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Congressional Elections 2010

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NATIONAL
March 2, 2009 | James Oliphant
In just the last couple of weeks, he clumsily pronounced a Supreme Court justice to be near death and suggested he could sue a fellow senator and the Republican Party. He's raised almost no money for his reelection bid next year and is in serious danger of losing his once-safe seat to the other party. Party insiders are terrified practically every time he opens his mouth, but he seems determined not to go gently into the night.
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NATIONAL
November 3, 2010 | Ashley Powers and P.J. Huffstutter
Democratic Sen. Harry Reid on Tuesday bested Republican upstart Sharron Angle to win the U.S. Senate contest in Nevada, a costly, closely watched brawl that pitted one of President Obama's top lieutenants against a "tea party" favorite. "Today Nevada chose hope over fear. Nevada chose to move forward, not backward," Reid said in a brief speech that ended in an exuberant burst of confetti. Earlier in the evening, several hundred Democrats who had gathered anxiously at the Aria hotel-casino here roared when the Senate majority leader clinched victory.
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NATIONAL
January 8, 2009 | Matea Gold
MSNBC host Chris Matthews put an end to speculation that he was considering a bid for the U.S. Senate, telling his producers Wednesday that he had decided not to jump into the 2010 race in his home state of Pennsylvania. In a routine production meeting before his daily show "Hardball," Matthews informed the staff that he was not going to pursue the seat, network spokesman Jeremy Gaines said. The cable host, who is negotiating a new contract at MSNBC, declined to comment.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2010 | Kim Murphy
U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski's unusual write-in bid to hold on to her Alaska Senate seat appeared to be gaining steam in early returns Tuesday, but analysts warned that the state could be in for a long, close ballot count whose official outcome may remain unknown for weeks. With early ballots and about 58% of the precincts tallied, write-in votes -- most presumably cast for Murkowski -- were leading with 39%. Tea Party Express-backed Republican Joe Miller was trailing with 35%, while Democrat Scott McAdams had 24%. The early lead in write-in ballots suggested Murkowski had a chance of pulling off the first successful write-in campaign for the Senate since 1954.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2010 | By Tom Hamburger and James Oliphant
The Supreme Court's decision Thursday to wipe out most campaign spending limits, coming on top of the Massachusetts Senate race upset, could prove to be a major blow to Democrats and a boost to Republicans in the November midterm elections. The Massachusetts vote -- which ended the Democrats' filibuster-proof 60-vote majority in the Senate -- is already reverberating through business-oriented interest groups and lobbyists. Some are rethinking their willingness to cooperate with President Obama on such contentious issues as healthcare and the environment.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2010 | By James Oliphant
Republican candidates for Congress are latching onto Scott Brown's bolt-from-the-blue win this week in the Massachusetts Senate race, with political outsiders and longtime office-holders alike casting themselves in a similar mold -- or seeing him in their image. Brown was a fairly obscure state senator who shocked the Democratic favorite, Martha Coakley, in the race to replace the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) by employing a tightly focused, populist, anti- Washington message.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2010 | Ashley Powers and P.J. Huffstutter
Democratic Sen. Harry Reid on Tuesday bested Republican upstart Sharron Angle to win the U.S. Senate contest in Nevada, a costly, closely watched brawl that pitted one of President Obama's top lieutenants against a "tea party" favorite. "Today Nevada chose hope over fear. Nevada chose to move forward, not backward," Reid said in a brief speech that ended in an exuberant burst of confetti. Earlier in the evening, several hundred Democrats who had gathered anxiously at the Aria hotel-casino here roared when the Senate majority leader clinched victory.
NATIONAL
August 4, 2009 | Josh Drobnyk
If Sen. Arlen Specter defected from the GOP to avoid a tough primary fight, he failed: The highest-ranking military veteran to serve in Congress will announce today that he is seeking Pennsylvania's Democratic senatorial nomination. Rep. Joe Sestak (D-Pa.), a two-term lawmaker and former Navy vice admiral, will declare his candidacy during a two-day tour around the state, culminating Wednesday with an appearance on Comedy Central's "Colbert Report."
NATIONAL
January 26, 2010 | By Kim Geiger
In another blow to the Democrats, Vice President Joe Biden's son, Beau Biden, announced Monday that he would not seek to fill the U.S. Senate seat vacated by his father. Adding to the party's woes, Democratic Rep. Marion Berry of Arkansas said he would retire, putting his seat up for grabs in an election year that looks increasingly favorable for the GOP. Biden, Delaware's attorney general, had been considered an obvious choice to fill the seat for that state. His announcement came as Democrats reel from last week's special-election loss in Massachusetts for the seat that had been held for decades by the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2010 | By Evan Halper and Shane Goldmacher
The impact of Tuesday's Senate election in Massachusetts hit California within hours, as Republican office- seekers moved to grab opportunities and nervous Democrats scrambled to assess how vulnerable their party's largest stronghold may have become. Until recently, many Democratic strategists believed that incumbent Sen. Barbara Boxer was a prohibitive favorite for reelection in November and that their party's presumed candidate for governor, Atty. Gen. Jerry Brown, would coast to victory.
