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Conservation

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 1998 | FRANK MESSINA
Asking people to conserve water after a week of rainstorms might sound odd, but that's exactly what water officials are requesting. Starting Monday, scheduled maintenance on a Yorba Linda water plant will force the shutdown of pipes that supply several North and South County cities. The shutdown will last for four days, prompting the conservation request from the Municipal Water District of Orange County. "We just want to err on the side of caution," district spokesman Keith Coolidge said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1997
Southern California Water Co. will present a $17,000 check today to the Los Alamitos High School Choir for its water conservation efforts. Members helped the company distribute 1,150 of its ultra-low-flush toilets to residents citywide. In return, the company agreed to give students $15 for each one. The toilets are designed to save about five gallons of water per flush. Regular toilets use about seven gallons a flush; the low-flush toilets use about 1.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 19, 1991 | ERIK HAMILTON
The City Council this week implemented the first phase of the city's five-part emergency water conservation ordinance. Phase One, effective April 25, is a voluntary measure aimed at reducing water use by 10%. It asks residents to cease hosing down driveways, sidewalks, parking lots or other paved surfaces, recommends restrictions on vehicle washing and requests that restaurants serve water only on request.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 16, 1988
An association of realtors charged that a new Los Angeles water-conservation ordinance is unworkable and would cost people selling their houses as much as $200. The ordinance, which is scheduled to take effect Oct. 13, will require people selling their houses to hire certified inspectors because the city's 14 inspectors--who would charge $26--would be overburdened with the average monthly sale of 3,100 homes in the city, the Los Angeles Board of Realtors said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 11, 1990 | MARY HELEN BERG
The city this week adopted a voluntary water conservation program that officials hope will reduce water use by 10%. The resolution recommends that restaurants serve drinking water only on request and urges residents to install low-flow plumbing fixtures, fix leaky pipes and faucets and turn off decorative fountains.
NEWS
March 10, 1992 | FREDERICK M. MUIR, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As state water officials Monday announced a significant increase in water availability, a Metropolitan Water District committee proposed rolling back conservation restrictions in its six-county region by nearly half. The MWD action, if adopted today, will probably set off a chain reaction in which hundreds of smaller agencies that purchase water from the MWD will further ease restrictions or abandon their conservation rules.
NEWS
April 22, 2001 | PETER H. KING
One can make a day of any size, and regulate the rising and setting of his own sun and the brightness of its shining. --John Muir, 1875 * And so this is Earth Day. Across the country, community events large and small will be staged to underscore environmental concerns and opportunities. In Manhattan, marchers will move from Times Square to the United Nations for a rally against global warming. In Tampa, Fla., there will be training for volunteer "frog listeners."
NEWS
April 11, 1990
In response to drought warnings from state water officials, the Orange County Board of Supervisors on Tuesday unanimously passed a resolution urging residents to voluntarily cut water consumption by at least 10%. The resolution urges water suppliers to push conservation proposals and asks restaurants to post notices telling patrons that water will be served only to those who ask for it.
OPINION
April 17, 2004
Re "2 Competing Visions for Open Space," April 12: The city of Pico Rivera is embarking on a misguided vision for the San Gabriel River. Riparian or streamside habitats in Southern California have been severely altered since the 1850s. Conservative estimates state that roughly 95% of these habitats have been destroyed in the state. Building a golf course, as opposed to restoring natural habitat, would further erode the fragile ecosystems that struggle to hold on to life along the San Gabriel River.
NEWS
July 27, 1991 | VIRGINIA ELLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Less than a month after a 14% rate increase took effect, Metropolitan Water District officials quietly began taking steps Friday to impose an additional 40% rate increase on Southern California users to offset mounting costs for conservation and construction programs.
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