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BUSINESS
February 13, 2011 | By Lew Sichelman
With interest rates near rock-bottom levels, most people realize it's only a matter of time before loan costs start to rise. After all, what comes down in the mortgage world always has a way of going up. But what seems to be forgotten is that construction costs also will eventually go back up too. And the rumblings of that phenomenon are already being felt in most building-product categories. The question now is, how long can home builders hold out before they start raising their prices to reflect higher production costs?
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 2014 | By Dan Weikel
Construction costs and revenue estimates for the California bullet train are headed downward while operating costs and ridership for the proposed statewide system are expected to increase above earlier forecasts, according to the project's latest business plan unveiled Friday. The draft plan summarizes the work of the California High-Speed Rail Authority during the past two years, contains revisions of ridership and cost estimates made in the 2012 business plan and describes the project's future goals, including the possibility of attracting private sector partners.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 26, 1998 | LINN GROVES
In an effort to save as much as 30% in construction costs, the City Council this week combined four road projects in Doheny Village, for a total cost of about $750,000. As part of the package, the council approved a design contract to improve Doheny Park Road. Work also will take place on Las Vegas Avenue, Domingo Avenue and Victoria Boulevard. Funds for the projects will come from the city's 1999-2000 fiscal year budget; construction is expected to begin around that time, according to Robert A.
WORLD
January 19, 2014 | By Sergei L. Loiko
MOSCOW - President Vladimir Putin said Russian authorities will "do our best" to prevent terrorist attacks at the Sochi Winter Olympics, which will take place in the shadow of an Islamist insurgency in the restive Caucasus region. "We have a perfect understanding of the scope of the threat and how to deal with it and how to prevent it," Putin said in an interview broadcast Sunday. "I hope that our law enforcement agencies will deal with it with honor and dignity, the way it was during other major sports and political events.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 1, 1990 | ALLAN PARACHINI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Occidental Petroleum Corp. on Tuesday denied that it ever attempted to conceal construction costs of a Westwood museum being built to house the art collection of company chairman Armand Hammer. Ronald Asquith, the Occidental vice president in charge of construction of the Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center, said in an affidavit filed in Wilmington, Del., that allegations that Occidental engaged in a scheme to artificially lower the apparent cost of the museum "are false."
OPINION
October 2, 2012
Re "Council clears path for stadium," Sept. 29 Robert Kraft, owner of the NFL's New England Patriots, tried to have a new football stadium built in Boston, Providence, R.I., and Hartford, Conn., with public and private financing. These plans fell through. Kraft paid all construction costs and built a stadium in Foxboro, Mass., that opened in 2002. Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas, cost $1.15 billion to build. Arlington's sales tax was raised by half a cent, its hotel tax was raised 2 percentage points and the car rental tax was raised by 5 percentage points.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2012 | By Wesley Lowery, Los Angeles Times
The Skid Row Housing Trust has spent decades revitalizing abandoned buildings and hotels in downtown Los Angeles' most destitute neighborhood to serve as shelter for the city's chronically homeless. But for its latest housing project, the trust abandoned its usual technique for a seemingly elementary construction concept. A 102-unit, $20.5-million complex is being built by stacking pre-outfitted apartments atop one another in a Lego-like fashion, limiting construction costs and fast-forwarding the project timeline.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 7, 2009
Thank you for the fascinating glimpse at LAUSD's new arts high school ("Pass/Fail" by Christopher Hawthorne, May 31). With its three curvilinear elements studded with references to the designs of Le Corbusier, its stunning, cone-shaped library, its soaring lobby, its community college-sized football field, its 950-seat theater, and my favorite elements, its controversial 140-foot tower (nonfunctional, naturally) and dramatically wide front entrance staircase (unusable because of a security gate)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 6, 1991
Regarding the current crisis in local, federal and state jail and prison systems: Several years ago I offered a solution to a different state administration--a long-term or temporary plan, one which was cheap, efficient, and an answer to the never-ending NIMBY (Not In My Back Yard) problem. The state has about 800 miles bordering the Pacific Ocean, all touching the most populous counties. Why not convert some of our surplus or mothballed, outdated aircraft carriers or battleships into prison ships?
NEWS
August 21, 1985
State public utility regulators are expected to rule today on how much of disputed construction costs for the $1-billion Helms Creek hydroelectric plant should be shouldered by utility stockholders and how much by rate payers.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been corrected. See note below for details.
