Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCongo
IN THE NEWS

Congo

FEATURED ARTICLES
OPINION
July 26, 2010
Embedded in the financial reform President Obama signed into law last week was a truly historic regulatory provision — one that doesn't pertain to Wall Street but to the Democratic Republic of Congo. In an effort to choke off funding for the armed thugs and rebel militias that have killed more than 5 million people and turned Congo into the rape capital of the world, the new law will require thousands of U.S. companies to disclose whether their products contain minerals from rebel-controlled mines.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
January 2, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - For nearly two decades, warfare in the eastern Democratic Republic of Congo has resulted in millions of deaths and cast the resource-rich region as the world capital of rape and crimes against humanity. One reason for the epidemic of violence is the greed that goes along with the gold, tin and coltan mined from its steep, green hillsides. An additional factor is the military interference by neighbors to the east, Rwanda and Uganda. Yet there's also an underlying cause that is rarely addressed: land rights, and conflicts over it, problems as enduring as the soil under one's feet, analysts say, complicated by factors present in so many of Africa's conflicts: years of chaos, fighting and displacement.
Advertisement
OPINION
March 15, 2012
Nobody ever made a viral video about Thomas Lubanga. Unlike Joseph Kony, a similarly despicable African warlord who also recruited child soldiers to carry out a campaign of rape, murder and mutilation and is now the subject of the fastest-spreading video in Internet history, Lubanga's dirty work went largely unnoticed in the West. Also unlike the still-at-large Kony, Lubanga is about to face justice for his crimes. Lubanga, the head of a rebel militia that fought a devastating ethnic war in the Democratic Republic of Congo, on Wednesday had the distinction of being the first person convicted by the International Criminal Court, a decade-old institution that has been in equal measures an inspiration and a disappointment for human rights advocates.
WORLD
December 30, 2013 | By Erin Conway-Smith
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - A series of attacks in the Democratic Republic of Congo's capital left dozens of people dead Monday as the army fought off assailants identified as followers of a disgruntled religious leader. The coordinated attacks, at first thought to be a coup attempt, targeted a state television station, the airport and a military base in Kinshasa, the capital. Gunfire was also reported in Lubumbashi, the country's second-largest city and capital of mineral-rich Katanga province.
SCIENCE
September 13, 2012 | By Jon Bardin, Los Angeles Times
For only the second time in the last 28 years, scientists have discovered a new species of monkey, according to a new report in this week's edition of the scientific journal PLoS ONE. The monkey species, called lesula by locals, lives deep in the remote Lomami forest of the Democratic Republic of Congo. The monkey's habitat is one of few remaining unexplored biological frontiers in the area. Though researchers were previously unfamiliar with the species -- which has an extremely human-like face surrounded by golden hair -- the daughter of a local school director in the area had taken one as a pet. That led to a first chance encounter between the scientists and the monkey in 2007 when a field team saw it tied to a post in the village where she lived.
WORLD
December 23, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
From a Honduras tycoon to the Benghazi attacks, here are five stories you shouldn't miss from this past week in global news: Panel faults security failures in Benghazi attacks In Honduras, a controversial tycoon responds to critics In Israel, Labor Party chief's shift to the right causes dissent U.S. under pressure over Rwanda involvement in Congo fighting Philippine Congress OKs bill to offer birth control to poor...
WORLD
January 1, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
In a bid to quell violence in the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the United Nations Security Council imposed an arms embargo late Monday on two armed groups accused of rape and mass killings. The decision came just before Rwanda, which has been accused of backing the rebels, temporarily joined the powerful council. The country has fervently denied involvement in the Congo crisis, but U.N. experts and human rights groups say its fingerprints are evident in the recent bloodshed.
WORLD
November 19, 2012 | By Emily Alpert
Reports of escalating clashes in the eastern Democratic Republic of the Congo raised renewed fears of outright war Monday, as rebels again neared the provincial capital of Goma. The M23 rebels had pledged to halt their push toward Goma in order to negotiate, but government officials shot down the idea of talks, saying they were useless because Rwanda was pulling the strings behind the scenes. New violence erupted on the outskirts of Goma only hours after rebels made their pledge, the Associated Press reported.
WORLD
August 29, 2002 | From Associated Press
Uganda and Zimbabwe have begun their pledged troop withdrawals from Congo, a rare concrete step toward ending Central Africa's four-year, six-nation war, the United Nations confirmed Wednesday. Both nations--enemies in the Congo war--have pulled out hundreds of troops in recent days, U.N. mission spokesman Hamadoun Toure said here in the Congolese capital. "We hope all the parties will do the same.
WORLD
August 30, 2007 | From the Associated Press
More than 100 people have died in a remote part of Congo, including all those who attended the funerals of two village chiefs, in what health officials fear is an outbreak of hemorrhagic fever. People began dying of the suspected fever after the funerals in Mweka, a region of southeastern Congo where relatives usually wash the bodies of the deceased, said Jean-Constatin Kanow, chief medical inspector for the province.
