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NEWS
September 7, 1989
Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) blamed President Bush for the slow pace at which he is filling top-level posts in the Administration, charging that no nominations have been made for nearly half the positions. Mitchell said that, according to the Congressional Research Service, there are 432 full-time positions in executive departments and independent agencies that require Senate confirmation. That list does not include ambassadors, U.S. marshals or U.S. attorneys.
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NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Evan Halper and Richard Simon, This post has been updated. See note below for details.
WASHINGTON -- About 400,000 civilian workers for the Department of Defense would be furloughed starting Tuesday if Congress is unable to reach a deal to fund the federal government, according to the Pentagon's top finance official. Military service members would continue to report to duty, but they, too, would not be paid during a shutdown. The first paychecks that would potentially not be issued would be the ones due Oct. 15, according to Undersecretary of Defense Robert F. Hale. In a shutdown, the department would also be forced to stop other payments, including death benefits for families of members of the armed services.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1999
In 1994, then House Speaker Newt Gingrich promised to post all congressional proceedings on the Internet as a way of launching what he called a "civilizational upheaval" in which "regular people in little towns"--not well-moneyed lobbyists--would manage affairs in Washington.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2013 | By Evan Halper and Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon would furlough 400,000 civilian workers and temporarily stop paying death benefits to military families. The National Park Service would close all 401 national parks and give overnight campers two days to leave. Calls to the IRS would go unanswered. Those are among the effects that the public probably will notice first if federal agencies start shutting down Tuesday because Congress has failed to pass a bill to provide money for the new fiscal year. Agencies began disclosing their contingency plans Friday, and the announcements immediately became part of the partisan back-and-forth over whether the government will shut down and who is to blame.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2006 | Siobhan Gorman, Baltimore Sun
A report to Congress released Friday concluded that the Bush administration's defense of the National Security Agency's domestic spying program was not as "well-grounded" in the law as the White House claimed. The report by the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service is the most comprehensive analysis yet of legal arguments for President Bush's authorization of warrantless eavesdropping in the U.S.
NATIONAL
September 27, 2013 | By Evan Halper and Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - The Pentagon would furlough 400,000 civilian workers and temporarily stop paying death benefits to military families. The National Park Service would close all 401 national parks and give overnight campers two days to leave. Calls to the IRS would go unanswered. Those are among the effects that the public probably will notice first if federal agencies start shutting down Tuesday because Congress has failed to pass a bill to provide money for the new fiscal year. Agencies began disclosing their contingency plans Friday, and the announcements immediately became part of the partisan back-and-forth over whether the government will shut down and who is to blame.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | SARAH BOOTH CONROY, The Washington Post
Everyone in Washington knows about ghost writers, political managers, erudite wives and lobbyists who put words in the mouths of members of Congress. Few know of the solons' secret source of wise words--the Congressional Research Service. CRS is the Library of Congress arm--or rather eye--that looks things up for Congress, to put it simply.
NEWS
September 27, 2013 | By Evan Halper and Richard Simon, This post has been updated. See note below for details.
WASHINGTON -- About 400,000 civilian workers for the Department of Defense would be furloughed starting Tuesday if Congress is unable to reach a deal to fund the federal government, according to the Pentagon's top finance official. Military service members would continue to report to duty, but they, too, would not be paid during a shutdown. The first paychecks that would potentially not be issued would be the ones due Oct. 15, according to Undersecretary of Defense Robert F. Hale. In a shutdown, the department would also be forced to stop other payments, including death benefits for families of members of the armed services.
NATIONAL
March 4, 2014 | By Evan Halper
WASHINGTON - As international efforts to reduce greenhouse gas emissions stall, schemes to slow global warming using fantastical technologies once dismissed as a sideshow are getting serious consideration in Washington. Ships that spew salt into the air to block sunlight. Mirrored satellites designed to bounce solar rays back into space. Massive "reverse" power plants that would suck carbon from the atmosphere. These are among the ideas the National Academy of Sciences has charged a panel of some of the nation's top climate thinkers to investigate.
BUSINESS
October 19, 2001 | Bloomberg News
General Dynamics Corp. beat out rival Northrop Grumman Corp. for contracts to build the U.S. Navy's next generation of supply ships--a 12-vessel program worth as much as $3.7 billion, the Navy said. General Dynamics' National Steel and Shipbuilding Co. in San Diego bested L.A.-based Northrop Grumman's Avondale Industries, based outside New Orleans.
NATIONAL
January 7, 2006 | Siobhan Gorman, Baltimore Sun
A report to Congress released Friday concluded that the Bush administration's defense of the National Security Agency's domestic spying program was not as "well-grounded" in the law as the White House claimed. The report by the nonpartisan Congressional Research Service is the most comprehensive analysis yet of legal arguments for President Bush's authorization of warrantless eavesdropping in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 4, 1999
In 1994, then House Speaker Newt Gingrich promised to post all congressional proceedings on the Internet as a way of launching what he called a "civilizational upheaval" in which "regular people in little towns"--not well-moneyed lobbyists--would manage affairs in Washington.
NEWS
September 7, 1989
Senate Majority Leader George J. Mitchell (D-Me.) blamed President Bush for the slow pace at which he is filling top-level posts in the Administration, charging that no nominations have been made for nearly half the positions. Mitchell said that, according to the Congressional Research Service, there are 432 full-time positions in executive departments and independent agencies that require Senate confirmation. That list does not include ambassadors, U.S. marshals or U.S. attorneys.
NEWS
September 3, 1989 | SARAH BOOTH CONROY, The Washington Post
Everyone in Washington knows about ghost writers, political managers, erudite wives and lobbyists who put words in the mouths of members of Congress. Few know of the solons' secret source of wise words--the Congressional Research Service. CRS is the Library of Congress arm--or rather eye--that looks things up for Congress, to put it simply.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 28, 1988 | JOHN VOLAND, Arts and entertainment reports from The Times, national and international news services and the nation's press
Minority-owned broadcast stations are providing more programming of interest to minorities than non-minority-owned stations. That was the conclusion of a report by the Congressional Research Service, which also found that stations owned by women played best to female audiences. Rep. Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.
NEWS
August 1, 1989
American arms sales to the Third World in 1988 rose by 66% from the year before while Soviet sales fell by 47% during the same period, the Congressional Research Service said, according to the New York Times. The newspaper said U.S. sales to the Third World previously had lagged far behind the those of the Soviet Union. U. S. sales in 1988 reached $9.2 billion compared to $9.9 billion for Moscow. U.S. and Soviet sales account for nearly two-thirds of all arms sales to developing countries.
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