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Constitution U S

NEWS
April 29, 1999 | From Associated Press
A constitutional amendment banning flag desecration appears to have its best chance of passage in years, thanks to a change in Senate membership and second thoughts by some lawmakers opposed in the past. Activists predict that one to three votes could determine the outcome. The proposal fell three votes short in 1995, the last time it was before the Senate. At issue is the same one-sentence proposal that got more than the two-thirds majority in the House in 1997.
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NEWS
February 20, 1999 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Clinton said Friday that the conclusion of the impeachment process against him had, in effect, "re-ratified" the Constitution and proved that if the public believes a president is working for them, they will stand by him. "I have learned, again, an enormous amount of respect for our Constitution, our framers and for the American people," Clinton said at his first news conference since the Senate acquitted him of two articles of impeachment last week.
NEWS
December 19, 1998 | DAVID G. SAVAGE and MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
True or false? Every factual claim made in the course of the impeachment debate is subject to factual review by members of the House Judiciary Committee. But that did not put a stop to the litany of charges and countercharges of questionable accuracy in Friday's debate. Some of the most contentious claims: Question. Is censure constitutional or not? Answer.
NEWS
May 6, 1998 | From Associated Press
Gov. Fob James has told the U.S. Supreme Court that he believes government officials should defy high court decisions they consider unconstitutional. James made the comments in written arguments filed Friday asking the Supreme Court to overturn the decision of a judge who limited religious practices in DeKalb County schools. On Monday, the governor asked the U.S. 11th Circuit Court of Appeals to reverse U.S. District Judge Ira DeMent.
NEWS
March 29, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The average American family spends about 40% of its income on local, state and federal taxes, a fact that prompted two Republican congressmen to propose a constitutional amendment that would make it harder to raise federal taxes. Rep. Joe Barton (R-Texas) and Rep. John B. Shadegg (R-Ariz.) back an amendment that would require a two-thirds vote of both the House and the Senate to enact any new taxes. Barton and Shadegg were responding to President Clinton's weekly radio address.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 1998 | Associated Press
The House Judiciary Committee, giving religious conservatives a long-sought victory, has approved a proposal to amend the Constitution to protect "the people's right to pray and to recognize their religious beliefs, heritage or traditions on public property." The amendment would also, for the first time, put the word God in the Constitution. The vote this past Wednesday followed party lines, with 16 Republicans outvoting the 11 Democrats on the committee. Reaction was similarly predictable.
NEWS
June 19, 1997 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the 105th Congress, it seems proposals to amend the U.S. Constitution have become the solution of first resort. So far, 99 proposals to change the Constitution have been introduced this year in the House or Senate. Although most have yet to be acted upon, last week the House passed, 310 to 114, a proposed amendment that would outlaw the "desecration of the flag."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 24, 1997 | HENRY WEINSTEIN, TIMES LEGAL AFFAIRS WRITER
Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, speaking in Los Angeles on Thursday, vigorously defended his belief that the Constitution should be interpreted literally. In an address to 900 people at a packed ballroom in a downtown hotel, Scalia blasted those who seek to read new rights--such as abortion--into the Constitution. He said that such an "evolutionist" approach to constitutional interpretation strips the document of the "immovable" power it should have in a democracy.
NEWS
June 26, 1996 | JOHN M. BRODER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Moving to wrap himself in a popular issue already embraced by his likely Republican opponent, President Clinton on Tuesday advocated amending the Constitution to enshrine the rights of victims of crime. Clinton has opposed several constitutional amendments proposed in recent years, saying that the document is "sacred" and should not be tampered with lightly.
NEWS
August 31, 1995 | LARRY B. STAMMER and RICHARD LEE COLVIN, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A coalition of old-line religious leaders and liberal activists stepped up their opposition Wednesday to a proposed constitutional amendment allowing prayer in public schools, saying that existing law makes such an amendment unnecessary. Public schools are neither religion-free zones nor venues for imposing religious beliefs on students who do not agree, they said, echoing new federal guidelines on school prayer issued earlier this month by the Clinton Administration.
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