NATIONAL
March 22, 2010 | By James Oliphant
As the office phones buzzed, party leaders hectored and protesters outside roared, several undecided House Democrats this weekend faced an unpleasant and all-too-realistic prospect: that voting for the healthcare overhaul could doom their careers. Some bit their lips and went ahead, perhaps saying a silent prayer along the way. But others begged off, declining to support the bill for a number of reasons, including its effect on state Medicaid budgets and concerns about its effect on seniors.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2010 | By Jean Merl
As Republicans and Democrats gear up across the country to fight this fall over seats in the House of Representatives, much of the focus in California is on the June 8 primaries. Especially in the two districts with open seats, the races will provide relatively rare change in the state's 53-member delegation. Two veteran representatives are retiring, Democrat Diane Watson of Los Angeles, first elected to Congress in 2001, and Republican George Radanovich of the Central Valley, who initially won the office in 1994.
NATIONAL
February 2, 2010 | By Mark Z. Barabak
Joseph Cao -- the most politically endangered member of Congress, the one and only Republican who voted for President Obama's healthcare plan, a target of Democrats and a source of frustration to many in his own party -- is facing a hometown crowd. "Oftentimes I'm pretty sure that decisions I make might not be the decisions you would make," the lawmaker tells about 125 people lured by free beer and jambalaya to a smoky tavern near downtown. "You might want to scream and bang your head against the wall" or "reach out and strangle me," he continues, but one constant, his one guiding principle, is "a focus on service . . . how I could better serve the people of my district."
NATIONAL
January 26, 2010 | By Kim Geiger
In another blow to the Democrats, Vice President Joe Biden's son, Beau Biden, announced Monday that he would not seek to fill the U.S. Senate seat vacated by his father. Adding to the party's woes, Democratic Rep. Marion Berry of Arkansas said he would retire, putting his seat up for grabs in an election year that looks increasingly favorable for the GOP. Biden, Delaware's attorney general, had been considered an obvious choice to fill the seat for that state. His announcement came as Democrats reel from last week's special-election loss in Massachusetts for the seat that had been held for decades by the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy.
NATIONAL
January 22, 2010 | By James Oliphant
Republican candidates for Congress are latching onto Scott Brown's bolt-from-the-blue win this week in the Massachusetts Senate race, with political outsiders and longtime office-holders alike casting themselves in a similar mold -- or seeing him in their image. Brown was a fairly obscure state senator who shocked the Democratic favorite, Martha Coakley, in the race to replace the late Sen. Edward M. Kennedy (D-Mass.) by employing a tightly focused, populist, anti- Washington message.
NATIONAL
January 21, 2010 | By Tom Hamburger and James Oliphant
The Supreme Court's decision Thursday to wipe out most campaign spending limits, coming on top of the Massachusetts Senate race upset, could prove to be a major blow to Democrats and a boost to Republicans in the November midterm elections. The Massachusetts vote -- which ended the Democrats' filibuster-proof 60-vote majority in the Senate -- is already reverberating through business-oriented interest groups and lobbyists. Some are rethinking their willingness to cooperate with President Obama on such contentious issues as healthcare and the environment.
NATIONAL
January 5, 2010 | By Peter Nicholas
A commotion unfolds in the tiny public library here as the staff searches for a copy of the memoir written by Harry Reid, Senate Democratic leader and Searchlight native. "Has anyone seen Harry's book?" a librarian calls out. A local patron grabs a trash can and peers inside: "It's not where it's supposed to be," he says. In his hometown at least, there seems to be little affection for Reid, whom some residents describe as a distant figure out of touch with local concerns.
NATIONAL
November 3, 2010 | Kim Murphy
U.S. Sen. Lisa Murkowski's unusual write-in bid to hold on to her Alaska Senate seat appeared to be gaining steam in early returns Tuesday, but analysts warned that the state could be in for a long, close ballot count whose official outcome may remain unknown for weeks. With early ballots and about 58% of the precincts tallied, write-in votes -- most presumably cast for Murkowski -- were leading with 39%. Tea Party Express-backed Republican Joe Miller was trailing with 35%, while Democrat Scott McAdams had 24%. The early lead in write-in ballots suggested Murkowski had a chance of pulling off the first successful write-in campaign for the Senate since 1954.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 21, 2010 | By Evan Halper and Shane Goldmacher
The impact of Tuesday's Senate election in Massachusetts hit California within hours, as Republican office- seekers moved to grab opportunities and nervous Democrats scrambled to assess how vulnerable their party's largest stronghold may have become. Until recently, many Democratic strategists believed that incumbent Sen. Barbara Boxer was a prohibitive favorite for reelection in November and that their party's presumed candidate for governor, Atty. Gen. Jerry Brown, would coast to victory.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2010 | By Janet Hook
The decisions by two powerful Democrats to retire from the Senate are a rude reminder of how dramatically the political climate has changed over the last 12 months since President Obama came to power -- a wind shift that has thrown the Democratic Party off balance and turned the politics of raising hope into the politics of managing anger. The news that Sens. Byron L. Dorgan (D-N.D.) and Christopher J. Dodd (D-Conn.) would not seek reelection in 2010, compounded by Wednesday's surprise announcement that the Democratic governor of Colorado would not seek another term, resulted from very different personal and political considerations.
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