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NEWS
May 25, 1990 | Associated Press
President Bush will name Thomas Simons Jr., a former State Department official, as ambassador to Poland, succeeding John R. Davis Jr., the White House has announced. Bush also will name William B. Milam as ambassador to Bangladesh and James Daniel Phillips as ambassador to the Congo.
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WORLD
August 12, 2007 | From Reuters
Congo has suspended Tutsi-led military operations against Rwandan Hutu rebels in an effort to avoid further ethnic tension in the country's east, a senior army official said Saturday. At least 165,000 civilians have fled fighting in North Kivu province since February, when army brigades commanded by Tutsis began operations to drive out Rwandan rebels. Congo's ground commander Gen. Gabriel Amisi told journalists in North Kivu that the decision was made after consultation with the U.N.
NEWS
August 21, 1992 | Reuters
Pascal Lissouba, a geneticist and former Marxist prime minister, Thursday became the first democratically elected president of Congo since its independence from France more than 30 years ago. The national electoral commission said final results of the presidential election showed that Lissouba, 61, won 61.3% of the vote, compared to 38.7% for his anti-Communist rival, Bernard Kolelas.
NEWS
June 16, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
The U.N. Security Council voted unanimously to extend for a year the peacekeeping mission in Congo in hopes of overseeing the withdrawal of foreign forces and disarming combatants. U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan can decide at any time over the next year to increase the number of peacekeepers to their authorized strength of 5,537 troops and military observers, up from 2,366, the resolution said.
WORLD
December 2, 2004 | From Associated Press
U.N. observers encountered what they believed to be about 100 Rwandan troops in eastern Congo, a U.N. official said Wednesday, marking the first reported sighting by the United Nations since Rwanda threatened to send forces against Rwandan Hutu rebels sheltering here. The suspected Rwandan troops withdrew toward Rwanda after Tuesday's encounter, M'Hand Ladjouzi, head of the U.N. mission at Goma, said at a news conference.
WORLD
May 22, 2003 | From Reuters
The mutilated bodies of 280 people have been found in the town of Bunia in eastern Congo after days of fighting between tribal militias, a U.N. official said Wednesday. The U.N. has called for an emergency peacekeeping force in the region, where youths armed with spears, knives and bows and arrows have been battling since early May. Britain and France have said they would consider joining the force.
NEWS
October 17, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Archenemies in Congo's war traded angry words at the start of peace talks, showing little inclination to make the compromises that a desperate population is praying will end three years of fighting. Rebels, government officials, political parties and civic groups are meeting in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, to try to end a war believed to have claimed more than 1 million lives.
WORLD
November 21, 2008 | A Times Staff Writer
The U.N. Security Council on Thursday authorized increasing the number of peacekeepers in the Democratic Republic of Congo by as many as 2,785 military personnel and 300 police. Now it's up to the United Nations peacekeeping operations to recruit volunteers from among the armed forces of member states. The majority of the 17,000 soldiers already in the region are Indian or Pakistani.
WORLD
January 16, 2005 | From Reuters
Five of the few northern white rhinoceroses left in the wild will be evacuated from Congo to prevent poachers from wiping them out, conservationists said Saturday. Fewer than 10 of the rhinos are believed to remain in the wild and with heavily armed poachers carrying out frequent raids in northeastern Congo, flying the animals to sanctuary in Kenya is deemed the only option to guarantee their survival.
WORLD
December 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
The Democratic Republic of Congo's war-weary citizens voted in the first national ballot in more than three decades Sunday, deciding on a draft constitution meant to put the country on the path to democracy and lasting peace. About 24 million people in the central African nation were registered to vote on the charter, which would grant greater autonomy to mineral-laden regions but was viewed by many as another attempt by corrupt politicians to enrich themselves.
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