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NEWS
May 18, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sonia Gandhi, the enigmatic heir to India's grandest political dynasty, quit Monday as the leader of the Congress Party amid a controversy over her Italian birth. Gandhi, the widow of former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi, tendered her resignation even as the Congress Party was preparing to offer her as its candidate for prime minister in elections later this year.
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NEWS
May 25, 1999 | Associated Press
Ending a leadership crisis for India's main opposition party, Sonia Gandhi announced Monday that she will remain at the helm of the Congress Party. "She has reconsidered her decision [to resign] and agreed to continue as Congress president," senior party leader Pranab Mukherjee told reporters.
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NEWS
April 24, 1999 | Reuters
India's Congress party, thwarted in its bid to form a minority government, sought more time Friday to win key support from a clutch of regional and communist parties. Four parties from a patchwork of regional, caste-based and leftist groups on which Sonia Gandhi's Congress was relying, would not declare their support. Gandhi said after meeting President K.R.
NEWS
May 18, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Sonia Gandhi, the enigmatic heir to India's grandest political dynasty, quit Monday as the leader of the Congress Party amid a controversy over her Italian birth. Gandhi, the widow of former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi, tendered her resignation even as the Congress Party was preparing to offer her as its candidate for prime minister in elections later this year.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | From Associated Press
Prime Minister Chandra Shekhar resigned in anger Wednesday, accusing former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi and his political party of betrayal and making new elections a virtual certainty. Shekhar, a veteran politician but a novice in the top circles of government, served three months as head of a minority government in India, the world's largest democracy.
NEWS
May 25, 1999 | Associated Press
Ending a leadership crisis for India's main opposition party, Sonia Gandhi announced Monday that she will remain at the helm of the Congress Party. "She has reconsidered her decision [to resign] and agreed to continue as Congress president," senior party leader Pranab Mukherjee told reporters.
NEWS
May 25, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time when politics in India was the Congress, and the Congress was politics. The Indian National Congress party was the locomotive powering the independence struggle, political instrument of luminaries such as Mohandas K. Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru. The party ultimately marshaled one of the world's most diverse populations--landlords and poor peasants, Hindus and Muslims, Brahmins and untouchables--and mitigated and reconciled their demands.
NEWS
April 12, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening the door for possible new elections in India's increasingly fragmented democracy, Parliament on Friday roundly rejected Prime Minister H.D. Deve Gowda, a peasant farmer who served only 10 months at the head of a fragile coalition government. India's long-ruling Congress (I) Party withdrew its support from the center-left government, and Gowda lost a vote of confidence by a lopsided margin before India's lower house of Parliament, the Lok Sabha.
WORLD
May 14, 2004 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Sonia Gandhi, the woman who Thursday staged one of India's memorable electoral comebacks, is a reluctant politician with a distaste for the rough and tumble of politics. Gandhi is said to have threatened to divorce her husband, Rajiv, after he decided to enter politics to succeed his assassinated mother and former prime minister, Indira Gandhi. After Rajiv's assassination in 1991, Sonia Gandhi became a virtual recluse. She avoided Indian politics and tried to shield her two children from it.
WORLD
January 13, 2004 | Shankhadeep Choudhury, Times Staff Writer
Hoping to benefit from an economic boom and an improving image abroad, India's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party decided Monday to seek early elections. The BJP's national executive ended a two-day meeting with a unanimous resolution calling for the move. Indian Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee, 79, signaled that the voting could take place by April.
NEWS
April 24, 1999 | Reuters
India's Congress party, thwarted in its bid to form a minority government, sought more time Friday to win key support from a clutch of regional and communist parties. Four parties from a patchwork of regional, caste-based and leftist groups on which Sonia Gandhi's Congress was relying, would not declare their support. Gandhi said after meeting President K.R.
NEWS
April 12, 1997 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Opening the door for possible new elections in India's increasingly fragmented democracy, Parliament on Friday roundly rejected Prime Minister H.D. Deve Gowda, a peasant farmer who served only 10 months at the head of a fragile coalition government. India's long-ruling Congress (I) Party withdrew its support from the center-left government, and Gowda lost a vote of confidence by a lopsided margin before India's lower house of Parliament, the Lok Sabha.
NEWS
May 25, 1996 | JOHN-THOR DAHLBURG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There was a time when politics in India was the Congress, and the Congress was politics. The Indian National Congress party was the locomotive powering the independence struggle, political instrument of luminaries such as Mohandas K. Gandhi and Jawaharlal Nehru. The party ultimately marshaled one of the world's most diverse populations--landlords and poor peasants, Hindus and Muslims, Brahmins and untouchables--and mitigated and reconciled their demands.
NEWS
March 7, 1991 | From Associated Press
Prime Minister Chandra Shekhar resigned in anger Wednesday, accusing former Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi and his political party of betrayal and making new elections a virtual certainty. Shekhar, a veteran politician but a novice in the top circles of government, served three months as head of a minority government in India, the world's largest democracy.
WORLD
June 2, 2004 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Amid signs of strain in their uneasy peace, India and Pakistan agreed Tuesday to begin new negotiations at the end of this month. The first round of peace talks between the countries' foreign secretaries, the top civil servants under the foreign ministers, are set for June 27-28, new Indian Foreign Minister Natwar Singh announced.
NEWS
October 8, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hindu nationalists rode to victory Thursday in countrywide elections, leading a far-flung collection of parties with a promise to end the instability that has dogged Indian politics in recent years. Prime Minister Atal Behari Vajpayee and his 22-party coalition captured a comfortable majority in Parliament, possibly enough to give his new government a chance to serve out its full five-year term--something the past four governments were unable to do.
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