MOSCOW -- Exactly a year before the 2014 winter Olympics in the Russian city of Sochi, President Vladimir Putin fired a highly placed official Thursday after personally inspecting the construction process the day before. Akhmed Bilalov, vice president of the national Olympic Committee, lost his job because of delays and overspending in the construction of the ski-jump complex Russki Gorki in Krasnaya Polyana, which is part of the "mountain cluster" that will serve as a hub of Sochi Olympic events.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 2012 | By Wesley Lowery, Los Angeles Times
The Skid Row Housing Trust has spent decades revitalizing abandoned buildings and hotels in downtown Los Angeles' most destitute neighborhood to serve as shelter for the city's chronically homeless. But for its latest housing project, the trust abandoned its usual technique for a seemingly elementary construction concept. A 102-unit, $20.5-million complex is being built by stacking pre-outfitted apartments atop one another in a Lego-like fashion, limiting construction costs and fast-forwarding the project timeline.
OPINION
October 2, 2012
Re "Council clears path for stadium," Sept. 29 Robert Kraft, owner of the NFL's New England Patriots, tried to have a new football stadium built in Boston, Providence, R.I., and Hartford, Conn., with public and private financing. These plans fell through. Kraft paid all construction costs and built a stadium in Foxboro, Mass., that opened in 2002. Cowboys Stadium in Arlington, Texas, cost $1.15 billion to build. Arlington's sales tax was raised by half a cent, its hotel tax was raised 2 percentage points and the car rental tax was raised by 5 percentage points.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 2011 | By Ralph Vartabedian, Los Angeles Times
Investors may not be willing to back the state's bullet train project until after it begins operating, the California High-Speed Rail Authority said in a letter to key legislators, an acknowledgment that again raises serious questions about how the $43-billion construction cost will be paid over the next decade. The letter gives a preview of the authority's upcoming business plan, a critical document that is supposed to address long-standing concerns that it lacks a credible blueprint for building and operating the system.
BUSINESS
September 11, 2011 | By Lew Sichelman
You won't believe the stuff that Jay Markanich has seen on his rounds as a home inspector in northern Virginia. Among other things: exhaust fans that vent to nowhere, faulty drain line connections, drywall screws used for everything but their intended purpose, insulation thrown into wall cavities but not stapled to the studs, decks so riddled with nails shot from power guns that they cause the wood to split. The kicker? This is new construction. Not remodeling projects but brand-new houses that have never been lived in. Markanich blames the shoddy workmanship he is seeing these days on subcontractors who hire workers from the groups of unemployed people hanging around local stores.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2011 | By Gale Holland and Michael Finnegan, Los Angeles Times
The Los Angeles Community College District will set up an independent citizens panel to review "the very serious issues" plaguing its $5.7-billion campus rebuilding program, Chancellor Daniel LaVista has announced. The construction program "must be reassessed in an effort to resolve legitimate issues on the remaining projects, complete future projects effectively and demonstrate the district's commitment to program integrity," LaVista wrote in a newsletter sent late Monday to college faculty and staff.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1986
An overheard suggestion that there be a Smithsonian West in the "Ziggurat" is a good idea because a Smithsonian West could create a more equitable distribution of the Smithsonian's resources among the people of the United States. Orange County's rising importance as a cultural center, its benign climate and its easy accessibility to a great number of people make it a ideal location for such an institution, and the use of the Ziggurat for such a purpose would provide a great saving in site acquisition and construction costs.
REAL ESTATE
October 26, 1986
I was very pleased to read your analysis (Oct. 5) of rent control. As a small-property owner in Santa Monica, I am amazed at the brutality of radical rent control. Construction costs and the expense of maintaining apartments are published frequently by the U.S. government and are available at a very nominal price. The rent control board completely ignores the financial information available and fabricates its own numbers, resulting in the very minimal rent increases of about 2% per year.
BUSINESS
February 13, 2011 | By Lew Sichelman
With interest rates near rock-bottom levels, most people realize it's only a matter of time before loan costs start to rise. After all, what comes down in the mortgage world always has a way of going up. But what seems to be forgotten is that construction costs also will eventually go back up too. And the rumblings of that phenomenon are already being felt in most building-product categories. The question now is, how long can home builders hold out before they start raising their prices to reflect higher production costs?
OPINION
December 15, 2010
Who's in charge? Re "Obama enlists help in tax-cut battle," Dec. 11 Not too long ago, he was touted as an intellectual eminence, the measured, cosmopolitan orator, the man of audacity who would change the way business was done in Washington. Barack Obama was the messianic vanquisher of the Clinton machine. Now, President Obama has had to enlist Bill Clinton to stave off a massive revolt from the "backbenchers" in Congress. And Clinton obliged. He moved to the White House podium and held court there with the natural and commanding ease of a prince returning to his palace.
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