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NEWS
February 5, 1992 | JAMES RISEN and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Federal Reserve Board Chairman Alan Greenspan said Tuesday that he believes the economy is poised for recovery beginning in the spring, but he assured Congress that the Fed stands ready to cut interest rates further if that is necessary to provide "additional insurance" against a lingering recession.
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WORLD
March 4, 2014 | By Paul Richter
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration's plans to impose punitive economic sanctions on Russia - potentially its strongest response to Moscow's military intervention in Ukraine - already are facing resistance from administration allies in Congress and Europe. Although administration officials say they are prepared to freeze assets of top Russian officials and possibly target state-run financial institutions, European allies - who are heavily dependent on Russian oil and gas supplies - signaled they aren't ready to follow suit.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1997 | From Religion News Service
The 105th Congress, now getting down to business, may not look like America in terms of class, race or gender. But when it comes to religion, members are fairly representative of the nation, according to a new survey of congressional religious affiliations.
WORLD
July 28, 2011 | By Paul Richter, Los Angeles Times
Senior State Department officials came under tough questioning from lawmakers Wednesday over the Obama administration's reluctance to call for Syrian President Bashar Assad's departure. Despite the Assad government's bloody crackdown on demonstrators, U.S. officials have shied away from calling directly for his ouster. They worry that the United States would end up looking weak if Assad managed to hang on in the face of popular pressure. And with American leverage limited in Syria, they also have been reluctant to raise expectations about what the administration might be prepared to do to unseat the regime.
NEWS
December 1, 1995 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Accepting the argument by Secretary of State Warren Christopher that the issue is now "an acid test of American leadership" in the world, Senate Majority Leader Bob Dole (R-Kan.) and other congressional Republicans on Thursday reluctantly endorsed President Clinton's planned deployment of 20,000 troops to enforce the peace agreement in Bosnia. Although he does not agree with Clinton, Dole told the Senate that "we have one President at a time. He's the commander in chief. He made the decision."
NEWS
January 13, 1991 | SARA FRITZ and WILLIAM J. EATON, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Democratic-controlled Congress, closing ranks behind President Bush at a crucial moment in American history, voted Saturday to authorize U.S. troops to attack Iraq as early as Wednesday. Bush's victory was decisive and bipartisan, even though the authorization was strongly opposed by the Democratic leadership and most aspirants for the Democratic presidential nomination. Many Democrats abandoned their party leaders, and Republicans were nearly unanimous in support of the President.
NEWS
July 29, 1999 | FAYE FIORE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
James E. Rogan has wedged his 6-foot-1 frame into a phone booth between the men's room and a kitchenette in a House office building. The air stinks of stale cigar smoke and there's no place to sit. But who cares? His 20 minutes in this cramped closet will be rewarded handsomely. On the other end of the line is radio talk show host G. Gordon Liddy, broadcasting live to a syndicated audience of hard-right Clinton haters.
NEWS
August 6, 1995 | GREGG ZOROYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Congressman Gary A. Franks remembers taking a road trip through Ithaca, N.Y., with the Yale basket ball team. He and teammate Leroy Watkins stopped at a diner there, found seats and waited. Four white players walked in and were served. But it wasn't until Franks upended a salt shaker, spilling its contents on the floor, that the waitress rushed over. Franks--then a bushy-haired, bushy-bearded sociology student and starting guard--told her, "Now, we're ready to place our order."
NEWS
October 11, 1990 | SUE ELLEN CHRISTIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Speaking softly in a voice that often broke, an American-born woman who fled Kuwait after the Aug. 2 Iraqi invasion told members of Congress about the scene at a hospital there: "We took our cousin, who was in labor, to Sabah Maternity Hospital. Upon our arrival, we saw a Kuwaiti woman at the front door--in hysterics, because she was in labor and they (Iraqi troops) would not allow her to enter," said Deborah Hadi, pausing to fight back a sob.
