Hospital. "She's sitting up in the bed and laughing and playing with the nurses," said hospital spokesman David Foreman.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 5, 2003
New Yorkers "possess the innate ability to walk, talk and eat pizza while crossing a street," gushes Geraldine Baum ("Springtime Served Warm, With Relish," March 31). Wow! Talk about super powers! That sure beats the lowly feat of shaving while eating breakfast and talking on your cell phone on the 405. Baum lays some more amazing New York uniqueness on us: "There is nothing like the sublime pleasure of standing under [Sabrett hot dog wagons'] yellow and blue umbrellas and ordering a dog ($1.50)
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