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NEWS
February 5, 1992 | JAMES RISEN and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan said Tuesday that he believes the economy is poised for recovery beginning in the spring, but he assured Congress that the Fed stands ready to cut interest rates further if that is necessary to provide "additional insurance" against a lingering recession.
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WORLD
March 4, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration's plans to impose punitive economic sanctions on Russia - potentially its strongest response to Moscow's military intervention in Ukraine - already are facing resistance from administration allies in Congress and Europe. Although administration officials say they are prepared to freeze assets of top Russian officials and possibly target state-run financial institutions, European allies - who are heavily dependent on Russian oil and gas supplies - signaled they aren't ready to follow suit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1997 | From Religion News Service
The 105th Congress, now getting down to business, may not look like America in terms of class, race or gender. But when it comes to religion, members are fairly representative of the nation, according to a new survey of congressional religious affiliations.
WORLD
July 28, 2011 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Senior State Department officials came under tough questioning from lawmakers Wednesday over the Obama administration's reluctance to call for Syrian President Bashar Assad's departure. Despite the Assad government's bloody crackdown on demonstrators, U.S. officials have shied away from calling directly for his ouster. They worry that the United States would end up looking weak if Assad managed to hang on in the face of popular pressure. And with American leverage limited in Syria, they also have been reluctant to raise expectations about what the administration might be prepared to do to unseat the regime.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accepting the argument by Secretary of State Warren Christopher that the issue is now "an acid test of American leadership" in the world, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) and other congressional Republicans on Thursday reluctantly endorsed President Clinton's planned deployment of 20,000 troops to enforce the peace agreement in Bosnia. Although he does not agree with Clinton, Dole told the Senate that "we have one President at a time. He's the commander in chief. He made the decision."
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | SARA FRITZ and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Democratic-controlled Congress, closing ranks behind President Bush at a crucial moment in American history, voted Saturday to authorize U.S. troops to attack Iraq as early as Wednesday. Bush's victory was decisive and bipartisan, even though the authorization was strongly opposed by the Democratic leadership and most aspirants for the Democratic presidential nomination. Many Democrats abandoned their party leaders, and Republicans were nearly unanimous in support of the President.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James E. Rogan has wedged his 6-foot-1 frame into a phone booth between the men's room and a kitchenette in a House office building. The air stinks of stale cigar smoke and there's no place to sit. But who cares? His 20 minutes in this cramped closet will be rewarded handsomely. On the other end of the line is radio talk show host G. Gordon Liddy, broadcasting live to a syndicated audience of hard-right Clinton haters.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | GREGG ZOROYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Congressman Gary A. Franks remembers taking a road trip through Ithaca, N.Y., with the Yale basket ball team. He and teammate Leroy Watkins stopped at a diner there, found seats and waited. Four white players walked in and were served. But it wasn't until Franks upended a salt shaker, spilling its contents on the floor, that the waitress rushed over. Franks--then a bushy-haired, bushy-bearded sociology student and starting guard--told her, "Now, we're ready to place our order."
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | SUE ELLEN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Speaking softly in a voice that often broke, an American-born woman who fled Kuwait after the Aug. 2 Iraqi invasion told members of Congress about the scene at a hospital there: "We took our cousin, who was in labor, to Sabah Maternity Hospital. Upon our arrival, we saw a Kuwaiti woman at the front door--in hysterics, because she was in labor and they (Iraqi troops) would not allow her to enter," said Deborah Hadi, pausing to fight back a sob.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Amid cries of "fascism" and "McCarthyism," a bitter fight has erupted between conservative Republican leaders in Congress and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce that reflects the deepening split within the GOP and the shadow it casts over the party's future. U.S. business, represented in Washington by the Chamber and similar organizations, has long been a mainstay of the Republican Party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2010 | By Johanna Neuman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Robert Carlyle Byrd, the West Virginia Democrat who was often called the conscience of the Senate for his devotion to the system of constitutional checks and balances and the prerogatives of power, died early Monday. He was 92. Byrd, who served longer and cast more congressional votes than any other member of Congress in U.S. history since taking office in January 1959, died at Inova Hospital in Fairfax, Va., a family spokesman said. He was admitted to the hospital late last week with what was believed to be heat exhaustion and severe dehydration as a result of the high temperatures in the capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2010 | By Johanna Neuman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Robert Carlyle Byrd, the West Virginia Democrat who was often called the conscience of the Senate for his devotion to the system of constitutional checks and balances and the prerogatives of power, died early Monday. He was 92. Byrd, who served longer and cast more congressional votes than any other member of Congress in U.S. history since taking office in January 1959, died at Inova Hospital in Fairfax, Va., a family spokesman said. He was admitted to the hospital late last week with what was believed to be heat exhaustion and severe dehydration as a result of the high temperatures in the capital.
NATIONAL
April 29, 2009 | Janet Hook and James Oliphant
Sen. Arlen Specter's decision to switch parties Tuesday further erodes the GOP's legislative power and adds a key player to the Democrats' quest for a filibuster-proof majority to propel President Obama's ambitious agenda.
NATIONAL
March 3, 2009 | Peter Nicholas
The Obama White House has begun advancing an aggressive political strategy: persuading the country that real power behind the Republican Party is not the GOP leaders in Congress or at the Republican National Committee, but rather provocative radio talk show king Rush Limbaugh. President Obama himself, along with top aides and outside Democratic allies, have been pushing the message in unison.
NATIONAL
February 17, 2009 | Noam N. Levey
John Peeler, an unemployed computer technician in South Carolina, may soon get health insurance for his wife and three children. Four months after being laid off, he is one of the lucky jobless Americans who could receive thousands of dollars in government subsidies from the new stimulus plan. Susan McKowen, a 62-year-old breast cancer survivor from Illinois, is not so fortunate.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2008 | Janet Hook, Hook is a writer in our Washington bureau.
The collapse of legislation to bail out the U.S. auto industry is a fitting end to this year in Congress -- and a warning to President-elect Barack Obama that even larger Democratic majorities next year won't guarantee smooth sailing for his ambitious agenda on economics and other issues. Polarized, beset by crises, and preoccupied with ideological and regional politics, this Congress followed a pattern all too familiar in the past decade.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON
The two dozen Republicans who represent California in Congress usually give far closer scrutiny to Democratic plots on Capitol Hill than those in the state Capitol. With good reason: Republicans here have their hands full managing a precarious majority in the House of Representatives and a somewhat firmer majority in the Senate against the maneuvers of a wily Democratic president.
BUSINESS
November 24, 2008 | Mike Dorning, Dorning is a writer in our Washington bureau.
A senior advisor to President-elect Barack Obama warned Sunday that American automakers would have to come up with a plan to restructure before the industry received any federal bailout. "They're going to have to retool and rationalize their industry for the future. And if they don't do that, then there's very little that taxpayers can do to help them," incoming White House senior advisor David Axelrod said on ABC News' "This Week."
BUSINESS
November 21, 2008 | Richard Simon and Jim Puzzanghera, Simon and Puzzanghera are writers in our Washington bureau.
Congressional leaders agreed Thursday to give Detroit automakers more time to make their case for a $25-billion emergency bailout, but they demanded that General Motors Corp., Ford Motor Co. and Chrysler provide detailed plans for using the money to assure their long-term viability without more handouts. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-San Francisco) and Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-Nev.) agreed to call Congress back into session next month to revisit the bailout issue.
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