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Conrad Murray

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 21, 2013
Dr. David Adams is a Las Vegas anesthesiologist who had put Michael Jackson under four times for dental procedures. There were no complications, and the two had engaged in small talk. Then on a Sunday in late March 2009, as he was getting ready to go to church, Adams received a call from someone he had never heard of, cardiologist Conrad Murray, Jackson's personal physician. Murray asked that he meet them in his office on East Flamingo Road. Murray would later be convicted of involuntary manslaughter for administering the fatal dose of the anesthetic propofol to Jackson in June 2009 to help him sleep.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2013 | Jeff Gottlieb and Kate Mather
After 3 1/2 months of sometimes tedious testimony from medical experts and accountants, the Michael Jackson wrongful-death trial took a deeply personal turn this week as the singer's ex-wife provided emotional testimony about his life and struggles. Debbie Rowe elicited several laughs from the jurors, telling an attorney to "relax," and broke into tears on occasion. She said the King of Pop suffered chronic pain and thought of himself as "Elephant Man" because of a skin condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Matt Hamilton
Michael Jackson's ex-wife testified Wednesday that the singer used propofol to sleep on two occasions while giving concerts in Germany in the mid-1990s, the first evidence in the wrongful-death trial that he had previously used the powerful anesthetic - which eventually killed him - for other than medical procedures. Debbie Rowe said she and Jackson both called Dr. Allan Metzger, Jackson's internist, complaining the singer couldn't sleep. She said Jackson told her that sleeping pills hadn't worked and that "he was at the end of his rope.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 15, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb and Kate Mather
After 3 1/2 months of sometimes tedious testimony from medical experts and accountants, the  Michael Jackson wrongful-death trial took a deeply personal turn this week as the singer's ex-wife provided emotional testimony about his eccentric life and struggles. Debbie Rowe elicited several laughs from the jurors, telling an attorney to “relax,” and broke into tears on occasion. She said the King of Pop suffered chronic pain and thought of himself as “Elephant Man” because of a skin condition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Often in tears, Michael Jackson's ex-wife Debbie Rowe testified Wednesday that doctors seemed in competition to see who could give him the most powerful painkillers. “Michael had a very low pain tolerance, and his fear of pain was incredible, and I think the doctors took advantage of him that way,” said Rowe, the mother of the singer's two oldest children. Rowe spoke in a folksy, informal manner on the stand, coming across as someone who truly cared about the singer. Rowe said that dermatologist Arnold Klein took over Jackson's pain management but that plastic surgeon Steven Hoefflin would call the singer and say, "I have a better drug.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Debbie Rowe, Michael Jackson's ex-wife and mother of his two oldest children, is expected to take the witness stand Wednesday in the wrongful death lawsuit brought by the singer's family against concert promoter and producer AEG Live. Rowe is expected to testify about their lives together and his drug use. Jackson met Rowe in 1996 while she was working as a nurse in the Beverly Hills office of his dermatologist, Dr. Arnold Klein. She agreed to give Jackson full custody of Prince and Paris three years later.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 14, 2013 | By Matt Hamilton
When Michael Jackson couldn't sleep while touring Europe in the mid-1990s, his Munich hotel room was converted to a surgical suite, outfitted to administer the powerful anesthetic propofol, his ex-wife testified Wednesday. Debbie Rowe told jurors Jackson always had difficulty sleeping, but while on his European tour, his sleep disorder “kicked in high gear.” Rowe and Jackson, who were married at the time, contacted Dr. Allan Metzger, the singer's internist. Metzger arranged for a German medical team to administer propofol to the singer for eight hours, Rowe said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
Despite receiving millions of dollars annually from his song catalogs, Michael Jackson year after year spent more than he earned, including $30 million in annual debt payments, a forensic accountant testified Monday. William R. Ackerman, testifying as a defense witness on behalf of AEG Live in the wrongful-death trial, offered a detailed look at the singer's finances, telling jurors that Jackson spent money on donations to charity, gifts, travel, art and furniture. "He spent a lot of money on jewelry," Ackerman said with a chuckle.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2013 | By Jeff Gottlieb
The judge in the Michael Jackson wrongful death lawsuit said Thursday that she doesn't expect the case, now in its fourth month, to go to the jury before late September. Superior Court Judge Yvette Palazuelos said she thought jurors needed an update on the case, which has moved slowly. One juror, according to the judge, had signaled that the end of August was a “drop dead date.” The judge did not address what will happen at that time, but it raises the question of whether an alternate will take the juror's place.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 6, 2013 | By Kate Mather
The attorney hired by AEG to draft Conrad Murray's contract for Michael Jackson's ill-fated “This Is It” tour testified Thursday that the the doctor had requested a CPR machine and a back-up physician. Kathy Jorrie, an outside attorney who has long worked for AEG, said when she began the negotiations in June 2009, tour accountant Timm Woolley told her Murray was the singer's personal physician and would provide general medical services during the 50-show London tour. During questioning by AEG attorney Jessica Stebbins-Bina, Jorrie said she spoke to Murray twice on the phone during the negotiation process, which produced three drafts of the contract the doctor ultimately signed.
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