Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCongress
IN THE NEWS

Congress

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 2, 1998
This last Congress was not a "do-nothing Congress" at all. It was a "very-busybody Congress." MARY M. MORABITO Temple City
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 25, 2014 | Lisa Mascaro
WASHINGTON -- The push-pull of immigration reform is intensifying as Congress prepares to return to work for one of the last few legislative sessions before the midterm elections. The window for Congress to approve an immigration overhaul is closing, but House Speaker John A. Boehner continues to suggest that action is still possible -- even as he mocked his colleagues who find the hot-button issue too difficult. "Here's the attitude: Ohhhh. Don't make me do this. Ohhhh. This is too hard," Boehner said, mimicking a whining tone, at an Ohio luncheon, according to the Cincinnati Enquirer.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Jean Merl
Former Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney, taking a broadening role in efforts to help candidates of his party, on Wednesday endorsed former state legislator Tony Strickland, the Strickland campaign announced. The former state assemblyman and state senator is running in the June 3 primary for the Los Angeles-area seat being vacated by Rep. Buck McKeon (R-Santa Clarita), who is retiring when his term expires. McKeon already has endorsed Strickland, one of several Republican candidates in the GOP-leaning 25th Congressional District.
NATIONAL
April 21, 2014 | By Richard Simon
Thousands of bills are introduced in a congressional session, but only a fraction become law. Even without that success, they call attention to their causes - or their sponsors. Here are a few of the eclectic measures awaiting action in Congress. Apollo Lunar Landing Legacy Act: Would establish the Apollo Lunar Landing Sites National Historical Park on the moon. Argument for: "In 1969, led by the late Apollo astronaut Neil Armstrong, American ingenuity changed history as humanity took a giant leap forward on the surface of the moon," said Rep. Donna Edwards (D-Md.)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | Jean Merl
On the same day a new poll showed Americans still don't think much of Congress, several California candidates tried to show their solidarity with people on taxes. Some, including Republican congressional candidates Doug Ose, Tony Strickland and Paul Chabot, took Tuesday's state and federal income tax filing deadline to criticize government spending. "Tax Day is a stark reminder of just how much the government is over-taxing our country," Strickland said in a statement released by his campaign, while Ose and Chabot signed the "Tax Protection Pledge" to oppose all tax increases.
NEWS
April 12, 2014 | By Don Lee
WASHINGTON - The U.S. made clear this week that it wants the International Monetary Fund to be the emergency lender for countries like Ukraine, but American lawmakers have persistently refused to give the IMF the additional financial firepower that it has sought. That tension was evident in meetings concluding this weekend of the IMF, the World Bank and representatives of the Group of 20 major economies: Washington's long delay in ratifying changes to the IMF's so-called quota system came under fire from finance ministers and other officials of many countries.
WORLD
April 11, 2014 | By Paul Richter and Ramin Mostaghim
WASHINGTON - The White House will block Iran's choice of United Nations ambassador from entering the United States, officials said Friday, stoking new tension between Tehran and Washington as they approach a critical moment in negotiations over Iran's disputed nuclear program. Facing overwhelming bipartisan pressure from Congress, White House officials said Hamid Aboutalebi would not be granted a U.S. visa. The choice of the veteran diplomat set off an outcry in Washington because of his membership in the radical student group that stormed the U.S. Embassy in Tehran and held U.S. diplomats hostage during Iran's 1979 revolution.
OPINION
April 10, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
How's this for irony: Having allowed federal unemployment benefits to run out in December, some lawmakers are balking at a bill to renew them retroactively because it might be hard to figure out who should receive them. Congress made this task far harder than it should have been, but the technical challenges aren't insurmountable. Lawmakers should restore the benefits now and leave them in place until the unemployment rate reaches a more reasonable level. Federal jobless benefits, which are provided only in times of high unemployment, kick in after people have exhausted their state benefits, which typically last for six months.
NEWS
April 9, 2014 | By Brian Bennett and Lisa Mascaro, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details.
WASHINGTON - After meeting with Homeland Security Secretary Jeh Johnson, leaders of the Congressional Hispanic Caucus voiced confidence Wednesday that if the Republican-led House fails to undertake immigration reform this year, the administration will act by executive action. Last month, President Obama promised Latino leaders that his administration would review its deportation policy and enforce laws "more humanely. " Under Obama, deportations hit the 2-million mark, often separating families.
OPINION
April 8, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
No one should have expected that putting more vegetables in front of elementary school students would instantly turn them into an army of broccoli fans. Plenty of food has been thrown out since new federal rules took effect in 2011 requiring students in the subsidized school lunch program to choose a fruit or vegetable each day. Nevertheless, studies find that continued exposure to produce is resulting in more children eating at least some of it. That's worth a certain amount of wasted food.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - Adam Crain assumed that tapping into the computer networks used by power companies to keep electricity zipping through transmission lines would be nearly impossible in these days of heightened vigilance over cybersecurity. When he discovered how wrong he was, his work sent Homeland Security Department officials into a scramble. Crain, the owner of a small tech firm in Raleigh, N.C., along with a research partner, found penetrating transmission systems used by dozens of utilities to be startlingly easy.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|