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Connie Chung

ENTERTAINMENT
July 31, 1990 | IRV LETOFSKY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the more unusual developments in network television, newswoman Connie Chung declared Monday that she is postponing her new CBS magazine series while she and her husband, TV journalist Maury Povich, try to have a child. The program, "Face to Face with Connie Chung"--a retooling from her Saturday night show of last season--was scheduled to begin a regular run in September at 10 p.m. on Mondays.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 30, 1990 | From Associated Press
Connie Chung wants to have a baby before it's too late, so today she removed herself and her new "Face to Face With Connie Chung" interview series from CBS' Monday lineup for next fall. The 43-year-old Chung, who is married to "A Current Affair" anchorman Maury Povich, 51, said she will do "Face to Face" specials instead of her series.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 4, 1990 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When "Saturday Night With Connie Chung" premiered last September, the CBS News magazine was strongly criticized as a star-driven, high-octane vehicle running down the road between news and entertainment. "Is this a news program or a date?" asked one former CBS News executive, noting the show's title and opening credits, a series of pastel portraits of newswoman Chung.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 1990 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
As Alaska crude oil continues to taint the beaches in Southern California this weekend, "Saturday Night With Connie Chung" tonight offers a re-creation of that other oil spill--the 11 million gallons dumped in Prince William Sound, Alaska by the Exxon Valdez last March. The CBS report (at 10 p.m. on Channels 2 and 8) comes while Joseph Hazelwood, the captain of the Valdez, is being tried in Anchorage on charges of reckless endangerment, criminal mischief and negligent discharge of oil.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 15, 1990 | DIANE HAITHMAN
CBS Broadcast Group president Howard Stringer, speaking at a news conference in Universal City on Sunday, defended the networks' use of re-creations on Connie Chung's prime-time news program. He said that audiences can recognize the difference between "hard news" stories and re-enactments of events used responsibly in public affairs programs such as Chung's. "We didn't set out to 'out-tabloid' anybody," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 11, 1989 | JANE HALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
CBS News' "Saturday Night With Connie Chung" may be moving away from its "dramatic re-enactments" of recent events--a technique that has been strongly criticized for confusing viewers about fact and fiction and undermining the credibility of network news.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 25, 1989 | HOWARD ROSENBERG
Are the stars out tonight? "PrimeTime Live" with Sam Donaldson and Diane Sawyer on ABC gets bigger headlines, but "Saturday Night With Connie Chung" on CBS is the new prime-time news series delivering the biggest performances. Rarely have the values of news and entertainment been so artfully merged, and with such rewarding results. On a sour note, rarely has the importance that TV news attaches to its own stars been more dramatically on display as well.
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