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NATIONAL
August 15, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- A 5-year-old boy was recovering from a broken leg Thursday after he became frightened while riding a kiddie roller coaster at Coney Island, wriggled his way out of the car he was in, and fell. Witnesses said the little boy, whose name was not released, became wedged between the track and the cars of the Sea Serpent ride. Deno's Wonder Wheel, which operates some of the rides on the boardwalk at Coney Island, said the bright green Sea Serpent -- a ride designed for young children -- had never had an accident in its 15 years in operation.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
In "Zipper: Coney Island's Last Wild Ride," documentarian Amy Nicholson puts a human face on the deterioration of the iconic New York amusement park by focusing on the fate of her favorite ride. Consisting of a rotating boom orbited by free-flipping cars, the 38-year-old Zipper was operated by Eddie Miranda. Ambitious development plans and greedy land-grabbers have been pushing Miranda and many of his fellow carnies out of business, rendering "America's Playground" a wasteland of dilapidated buildings and deserted parking lots - even before Hurricane Sandy ripped through.
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ENTERTAINMENT
August 3, 1986 | JANICE ARKATOV
Loved "Women Behind Bars"? Then you'll probably enjoy the equally raucous antics in Tom Eyen's "Why Hanna's Skirt Won't Stay Down," opening Saturday at the Coast Playhouse. Originally introduced in 1965 as a one-act at New York's La Mama and Caffe Chino, Eyen (a Tony winner for "Dreamgirls") later added two companion pieces--on Hanna's sisters, Sophie and Gilda. Since then, Sophie has joined Hanna in the current incarnation, which played New York in 1971 and 1983.
NATIONAL
August 15, 2013 | By Tina Susman
NEW YORK -- A 5-year-old boy was recovering from a broken leg Thursday after he became frightened while riding a kiddie roller coaster at Coney Island, wriggled his way out of the car he was in, and fell. Witnesses said the little boy, whose name was not released, became wedged between the track and the cars of the Sea Serpent ride. Deno's Wonder Wheel, which operates some of the rides on the boardwalk at Coney Island, said the bright green Sea Serpent -- a ride designed for young children -- had never had an accident in its 15 years in operation.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 15, 2000 | KEVIN THOMAS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
"Went to Coney Island on a Mission From God . . . Be Back by Five" re-teams director/co-writer Richard Schenkman and actor/co-writer Jon Cryer, who first joined forces on the romantic comedy "The Pompatus of Love." This time they're in a more serious mood, which is not to say this deeply felt, engaging little film is without humor, although it confronts a great deal of pain and loss. Cryer's Daniel and Rick Stear's Stan are lifelong friends in a working-class New York neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 14, 1986 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
In bringing to the screen his unabashedly sentimental, nostalgia-drenched 1968 play "The Goodbye People" (at the Beverly Center Cineplex) Herb Gardner has succeeded only in embalming it. Unfortunately, despite a splendid cast, the decayed, desolate stretch of Coney Island that serves as its sole backdrop is so palpably real that it merely makes everything that happens in front of it seem all the more artificial and stage-bound.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 29, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
In "Zipper: Coney Island's Last Wild Ride," documentarian Amy Nicholson puts a human face on the deterioration of the iconic New York amusement park by focusing on the fate of her favorite ride. Consisting of a rotating boom orbited by free-flipping cars, the 38-year-old Zipper was operated by Eddie Miranda. Ambitious development plans and greedy land-grabbers have been pushing Miranda and many of his fellow carnies out of business, rendering "America's Playground" a wasteland of dilapidated buildings and deserted parking lots - even before Hurricane Sandy ripped through.
NEWS
May 28, 1996 | Associated Press
A Coney Island roller coaster was closed for inspection Sunday after the two-car ride jumped the tracks and hit a pole, injuring two passengers. The bolts on a rear wheel on the first car of the Jumbo Jet coaster came off late Saturday night. Witnesses said the derailment happened near the end of the ride. "If we were at the top, right now I'd be dead," said Alfredo Dominquez, 27, who was treated at a hospital for bruises.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 1991 | IRV LETOFSKY
History is coming around again, bigger than ever. It wasn't always fun the first time, as in the War Between the States, replayed in the rousing documentary series, "The Civil War." But a new production on an old amazement, "Coney Island," revives a more delicious era. Airing at 9 tonight on Channels 28 and 15 as an episode of "The American Experience" series, it's another achievement by one of the newly lionized Burns boys, in this case Ric Burns, brother of Ken of "Civil War" celebrity.
NEWS
December 11, 1988 | HOWARD KURTZ, The Washington Post
John Dorman is as much a Coney Island landmark as the boardwalk and the Ferris wheel. For 41 years, this gray-haired man dressed in a perpetually stained white jacket has dispensed chocolate fudge, candy apples, saltwater taffy, cotton candy and other homemade treats from a small shop at the base of one of Brooklyn's most decrepit and foul-smelling subway stations. Now, the sweet saga of Philip's Candy Store may be coming to a bitter end.
