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Consultants Wages And Salaries

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2001 | GEORGE SKELTON
For a smart politician, Gov. Gray Davis sure looked like a dim bulb when he put two public relations consultants on state pay at $30,000 a month. It brought him instant bad PR. The governor is paying these hired guns more than double what he himself makes monthly ($13,750) and at least three times what their predecessor, Phil Trounstine, got as Davis' communications director. Although the $30,000 is for both consultants combined, it's pay for one job. Neither is pulling down full-time duty.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2001 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Davis administration is paying a young business consultant with barely a year's experience in the energy industry $240,000 annually to head a team of traders who secure California's daily electricity supply. State officials hired Susan T. Lee, 30, in April without competitive bidding under an emergency declaration by Gov. Gray Davis. Lee's contract is equal to the $20,000 a month that Davis pays his chief energy advisor, S. David Freeman, a top utility executive for decades.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2001 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under continuing pressure for employing two well-known Democratic communications strategists on the public payroll, Gov. Gray Davis announced late Friday that he had scrapped their deal. In a statement released at 7:42 p.m., Davis announced that he had dropped a controversial contract with high-priced communications consultants Mark Fabiani and Chris Lehane. Davis' statement said that Fabiani left state service altogether, and that Lehane would work for a lower fee.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 30, 2001 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Under continuing pressure for employing two well-known Democratic communications strategists on the public payroll, Gov. Gray Davis announced late Friday that he had scrapped their deal. In a statement released at 7:42 p.m., Davis announced that he had dropped a controversial contract with high-priced communications consultants Mark Fabiani and Chris Lehane. Davis' statement said that Fabiani left state service altogether, and that Lehane would work for a lower fee.
BUSINESS
April 21, 1998 | Patrice Apodaca
A visionary, it appears, is worth less than a CEO. At least that's the case at Irvine-based Mossimo Inc., where the going rate for the talents of founder Mossimo Giannulli, the self-anointed visionary--that's his official title--is $300,000 a year. The amount represents a 40% pay cut from 1997, when Giannulli was chief executive and earning $500,000. Giannulli's pay was disclosed in the apparel designer's annual proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 4, 2001 | JEFFREY L. RABIN and DARYL KELLEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The Davis administration is paying a young business consultant with barely a year's experience in the energy industry $240,000 annually to head a team of traders who secure California's daily electricity supply. State officials hired Susan T. Lee, 30, in April without competitive bidding under an emergency declaration by Gov. Gray Davis. Lee's contract is equal to the $20,000 a month that Davis pays his chief energy advisor, S. David Freeman, a top utility executive for decades.
NEWS
March 10, 1996 | VIRGINIA ELLIS and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After six months of grass-roots organizing for Gov. Pete Wilson's presidential bid, Mitch Zak suddenly found himself out of work when the campaign fizzled last fall. But Wilson took care of him. Within weeks, Zak was installed as a special assistant to the state Fish and Game director. His new salary was 80% higher than his old one as a governor's office assistant--a job that he quit to stump for Wilson.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2001 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican legislative leaders Monday blasted Gov. Gray Davis' decision to spend $30,000 a month in taxpayer money to retain communications consultants known for their highly partisan work. Labeling consultants Mark Fabiani and Chris Lehane as "cut-throat," Senate GOP leader Jim Brulte of Rancho Cucamonga and Assembly Republican leader Dave Cox of Fair Oaks said in a letter to Davis that the hiring "undermines the assertions you have made both publicly and privately throughout this crisis."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 18, 2001 | GEORGE SKELTON
For a smart politician, Gov. Gray Davis sure looked like a dim bulb when he put two public relations consultants on state pay at $30,000 a month. It brought him instant bad PR. The governor is paying these hired guns more than double what he himself makes monthly ($13,750) and at least three times what their predecessor, Phil Trounstine, got as Davis' communications director. Although the $30,000 is for both consultants combined, it's pay for one job. Neither is pulling down full-time duty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 22, 2001 | DAN MORAIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Republican legislative leaders Monday blasted Gov. Gray Davis' decision to spend $30,000 a month in taxpayer money to retain communications consultants known for their highly partisan work. Labeling consultants Mark Fabiani and Chris Lehane as "cut-throat," Senate GOP leader Jim Brulte of Rancho Cucamonga and Assembly Republican leader Dave Cox of Fair Oaks said in a letter to Davis that the hiring "undermines the assertions you have made both publicly and privately throughout this crisis."
BUSINESS
April 21, 1998 | Patrice Apodaca
A visionary, it appears, is worth less than a CEO. At least that's the case at Irvine-based Mossimo Inc., where the going rate for the talents of founder Mossimo Giannulli, the self-anointed visionary--that's his official title--is $300,000 a year. The amount represents a 40% pay cut from 1997, when Giannulli was chief executive and earning $500,000. Giannulli's pay was disclosed in the apparel designer's annual proxy statement filed with the Securities and Exchange Commission.
NEWS
March 10, 1996 | VIRGINIA ELLIS and PAUL JACOBS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
After six months of grass-roots organizing for Gov. Pete Wilson's presidential bid, Mitch Zak suddenly found himself out of work when the campaign fizzled last fall. But Wilson took care of him. Within weeks, Zak was installed as a special assistant to the state Fish and Game director. His new salary was 80% higher than his old one as a governor's office assistant--a job that he quit to stump for Wilson.
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