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August 15, 1991 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A report on a major study estimates that the HIV infection rate in New Haven, Conn., fell by a third in just eight months after sterile hypodermic syringes were distributed to drug users. The findings are further stirring the heated nationwide debate over officially sanctioned needle exchanges. In New York City, which has more than 33,000 AIDS cases, health officials are reconsidering a ban on giving clean needles to addicts.
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NEWS
October 30, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hundreds of residents who received flu shots at clinics in Monroe, Conn., are worried that they might have been exposed to viruses that cause hepatitis and AIDS, health officials said. They said many residents lined up for recommended hepatitis B shots after the scare. The shots are being given as a precaution because the town's health director, who has since resigned, did not change the syringe between flu shots that he gave to about 468 people.
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NEWS
June 7, 1994 | From Associated Press
A third case of bacteria that can eat away muscle and flesh was reported Monday and doctors tried to reassure the public that the strain does not affect most people. "As far as we're concerned, it's not a public health problem . . . . We're talking about a very rare disease," said Dr. James Hadler, chief epidemiologist for the state Health Department. A man and a woman, both in their 30s, were admitted separately to Norwalk Hospital last month with virulent forms of the streptococcus bacterium.
NEWS
June 7, 1994 | From Associated Press
A third case of bacteria that can eat away muscle and flesh was reported Monday and doctors tried to reassure the public that the strain does not affect most people. "As far as we're concerned, it's not a public health problem . . . . We're talking about a very rare disease," said Dr. James Hadler, chief epidemiologist for the state Health Department. A man and a woman, both in their 30s, were admitted separately to Norwalk Hospital last month with virulent forms of the streptococcus bacterium.
NEWS
October 30, 1997 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Hundreds of residents who received flu shots at clinics in Monroe, Conn., are worried that they might have been exposed to viruses that cause hepatitis and AIDS, health officials said. They said many residents lined up for recommended hepatitis B shots after the scare. The shots are being given as a precaution because the town's health director, who has since resigned, did not change the syringe between flu shots that he gave to about 468 people.
HEALTH
October 7, 2002 | WILLIAM HATHAWAY, HARTFORD COURANT
A growing number of doctors are now convinced that for many people, too much iron in the blood is a bigger health problem than too little. "For years we were getting, 'Rah, rah, the more iron the better.' Now that has changed around completely," said Richard Stevens, a cancer epidemiologist at University of Connecticut Health Center who has studied the potential health risks of elevated levels of iron.
BUSINESS
April 20, 1993 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Cigna Sues NME, Claims Fraud: Cigna Corp. said it has sued National Medical Enterprises Inc., alleging that the psychiatric hospital operator committed widespread insurance fraud against the Connecticut health insurer. The suit, filed in U.S. District Court in Dallas on March 24, seeks repayment of millions of dollars of patient treatment charges that it alleges were billed fraudulently. Equitable Life Assurance Society of the United States, based in New York, is also a plaintiff in the suit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 10, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
An experimental contraceptive vaccine has blocked fertility without fail in female and male guinea pigs, researchers report, raising prospects that a similar approach might work for women and men. The vaccine is designed to prevent fertilization, which may make it more widely acceptable than another vaccine already being tested in humans that stops development of the embryo, other scientists said.
NEWS
August 4, 1994
After more than a century of girding the loins of American male athletes--and giving its name to those who wear it--the jock is slipping. Although the jock alone may be an endangered species, it's still issued by many college and pro teams. And protective cups, both hard and soft--with cup supporters that, with any luck, keep them in position--have never gone out of style in contact sports. But novel fabrics and designs have helped to create a new generation of athletic underwear.
NEWS
August 23, 1995 | From Associated Press
A new study of hundreds of men with prostate cancer supports the idea that those over age 65 with slow-growing tumors may live as long without treatment as with it. It is the first such study solely among American men, and its findings parallel previous U.S. and international data, researchers said in today's issue of the Journal of the American Medical Assn. Prostate cancer is the second leading cancer killer of men, after lung cancer.
NEWS
August 15, 1991 | JOHN J. GOLDMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A report on a major study estimates that the HIV infection rate in New Haven, Conn., fell by a third in just eight months after sterile hypodermic syringes were distributed to drug users. The findings are further stirring the heated nationwide debate over officially sanctioned needle exchanges. In New York City, which has more than 33,000 AIDS cases, health officials are reconsidering a ban on giving clean needles to addicts.
HEALTH
December 25, 2000 | From Hartford Courant
What goes through the minds of Alzheimer's patients is largely a mystery. "Very few researchers investigate Alzheimer's from the perspective of the person with dementia," says Dr. Sandra Bellantonio, a geriatrics specialist at the University of Connecticut Health Center who has applied for funding to study Alzheimer's from the perspective of the stricken. "The consensus has been they are not able to experience the world or communicate with others. I don't think that is true at all."
NEWS
April 13, 2011 | By Eryn Brown, Los Angeles Times
A representative for Catherine Zeta-Jones confirmed Wednesday that the actress recently underwent inpatient treatment for bipolar II disorder at a Connecticut mental health facility.  Booster Shots spoke about the disorder with David J. Miklowitz, PhD, a professor of psychiatry at the UCLA School of Medicine and author of "The Bipolar Disorder Survival Guide: What You and Your Family Need to Know. " Bipolar disorder, formerly known as manic-depression, is typically lifelong and recurrent, Miklowitz said.  Some people have their first episode in childhood, others later in life; the majority, during the teen years.  Some people experience episodes every few years; others are in and out of episodes constantly.
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