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Consent

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WORLD
March 21, 2013 | By Mark Magnier
REWARI, India -- India passed anti-rape legislation Thursday that included a controversial provision setting the age of sexual consent at 18. Reformers argued the law, which was passed in a hurried response to public anger over the fatal mid-December rape of a 23-year old physiotherapy student, should set the age at 16 to prevent wrongful arrests in a changing society. However, conservatives prevailed, fearful a lower age would encourage premarital sex and undermine Indian morality.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
March 17, 2014 | By Michael Shermer
The New Jersey Motor Vehicle Commission last week voted to prohibit Tesla from selling its electric vehicles directly to consumers, a decision endorsed by the New Jersey Coalition of Automotive Retailers and Gov. Chris Christie. New Jersey is the third state, after Texas and Arizona, to block Tesla from direct sales, all under the guise of protecting consumers. Some free market. Of course, auto dealers prefer an arrangement in which they have exclusive rights to sell a certain manufacturer's product.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 19, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
The Beverly Hills fertility doctor who assisted Nadya Suleman in conceiving octuplets was cited by federal regulators for using an experimental procedure without her informed consent, according to testimony Thursday at a state medical board hearing in downtown Los Angeles. Dr. Michael Kamrava's medical license could be revoked if it is determined that he was grossly negligent in his treatment of Suleman and two other female patients: a 48-year-old who suffered complications after she became pregnant with quadruplets and a 42-year-old diagnosed with advanced ovarian cancer after receiving fertility treatments.
NATIONAL
February 25, 2014 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - Police officers may enter and search a home without a warrant as long as one occupant consents, even if another resident has previously objected, the Supreme Court ruled Tuesday in a Los Angeles case. The 6-3 ruling, triggered by a Los Angeles Police Department arrest in 2009, gives authorities more leeway to search homes without obtaining a warrant, even when there is no emergency. The majority, led by Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr., said police need not take the time to get a magistrate's approval before entering a home in such cases.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc
A Montana judge has come under fire after handing down a 30-day sentence to a former high school teacher convicted of raping a 14-year-old student and for making statements in court that the victim was "older than her chronological age" and "as much in control of the situation" as her teacher. Outrage is particularly sharp in Billings, where the crime took place, because the girl committed suicide in 2010, just shy of her 17th birthday, as the criminal case was pending. A protest was planned for Thursday, and organizers have called on Montana District Judge G. Todd Baugh to resign.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 1989 | DAVID SMOLLAR, Times Staff Writer
A student dashed into the nurse's office at Los Angeles High School the other morning and asked for an aspirin to relieve his headache. Sorry, the aide said, but the nurse's office cannot dispense medicine. But why not try the school health clinic on the other side of the counter, which offers a complete menu of medical services? So the student moved to the other side of the waiting room and asked the clinic receptionist for an aspirin. Are you a member of the clinic? Have your parents filled out the consent form?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2003 | Maura Dolan, Times Staff Writer
A man may be convicted of rape if his sexual partner first consents but later changes her mind and asks him to stop, the California Supreme Court ruled Monday. In a 6-1 decision, the state high court said a man who continues sexual intercourse with a woman once she has retracted her consent can be charged with rape. The court ruled in a date rape case involving teenagers at a party in El Dorado County.
OPINION
January 22, 2012 | By Meghan Rhoad
A federal appeals court this month upheld a Texas law that requires a woman seeking an abortion to undergo a sonogram, forces doctors to describe that sonogram in detail to her and then requires that she wait 24 hours before she can undergo the procedure. Texas was one of five states to adopt mandatory sonogram laws last year. Proponents insist these laws are about informed consent and making sure women have all the details about the procedure. They are not. The laws are about one thing only: erecting obstacles to abortion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 13, 2010 | Molly Hennessy-Fiske
When a doctor at Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles called in 2007 to tell Eduardo Rivas that his 6-month-old son needed surgery to repair double hernias, Rivas was not sure what he should do. Nathan had been born four months premature. His mother, Rivas' wife, had died of breast cancer soon after his birth. Rivas had to decide on his own. What happened next is at the root of a $19-million civil lawsuit filed by Rivas against the hospital and two of his son's doctors. Rivas, a Spanish speaker, last week told the jury hearing the case in Los Angeles County Superior Court that he never consented to surgery that he says left his son brain-damaged.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 14, 2010 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske
A Los Angeles jury Tuesday found in favor of Childrens Hospital of Los Angeles and two doctors in a $19-million civil lawsuit filed by a Tujunga man who said they had operated on his infant son without his consent. Eduardo Rivas, 43, sued in Los Angeles County Superior Court in June, alleging that doctors had operated on his 6-month-old son, Nathan, to repair a double hernia in 2007 after he had refused permission. After the surgery, Nathan, who was born four months premature and arrived at the hospital with a nasal breathing tube, became dependent on a ventilator and feeding tube, according to Rivas' Beverly Hills-based lawyer, Nathaniel Friedman.