OPINION
July 4, 2013 | By Bruce Kraig
Between Memorial Day and Labor Day, about 7 billion hot dogs will be consumed in the United States. On the Fourth of July alone, 150 million will be gobbled by Americans celebrating the birth of the nation. Not that the Founding Fathers polished off batches of them after putting the final touches on the Declaration of Independence. Hot dogs as we know them today did not exist until nearly 100 years later. But they really are an American creation, and in a way the product of social and economic forces that the founders unleashed, wittingly or otherwise.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 23, 2012 | By Irene Lacher
Pulitzer Prize-winning playwright Donald Margulies talks about his inspiration for his new play, "Coney Island Christmas," which runs through Dec. 30 at the Geffen Playhouse. Tell me about "Coney Island Christmas. " "Coney Island Christmas" originated as a commission by the late Gil Cates, who was the artistic director of the Geffen Playhouse and a friend of mine. He called me a few years ago and asked me if I would be interested in writing a Christmas play. He was hoping to create something that he hoped would become a theatrical tradition at the Geffen.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 3, 2012 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Christmas obviously isn't for everyone, but it's pretty hard to avoid even if your plan for the 25th involves Chinese food and a movie. Stores break out the decorations right after Halloween, and as for the theater, it's wall to wall productions of "A Christmas Carol" as soon as the Thanksgiving leftovers are finished. It's enough to put even a Noel-loving drama critic in a "Bah, humbug!" mood. Fortunately, two notable alternatives to the standard holiday fare have arrived to spice up the season: The Second City's "A Christmas Carol: Twist Your Dickens!"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2011
Murray Handwerker Nathan's Famous owner expanded nationwide Murray Handwerker, 89, who turned Nathan's Famous, the Coney Island hot dog stand founded by his father, into a national franchise, died May 14 at his home in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla. He suffered from dementia, said his son, Bill. Handwerker was born in New York City on July 25, 1921, five years after his Polish-immigrant father, Nathan Handwerker, opened the hot dog stand. The younger Handwerker later said he "grew up behind the griddle" at the stand that became a Coney Island landmark.
TRAVEL
February 4, 2011 | By Jason S. Mandell, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The odd coupling of tradition and trendiness that characterizes Brooklyn's Williamsburg neighborhood is perhaps nowhere more evident than at Full Circle Bar, a watering hole on a quiet block that dead-ends at an expressway. Here, young urbanites, who welcome the competition (and the shelter from the snow), are carrying on a century-old New York pastime whose extinction, until recently, seemed inevitable. The pastime? Skee-ball, a contest played at breezy boardwalk arcades by generations of New Yorkers.
FOOD
January 6, 2010
We're getting used to spices in beer, such as the coriander in Belgian witbier and the fruitcake spices in Christmas ales. This one makes a quite different choice, ginger and fennel, along with the dash of orange peel that's been showing up in a lot of ales. But here's the thing: It's not an ale -- it's a crisp lager, so the spices are out there on their own, not supported by the forgiving musk of ale flavors. So it has a straw-yellow color with a moderate head and a grassy (three kinds of hops in there)
NATIONAL
July 30, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
The New York City Council voted overwhelmingly for Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg's plan to turn Coney Island into a year-round waterfront destination with high-rise hotels, restaurants, retail stores, movie theaters and the city's first new roller coaster since the Cyclone was built in 1927. But developer Joseph Sitt has not agreed to sell his 10.5 acres at the heart of the project. If he refuses, the city would have to consider seizing it by eminent domain.
NEWS
July 31, 1995 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
A Coney Island thrill ride mishap mangled a 24-year-old woman's leg and left 13 other people with sprains and cuts. Shrieks and shouts followed a thunderous boom as those waiting to enter the Hell Hole ride--consisting of a cylinder that spins so fast it pins people to its walls while the floor drops--fled the steel-and-wood structure. "You heard that sound, you knew something was wrong," said Joe Englebert, who was working at a nearby stall.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 9, 2009 | David Ng
"Love Never Dies," the long-awaited musical sequel to "The Phantom of the Opera," officially has an opening date. Andrew Lloyd Webber said Thursday that the musical will first open in London at the Adelphi Theatre on March 9. And it will open on Broadway on Nov. 11, 2010, at an as-yet-unnamed theater. Set in Coney Island in New York, "Love Never Dies" picks up 10 years after the story of "Phantom," as the title character moves from his lair in the Paris Opera House to the fairgrounds of the popular Long Island locale.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 30, 2009 | Steve Chawkins
Michael Jackson was never a fixture on the county fair circuit, but his Neverland rides now are on a never-ending tour. The attractions he set up in his estate's private amusement park have been auctioned off and are being trucked from carnival to carnival, pitched as a chance to take a spin on a piece of history. At the far end of the midway at the Tulare County Fair in the Central Valley this month, signs announced: "Michael ride here! This is one of Michael Jackson's rides from Neverland Ranch!"
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