WORLD
November 5, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Congo's M23 rebels, the latest in a succession of militias responsible for horrific attacks on civilians in the east of the country, effectively surrendered Tuesday when they announced that they were laying down their arms and disbanding. The announcement comes after the Democratic Republic of Congo's army heavily bombarded two hills overnight, Chanzu and Runyonyi, the last rebel strongholds. In recent days the rebels abandoned a swath of territory, including many towns and villages, after being overpowered by Congolese army attacks.
WORLD
November 2, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Their behavior was scandalous: Soldiers traded their guns for gold. They sexually abused children they were supposed to protect. They barricaded themselves in their barracks rather than fight. And that unruly U.N. peacekeeping force was actually the better of the two armies fighting a notorious rebel movement in eastern Congo, scene of one of Africa's longest-running conflicts. Meantime, the Congolese army's efforts were led by rival commanders who competed for looting rights.
WORLD
October 30, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa - Congolese troops backed by a U.N. force on Wednesday drove insurgents from the M23 group from their last stronghold in eastern Congo, raising hopes that the government might defeat the rebels and begin to bring some stability to the troubled region. Bertrand Bisimwa, civilian leader with the M23 rebels, reportedly fled across the border into Uganda, with Congolese officials calling on authorities there to hand him over. The fall of Bunagana, the rebels' headquarters, follows intense fighting in the eastern reaches of the Democratic Republic of Congo after the collapse of peace talks last week over M23's demands that its leaders receive amnesty.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Annlee Ellingson
Like father, like son. "2 Jacks," Bernard Rose's cleverly faithful adaptation of Leo Tolstoy's short story "Two Hussars," takes place over the course of two wild nights in Hollywood. In the first, presented mostly in black and white except for some whimsical tinted accents, legendary director Jack Hussar (Danny Huston) sweeps into town to raise money for his next picture, which he's shooting in the Belgian Congo. Apparently penniless, with a reputation for making movies that don't make any money, he skates by on the goodwill of sycophants in a Hollywood version of how Hollywood works.
WORLD
October 10, 2013 | By Carol J. Williams
M23 rebels in the lawless eastern reaches of the Democratic Republic of Congo have built alliances with local gangs to gain control of lucrative gold mines and smuggle out $500 million a year of the precious metal to finance their brutal attacks, a Washington-based human rights group reported Thursday. Despite M23 leader Bosco Ntaganda's surrender to war crimes investigators in The Hague this year, his co-commander has succeeded in reviving a brisk trade in "conflict minerals," according to the report by Enough, which bills its mission as ending genocide and crimes against humanity.
WORLD
July 15, 2013 | By Robyn Dixon
JOHANNESBURG, South Africa -- In the far east of the Democratic Republic of Congo, residents were greeted with an odd sight over the weekend: trucks full of people dressed in brightly colored women's clothes, coming from Rwanda. They weren't women. They were armed men in military uniforms with scarves called kikwembe draped over their heads and clothing. A farmer who saw them felt dread when he realized who they were, the Associated Press reported. They were soldiers, apparently arriving from Rwanda to fight on the side of the M23 rebels.
WORLD
December 1, 2004 | From Associated Press
Senior Congolese officials charged Tuesday that Rwandan troops had crossed into eastern Congo and were clashing with militias there. Residents fleeing the fighting reported that 15 villagers were dead and three villages were burned. United Nations officials said they were investigating the invasion charges, which came as Rwandan President Paul Kagame told his country's parliament that Rwandan troops "might" already be in Congo, pursuing Rwandan rebels based there.
WORLD
February 3, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Days of clashes between security forces and demonstrators claiming electoral fraud have left nearly 100 people dead in southwestern Congo, humanitarian and rights groups said Friday. Demonstrators rampaged through the town of Moanda, setting fire to police posts and several government buildings, prompting security forces to intervene, said Willy Iboma, who heads the local Foundation for the Defense of Children's Rights. The soldiers used automatic weapons and rockets, he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 9, 2013 | By Charles McNulty, Los Angeles Times Theater Critic
Actors' Gang stalwart Brian T. Finney invites us to once again venture deep into the interior of the African Congo in his adaptation of Joseph Conrad's "Heart of Darkness," now at the Ivy Substation. This stripped-down Actors' Gang production zooms in on Finney's intensely contained performance as Marlow, the seaman who tells the story of his obsessive pursuit of the mysterious Kurtz, an ivory trader who has come to symbolize, among other things, the insatiable greed of imperial conquest.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 7, 2013 | By Kenneth Turan, Los Angeles Times Film Critic
The powerful things we expect from "War Witch" are as advertised, but what we don't expect is even better. Given that the subject matter is two violent years in the life of an African child soldier, it's not surprising that the film's events are disturbing and even horrific. But it's the unforeseen way they're told that makes "War Witch" potent enough to have been one of the five nominees for the foreign language Oscar and the big winner, including best picture, at Canada's recent film awards.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|