SPORTS
November 20, 2013 | Staff and Wire Reports
Prince Fielder was traded to the Texas Rangers in a blockbuster deal Wednesday night that sent second baseman Ian Kinsler to the Detroit Tigers. Detroit gave the Rangers $30 million as part of the trade, according to a person with knowledge of the deal. The person spoke on condition of anonymity because the amount of money exchanged was not revealed when the teams announced the move. Fielder had to consent to the trade before it could be completed. The big first baseman signed a $214-million, nine-year contract with the Tigers before the 2012 season that includes a limited no-trade provision.
NATIONAL
August 28, 2013 | By Christine Mai-Duc
A Montana judge has come under fire after handing down a 30-day sentence to a former high school teacher convicted of raping a 14-year-old student and for making statements in court that the victim was "older than her chronological age" and "as much in control of the situation" as her teacher. Outrage is particularly sharp in Billings, where the crime took place, because the girl committed suicide in 2010, just shy of her 17th birthday, as the criminal case was pending. A protest was planned for Thursday, and organizers have called on Montana District Judge G. Todd Baugh to resign.
BUSINESS
August 6, 2013 | By Joe Flint
Julie O'Malley has a message for Time Warner Cable and CBS. "Stop being greedy ... and stop holding customers hostage," the Los Angeles resident said after the signal for KCBS-TV Channel 2 went dark Friday. "What is wrong with you people?" O'Malley and more than 3 million people around the country are the collateral damage of a fight over money between two media giants. Besides Los Angeles, where KCBS-TV and KCAL-TV Channel 9 are dark, CBS-owned stations in New York and Dallas also are no longer being carried by Time Warner Cable systems there.
OPINION
July 19, 2013 | By Stefan Timmermans
This year marks the 50th anniversary of routine newborn screening in the United States. Since 1963, tens of millions of babies have had blood drawn from their heels to be tested for rare diseases. The program has unquestionably prevented tragedies. Screening for phenylketonuria, for example, has meant that newborns affected by the condition can be placed on a special diet in the first days of life, thereby preventing mental retardation. Screening for sickle cell disease, congenital hypothyroidism and some other rare conditions has saved lives as well.
BUSINESS
July 8, 2013 | By Marina Villeneuve
WASHINGTON - Internet groups complained Monday that new Federal Trade Commission regulations to protect children's privacy online are financially burdensome to start-up companies. Under regulations that went into effect July 1, websites catering to children will no longer be able to collect a range of identifying information without obtaining verifiable parental consent. The child protection regulations will now hold the owners of sites and apps frequented by children responsible for third-party services - such as plug-ins or ads - that collect personal information from visitors who say they're younger than 13. The third-party services will be held liable only if the FTC can prove they knowingly collected personal information from children.
OPINION
May 27, 2013 | Jim Newton
Although it was drowned out by the mayor's race, Los Angeles quietly marked a historic moment this month: On May 15, after 12 years of policing the city under the eye of a federal judge, the Los Angeles Police Department at last was allowed to return to managing itself. That marks the end of a contentious yet intensely productive era, and it is a signal triumph for the man most responsible, Gerald Chaleff, who negotiated the consent decree in 2001, who oversaw its implementation and who witnessed its expiration.
HEALTH
March 23, 2010 | By Kelly Brewington
Sixty years after Henrietta Lacks died of cervical cancer, her cells live on in laboratories around the globe. Collected by Johns Hopkins researchers as she was being treated, the cells grew incessantly — and they've since helped scientists make blockbuster medical advances, including cancer treatments and the polio vaccine. Decades passed before anyone told Lacks' relatives of her enduring gift to modern science. And though the advances that have come from her cells are worth millions, her family never received a cent.
OPINION
July 19, 2013 | By Stefan Timmermans
This year marks the 50th anniversary of routine newborn screening in the United States. Since 1963, tens of millions of babies have had blood drawn from their heels to be tested for rare diseases. The program has unquestionably prevented tragedies. Screening for phenylketonuria, for example, has meant that newborns affected by the condition can be placed on a special diet in the first days of life, thereby preventing mental retardation. Screening for sickle cell disease, congenital hypothyroidism and some other rare conditions has saved lives as well.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2013
The federal judge who oversaw a dramatic, forced transformation of the Los Angeles Police Department has freed the department from the final vestiges of federal oversight. In a brief, three-line order Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Gary Feess formally lifted the binding agreement the U.S. Department of Justice imposed on the LAPD in 2001, which spelled out dozens of major reforms the police agency had to implement and frequent audits it was required to undergo by a monitor who reported to Feess.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 16, 2013 | By Joel Rubin
The federal judge who oversaw a dramatic, forced transformation of the Los Angeles Police Department has freed the department from the final vestiges of federal oversight. In a brief, three-line order Wednesday, U.S. District Judge Gary Feess formally lifted the binding agreement the U.S. Department of Justice imposed on the LAPD in 2001, which spelled out dozens of major reforms the police agency had to implement and frequent audits it was required to undergo by a monitor who reported to Feess.
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