NEWS
April 9, 1993 | JACK NELSON, TIMES WASHINGTON BUREAU CHIEF
Amid cries of "fascism" and "McCarthyism," a bitter fight has erupted between conservative Republican leaders in Congress and the U.S. Chamber of Commerce that reflects the deepening split within the GOP and the shadow it casts over the party's future. U.S. business, represented in Washington by the Chamber and similar organizations, has long been a mainstay of the Republican Party.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 29, 2010 | By Johanna Neuman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Robert Carlyle Byrd, the West Virginia Democrat who was often called the conscience of the Senate for his devotion to the system of constitutional checks and balances and the prerogatives of power, died early Monday. He was 92. Byrd, who served longer and cast more congressional votes than any other member of Congress in U.S. history since taking office in January 1959, died at Inova Hospital in Fairfax, Va., a family spokesman said. He was admitted to the hospital late last week with what was believed to be heat exhaustion and severe dehydration as a result of the high temperatures in the capital.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 28, 2010 | By Johanna Neuman, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Robert Carlyle Byrd, the West Virginia Democrat who was often called the conscience of the Senate for his devotion to the system of constitutional checks and balances and the prerogatives of power, died early Monday. He was 92. Byrd, who served longer and cast more congressional votes than any other member of Congress in U.S. history since taking office in January 1959, died at Inova Hospital in Fairfax, Va., a family spokesman said. He was admitted to the hospital late last week with what was believed to be heat exhaustion and severe dehydration as a result of the high temperatures in the capital.
NATIONAL
October 2, 2009 | Associated Press
House Speaker Nancy Pelosi says that anyone using harsh rhetoric to raise fears about the healthcare overhaul should apologize and get on with writing policy but that there's no reason to single out a Florida Democrat who said Republicans want sick Americans to "die quickly." "If anybody's going to apologize, everybody should apologize," she said when asked Thursday about Rep. Alan Grayson's comments on the House floor this week. Pelosi's response reflects what Democratic aides have said privately since Grayson's remarks sparked an uproar: that Republicans have routinely said with impunity that Democrats want to "pull the plug on Grandma" or create "death panels" to decide who deserves care and who doesn't -- even though no such provisions are in any version of the healthcare legislation.
NATIONAL
September 10, 2009
Excerpts from President Obama's address to Congress: "I am not the first president to take up this cause, but I am determined to be the last. It has now been nearly a century since Theodore Roosevelt first called for healthcare reform. And ever since, nearly every president and Congress, whether Democrat or Republican, has attempted to meet this challenge in some way. A bill for comprehensive health reform was first introduced by John Dingell Sr. in 1943. Sixty-five years later, his son continues to introduce that same bill at the beginning of each session.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2009 | Peter Nicholas
Amid a summer of setbacks, President Obama's speech tonight before a joint session of Congress is a crucial moment that could determine whether he will be able to reestablish his presidency as what John F. Kennedy called the "vital center of action" in the government. Apart from reviving his healthcare plan, the president needs to reassert his grip on a political apparatus that soon will determine whether his agenda succeeds or fails. The summer left Obama in a weakened position.
NATIONAL
September 9, 2009 | Noam N. Levey and Janet Hook
Senate Finance Committee Chairman Max Baucus (D-Mont.) on Tuesday unveiled his long-awaited compromise blueprint for healthcare reform, proposing new taxes on high-end insurance plans and offering nonprofit insurance cooperatives as an alternative to a controversial government-run option. The unveiling marked an end to his marathon effort to win over substantial Republican support for a healthcare reform plan. Baucus' plan lays down a vision designed to appeal to moderate and conservative Democrats, who will be key to any overhaul.
NEWS
June 8, 1999 | NICK ANDERSON
The two dozen Republicans who represent California in Congress usually give far closer scrutiny to Democratic plots on Capitol Hill than those in the state Capitol. With good reason: Republicans here have their hands full managing a precarious majority in the House of Representatives and a somewhat firmer majority in the Senate against the maneuvers of a wily Democratic president.
NATIONAL
September 3, 2009 | Peter Nicholas and Janet Hook
President Obama's announcement that he will take his case for revamping healthcare before a joint session of Congress next week reflects a decision to go "all in" politically, laying his prestige on the line for the defining domestic issue of his young presidency. Obama is gambling that he can tilt the balance in his favor by spelling out in detail just what he wants from the House and Senate in the coming weeks. Until now, Obama has avoided laying out a blueprint for healthcare, confining himself to statements of broad goals and leaving the particulars to Congress.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2009 | Richard Simon
California has by far the largest delegation in Congress, almost 10% of the membership. Nancy Pelosi, the speaker of the House, is a Californian, as are five of its committees' chairs -- a collection of powerful positions unmatched by any state. The state's two senators chair important committees, and one holds a coveted seat on the Appropriations Committee.
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