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BUSINESS
December 22, 2011 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
Microsoft Corp., a 20-year stalwart of the annual Consumer Electronics Show, has decided to pull out of the largest trade show of its kind. The company's chief executive often gave the keynote address, highlighting its own products and broader tech trends. But the company said it would stop doing so after the 2012 CES. It also will no longer have an exhibit. CES is one of the world's largest trade shows and annually attracts more than 100,000 visitors to Las Vegas from all over the globe.
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BUSINESS
January 17, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Some day, the Hershey chocolate you eat may come in all sorts of weird shapes and sizes. The Hershey Co. this week announced it has agreed to a multiyear partnership with 3D Systems, a company known for building a 3D printer capable of creating objects out of foods, including chocolate. "Whether it's creating a whole new form of candy or developing a new way to produce it, we embrace new technologies such as 3D printing as a way to keep moving our timeless confectionery treats into the future,” said William Papa, The Hershey Co.'s chief research and development officer, in a statement . PHOTOS: Top 10 tech gadgets we want to see in 2014 Hershey is the first major food company to jump into 3D printing and it could pay off for the chocolate maker should 3D-printed confectioneries take off. 3D Systems gained some attention earlier this month at the Consumer Electronics Show where it showcased the ChefJet, which was printing chocolate objects at the electronics convention.
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BUSINESS
January 4, 2013 | By Andrea Chang and Chris O'Brien, Los Angeles Times
The International Consumer Electronics Show next week may be facing questions about its relevance in an Internet world that makes new things seem old in minutes, but it is still the foremost gathering for all things gadgety and geeky. The annual trade show in Las Vegas has a rich past showcasing such groundbreaking devices as the VCR, the CD player, the camcorder, high-definition television and the Blu-ray disc. "It was the singular most important technology event of the year," said Zack Zalon, a longtime show attendee and managing partner at the digital product design firm Wilshire Axon in Westwood.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2014 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski
LAS VEGAS - Local resident Tony Holdip stood admiring the latest technological lust object on display at the world's largest consumer electronics show as a friend joined a crowd of amateur photographers snapping pictures of the immense 110-inch Samsung TV. "This is unbelievable," Holdip said, and commented on the set's brightness and image clarity. "The only problem I can see with this is it's possibly too big. " The Samsung Electronics Co. television set represents the next generation in home entertainment, "ultra-high-definition," or "4K," TV sets that boast four times the resolution of HDTV displays found in American households.
BUSINESS
January 6, 2012 | By David Sarno, Los Angeles Times
As the Consumer Electronics Show kicks off, paper-thin TVs, feather-light laptops and thousands of humming doodads of every hue are filling up more than 30 football fields' worth of Las Vegas convention space. But if you're looking for a device with the potential to instantly change your life, your best bet might be across the street at the slot machines. The world's largest personal technology convention, which starts Monday, often sets the tone for the year in gadgetry, attracting the industry's biggest companies to its glitzy stages to showcase the latest innovations.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
LAS VEGAS - Tucked into the tiniest of corners of the gargantuan Consumer Electronics Show one night this week was Sonny Vu, the founder of Misfit. The Redwood City, Calif., company did not have an elaborately constructed trade booth with flashing lights or blaring dance music. It just had Vu, undeterred by his lack of props, standing next to a table displaying a few samples of Shine, the company's new activity monitor that's about the size and shape of a Nilla Wafer. Though the company and product are small, they are emblematic of the biggest trend on display this week at CES: This has become a golden age for consumer electronics start-ups.
BUSINESS
January 5, 1996 | LESLIE HELM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For nearly a decade, the consumer electronics industry has been witnessing an incredible series of advances in digital audio and video technology--but has experienced mostly frustration when it came to converting those technologies into mass-market products. But as the annual Consumer Electronics Show opens here today, many in the business are convinced that this long and paradoxical drought is finally at an end.
BUSINESS
January 7, 1995 | AMY HARMON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It wasn't long ago that exotic digital products with names like Newton and 3DO and Mini Disc were being tabbed as saviors of the consumer electronics industry, gadgets that would draw consumers into stores and reignite stagnant sales. At this year's Consumer Electronics Show here, it's clear that reignition has taken place.
NEWS
January 9, 1996 | DAVID COLKER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What if they gave a home electronics show and Microsoft didn't come? That's what happened over the weekend at the Consumer Electronics Show, a three-day extravaganza of electronic wizardry that in years past has been one of the primary showcases for new software, CD-ROMs and online services targeted toward the home user. There was a smattering of intriguing new items for the home computer user on the CES convention floor but less of the excitement and hubbub of years past.
