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NEWS
February 5, 1992 | JAMES RISEN and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan said Tuesday that he believes the economy is poised for recovery beginning in the spring, but he assured Congress that the Fed stands ready to cut interest rates further if that is necessary to provide "additional insurance" against a lingering recession.
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WORLD
March 4, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration's plans to impose punitive economic sanctions on Russia - potentially its strongest response to Moscow's military intervention in Ukraine - already are facing resistance from administration allies in Congress and Europe. Although administration officials say they are prepared to freeze assets of top Russian officials and possibly target state-run financial institutions, European allies - who are heavily dependent on Russian oil and gas supplies - signaled they aren't ready to follow suit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1997 | From Religion News Service
The 105th Congress, now getting down to business, may not look like America in terms of class, race or gender. But when it comes to religion, members are fairly representative of the nation, according to a new survey of congressional religious affiliations.
WORLD
July 28, 2011 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Senior State Department officials came under tough questioning from lawmakers Wednesday over the Obama administration's reluctance to call for Syrian President Bashar Assad's departure. Despite the Assad government's bloody crackdown on demonstrators, U.S. officials have shied away from calling directly for his ouster. They worry that the United States would end up looking weak if Assad managed to hang on in the face of popular pressure. And with American leverage limited in Syria, they also have been reluctant to raise expectations about what the administration might be prepared to do to unseat the regime.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accepting the argument by Secretary of State Warren Christopher that the issue is now "an acid test of American leadership" in the world, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) and other congressional Republicans on Thursday reluctantly endorsed President Clinton's planned deployment of 20,000 troops to enforce the peace agreement in Bosnia. Although he does not agree with Clinton, Dole told the Senate that "we have one President at a time. He's the commander in chief. He made the decision."
NEWS
April 22, 1994 | MICHAEL ROSS and JOHN BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Momentum built quickly in Congress on Thursday for lifting the arms embargo on Bosnia-Herzegovina, with many lawmakers calling on President Clinton to break with the United Nations and take unilateral steps to arm the embattled forces of the Bosnian government. During an impassioned daylong debate in the Senate, major divisions emerged between lawmakers who want Clinton to lift the U.N.
NATIONAL
November 13, 2006 | Chuck Neubauer and Tom Hamburger, Times Staff Writers
Incoming Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid vows to make reform of congressional earmarks a priority of his tenure, arguing that members need to be more transparent when they load pet projects for their districts into federal spending bills. But last year's huge $286-billion federal transportation bill included a little-noticed slice of pork pushed by Reid that provided benefits not only for the casino town of Laughlin, Nev., but also, possibly, for the senator himself.
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | SARA FRITZ and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Democratic-controlled Congress, closing ranks behind President Bush at a crucial moment in American history, voted Saturday to authorize U.S. troops to attack Iraq as early as Wednesday. Bush's victory was decisive and bipartisan, even though the authorization was strongly opposed by the Democratic leadership and most aspirants for the Democratic presidential nomination. Many Democrats abandoned their party leaders, and Republicans were nearly unanimous in support of the President.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James E. Rogan has wedged his 6-foot-1 frame into a phone booth between the men's room and a kitchenette in a House office building. The air stinks of stale cigar smoke and there's no place to sit. But who cares? His 20 minutes in this cramped closet will be rewarded handsomely. On the other end of the line is radio talk show host G. Gordon Liddy, broadcasting live to a syndicated audience of hard-right Clinton haters.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | GREGG ZOROYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Congressman Gary A. Franks remembers taking a road trip through Ithaca, N.Y., with the Yale basket ball team. He and teammate Leroy Watkins stopped at a diner there, found seats and waited. Four white players walked in and were served. But it wasn't until Franks upended a salt shaker, spilling its contents on the floor, that the waitress rushed over. Franks--then a bushy-haired, bushy-bearded sociology student and starting guard--told her, "Now, we're ready to place our order."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2010 | By Johanna Neuman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Robert Carlyle Byrd, the West Virginia Democrat who was often called the conscience of the Senate for his devotion to the system of constitutional checks and balances and the prerogatives of power, died early Monday. He was 92. Byrd, who served longer and cast more congressional votes than any other member of Congress in U.S. history since taking office in January 1959, died at Inova Hospital in Fairfax, Va., a family spokesman said. He was admitted to the hospital late last week with what was believed to be heat exhaustion and severe dehydration as a result of the high temperatures in the capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2010 | By Johanna Neuman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Robert Carlyle Byrd, the West Virginia Democrat who was often called the conscience of the Senate for his devotion to the system of constitutional checks and balances and the prerogatives of power, died early Monday. He was 92. Byrd, who served longer and cast more congressional votes than any other member of Congress in U.S. history since taking office in January 1959, died at Inova Hospital in Fairfax, Va., a family spokesman said. He was admitted to the hospital late last week with what was believed to be heat exhaustion and severe dehydration as a result of the high temperatures in the capital.
