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Conor Cruise O Brien

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1990
There was a certain economy of motion in the Bush Administration's almost offhanded announcement Tuesday that it was willing to support--rather than simply discuss--sending a United Nations fact-finding mission to the Israeli-occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip. Unfortunately, regional reaction to the shift offered further proof of the frustrating limits to American influence in the area. Last week, Secretary of State James A.
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NEWS
November 20, 1996
Michael Ybarra's "The Rise and Fall of Our Heroes" (Nov. 13) raises a very important issue and demonstrates a serious problem in our society. As a 47-year-old baby boomer, I understand how the assassinations of the Kennedys and Martin Luther King, the frustration of the antiwar movement by the deceptions of President Johnson and the outcome of the Chicago convention, the whole careers of Richard Nixon and J. Edgar Hoover, and the aura of scandal around...
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 20, 2008 | Adam Bernstein, Bernstein is a writer for the Washington Post.
Conor Cruise O'Brien, a leading Irish author, politician and diplomat who rose to international prominence while leading a United Nations mission in the troubled Congo and remained an independent, often contrarian thinker amid religious strife of his own homeland, died Thursday at his home near Dublin. He was 91. No immediate cause of death was reported, but he had a mild stroke 10 years ago. O'Brien came from a family with a notable literary and political pedigree.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 2006 | From the Associated Press
Charles Haughey, who served four terms as Ireland's prime minister in a career overshadowed by ethical questions, died Tuesday after a long battle with cancer, his family said. He was 80. Haughey died at his mansion north of Dublin. His wife, Maureen, and their four children were at his bedside. He is expected to receive a state funeral, probably Friday. As leader of Ireland's most popular party, Fianna Fail, Haughey oversaw four scandal-marred governments.
NEWS
August 27, 1993 | TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leaders of Germany and France engaged in a public show of solidarity Thursday but appeared to make little headway in resolving the differences that have increasingly troubled one of the Continent's key relationships.
NEWS
August 6, 1987 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The South African government warned Wednesday that it will cut off its subsidies to universities unless they put an end to anti-apartheid protests on their campuses. F. W. de Klerk, the minister of national education, told the heads of universities that they will lose state funds unless they immediately take "all reasonable steps," as outlined by the government, to "maintain good order and discipline" and ensure "uninterrupted and undisturbed teaching and study."
NEWS
February 8, 1992 | WILLIAM TUOHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After a controversial lifetime in Irish politics, Prime Minister Charles J. Haughey has had what looks like his last hurrah. The 67-year-old man known to one and all as Charley has been replaced as prime minister-elect by a dedicated enemy in his own Fianna Fail Party, former Finance Minister Albert Reynolds, who will take over officially on Monday. As prime minister, Haughey (pronounced HAW-hee) governed more in the flamboyant, autocratic style of a Tammany Hall politico or Chicago's Richard J.
NEWS
April 4, 2000 | PATT DIROLL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
"She demonstrates that true public service is more than lip service," said Tom Hanks in Lincolnesque tones as he introduced Hillary Rodham Clinton to a capacity crowd in the Regent Beverly Wilshire ballroom on Tuesday. "She is a genuine woman of courage." The black-tie dinner, sponsored by Saks Fifth Avenue, raised $1.6 million for Cedars Sinai Women's Cancer Research.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 17, 2003 | Anthony Day, Special to The Times
To Begin the World Anew The Genius and Ambiguities of the American Founders Bernard Bailyn Alfred A. Knopf: 208 pp., $26 * From his lifetime to this day, Thomas Jefferson has been extravagantly praised and roughly, even savagely, treated. Some recent historians have called him a hypocrite, a writer of only modest abilities, a slave-owning racist and precursor of Theodore Bilbo and Strom Thurmond, an ineffectual dreamer miscast as the "apostle of freedom."
OPINION
November 22, 2008 | TIM RUTTEN
Some years ago, the Irish politician and writer Conor Cruise O'Brien proposed this taxonomy of intractable international conflicts. They could be divided, he said, into "problems," which have solutions, and "situations," which can only have outcomes. Among the most unyielding of the latter he placed South Africa, Northern Ireland and the Israeli-Palestinian impasse. At the time, O'Brien's dichotomy seemed an expression of tragic wisdom. History, however, has a way of humbling even the wise.
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