BUSINESS
January 17, 2014 | By Salvador Rodriguez
Some day, the Hershey chocolate you eat may come in all sorts of weird shapes and sizes. The Hershey Co. this week announced it has agreed to a multiyear partnership with 3D Systems, a company known for building a 3D printer capable of creating objects out of foods, including chocolate. "Whether it's creating a whole new form of candy or developing a new way to produce it, we embrace new technologies such as 3D printing as a way to keep moving our timeless confectionery treats into the future,” said William Papa, The Hershey Co.'s chief research and development officer, in a statement . PHOTOS: Top 10 tech gadgets we want to see in 2014 Hershey is the first major food company to jump into 3D printing and it could pay off for the chocolate maker should 3D-printed confectioneries take off. 3D Systems gained some attention earlier this month at the Consumer Electronics Show where it showcased the ChefJet, which was printing chocolate objects at the electronics convention.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2014 | By Peter Pae
Detroit has invaded Las Vegas. With a dearth of eye-popping new gadgets coming out of the Consumer Electronics Show, attention has shifted to automobiles and all the cool electronics being stuffed into them. Nine automakers are at CES, and Jessica Naziri has been checking out many of them, including getting a test drive in a BMW i3 concept electric vehicle. Full CES 2014 coverage Join me, the Times' technology editor, and Naziri as we talk autos via Google+ Hangout at 1 p.m. PST today.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
LAS VEGAS - Tucked into the tiniest of corners of the gargantuan Consumer Electronics Show one night this week was Sonny Vu, the founder of Misfit. The Redwood City, Calif., company did not have an elaborately constructed trade booth with flashing lights or blaring dance music. It just had Vu, undeterred by his lack of props, standing next to a table displaying a few samples of Shine, the company's new activity monitor that's about the size and shape of a Nilla Wafer. Though the company and product are small, they are emblematic of the biggest trend on display this week at CES: This has become a golden age for consumer electronics start-ups.
BUSINESS
January 4, 2014 | By Chris O'Brien
To glimpse the future of consumer electronics, get a grip on the world's first Internet-connected tennis racket. With tiny sensors embedded in the handle, the racket measures a player's strokes, topspin and just about everything else that happens when the ball is struck. All that information is instantly relayed via a wireless Bluetooth connection to a smartphone app. The player can later view and analyze it on the Web. "It's going to be a huge change for the tennis player," said Thomas Otton, director of communications for Babolat, the French tennis company that invented the original cow-gut racket strings 140 years ago. "They are going to have access to all kinds of information and data that will help them progress much faster and have more fun. It's a true revolution.
AUTOS
January 2, 2014 | By Jerry Hirsch
Ford Motor Co. will debut a solar-powered plug-in hybrid at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas next week. The C-Max Solar Energi Concept has solar panels on its roof that can charge the vehicle's battery. If the technology proves viable in testing this year, Ford thinks it is a way to free some rechargable vehicles from wall sockets. But there's a catch. The solar panels on top of the C-Max can capture only enough energy to charge up the battery to about one-eighth full - good for maybe three miles of electric-powered driving - during the day. PHOTOS: Ten cheapest cars that get 35 mpg or better “While solar panels have been making strides in terms of efficiency, even if we put them on the hood, you still couldn't recharge the battery enough,” said Mike Tinskey, Ford's director of vehicle electrification and vehicle infrastructure.
BUSINESS
January 9, 2013 | By Chris O'Brien, Los Angeles Times
LAS VEGAS - Pity the poor laptop. The darling of the tech world just a couple of years ago, laptops have become one of the biggest casualties of the tablet phenomenon. For consumers enamored of touch-screen tablets, laptops suddenly seem like stale, clunky gadgets whose basic clamshell design hasn't changed all that much in two decades. It opens. It shuts. Yawn. But this week at the 2013 International Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas, the laptop is attempting a comeback.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2013 | Michelle Maltais
LAS VEGAS -- Just about everything with a battery or cord is on display in the desert, including massive-screen TVs, wearable tech and window-washing robots. The 2013 Consumer Electronics Show is underway in Las Vegas, and The Times has sent a gaggle of reporters to comb the convention center for what's next, best or a little offbeat. Tech reporter Andrea Chang and I chat about what we've seen so far in previews -- some of the hits, misses and a Microsoft head scratcher. Be sure to check our continuing coverage in live updates , on the Tech Now blog and follow us on Twitter . ALSO: CES 2013: Fisher-Price playing between virtual and real toys CES 2013: Drawing on creativity without touching your tablet CES 2013: Flower Power lets plants communicate their needs Follow Maltais on Twitter  @mmaltaisLAT
NEWS
January 11, 2008
Panasonic: An article in Business on Tuesday about the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas said Panasonic's new 150-inch TV was 11 feet tall. It is 11 feet wide and 6 1/4 feet tall.
NEWS
January 8, 2013 | By Jay Jones
Even if you're not going to the Consumer Electronics Show , running Tuesday through Friday in Las Vegas , you can still test drive one of the world's newest gadgets this week. With the right kind of smartphone you can find what's hot at certain hotels and even find out when a big jackpot last hit on a particular slot machine. The new product, called TecTile , will be unveiled Tuesday (today) at various Caesars Entertainment resorts on and near the Strip. The manufacturer, Samsung Mobile, is installing 4,500 programmable stickers throughout the various properties as a way to make information easier to access.  For example, visitors to Caesars Palace and Paris will be able to scan a sticker outside certain restaurants to view the menus and determine average check totals.
BUSINESS
January 8, 2013 | By Andrea Chang, Los Angeles Times
LAS VEGAS - At this year's International Consumer Electronics Show, everything is getting a bit "smarter. " Smartphones ushered in the notion that cellphones didn't have to be limited to just making calls, and tablets uprooted the definition of the personal computer. Now, the buzz at the world's largest tech gadget conference has shifted from the devices themselves to the growing crop of accessories and technologies that are piggybacking on their massive popularity. Connectivity is one of the main reasons smartphones and tablets became blockbuster hits among consumers, and tech manufacturers want to bring that feature to other objects - many of them everyday, non-digital household items.
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