NATIONAL
November 4, 2009 | Alexander C. Hart
German Chancellor Angela Merkel on Tuesday urged Congress to take dramatic action to stop climate change, but the political difficulties were evident as Republicans boycotted a Senate committee meeting on a global warming bill. "We cannot afford missing the objectives in climate protection," Merkel said at a joint session of Congress. "The world will look to us, to the Europeans and to the Americans." Just before Merkel's speech, Republicans shunned the meeting of the Environment and Public Works Committee to protest the refusal of Chairwoman Barbara Boxer (D-Calif.
NATIONAL
October 16, 2009 | James Oliphant
After months of keeping a low profile on healthcare, there was Sen. Joe Lieberman (I-Conn.) on the Don Imus radio show this week, warning that Democrats better not take his vote for granted. Sen. Roland W. Burris, the scandal-plagued freshman Democrat from Illinois, blasted out a news release declaring that he had "emerged as a key player in the healthcare debate." Even Sen. Ben Nelson, the centrist Democrat from Nebraska who has enjoyed months of White House wooing, made a point of reminding a scrum of reporters in the Capitol that he was still uncommitted.
NATIONAL
October 7, 2009 | Associated Press
Lawmakers honored the Dalai Lama with a human rights award Tuesday as President Obama faced criticism for delaying a meeting with the exiled Tibetan Buddhist spiritual leader. The Dalai Lama and the president will not meet until after Obama visits Chinese President Hu Jintao in Beijing in November. China reviles the Dalai Lama as a separatist and pressures foreign governments not to meet with him. The administration, which needs Chinese support for crucial foreign policy, economic and environmental goals, wants to establish friendly ties between Hu and Obama.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2009 | Associated Press
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says that anyone using harsh rhetoric to raise fears about the healthcare overhaul should apologize and get on with writing policy but that there's no reason to single out a Florida Democrat who said Republicans want sick Americans to "die quickly." "If anybody's going to apologize, everybody should apologize," she said when asked Thursday about Rep. Alan Grayson's comments on the House floor this week. Pelosi's response reflects what Democratic aides have said privately since Grayson's remarks sparked an uproar: that Republicans have routinely said with impunity that Democrats want to "pull the plug on Grandma" or create "death panels" to decide who deserves care and who doesn't -- even though no such provisions are in any version of the healthcare legislation.
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | SUE ELLEN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Speaking softly in a voice that often broke, an American-born woman who fled Kuwait after the Aug. 2 Iraqi invasion told members of Congress about the scene at a hospital there: "We took our cousin, who was in labor, to Sabah Maternity Hospital. Upon our arrival, we saw a Kuwaiti woman at the front door--in hysterics, because she was in labor and they (Iraqi troops) would not allow her to enter," said Deborah Hadi, pausing to fight back a sob.
NATIONAL
September 19, 2009 | Joe Markman
President Obama's appointment of "czars," or policy coordinators, is drawing new fire from lawmakers in both parties. They complain that Obama's naming of the czars circumvents the Senate's role in confirming important nominations to the president's administration. In a letter to the president this week, Sen. Susan Collins of Maine and five other Republican lawmakers accused the administration of encroaching on Congress' authority in establishing what they said were too many far-reaching czars.
NATIONAL
September 18, 2009 | James Oliphant
Trying to dodge a growing conservative firestorm, the House and Senate made clear Thursday that the community-based nonprofit organization ACORN was persona non grata on Capitol Hill. House Republicans took over a debate about a sweeping student loan bill to propose a measure that would bar the Assn. of Community Organizers for Reform Now from receiving federal funds. It passed 345 to 75, with 172 Democrats joining all of the chamber's Republicans in support. In the Senate, an amendment that would prohibit ACORN from receiving funding from an Interior Department spending bill passed by an 85-11 vote.
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