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Consumer Financial Protection Bureau

BUSINESS
April 5, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard
Borrowers with student loans from private lenders need more flexible repayment plans and should be able to refinance at lower rates once they establish a solid record of making payments, a key advocate told the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Private student loans account for about $150 billion of the $1 trillion in educational loans that are being paid off - or not (see chart below) - by borrowers. The loans often carry variable interest rates that are significantly higher than federal loans, Consumers Union noted Friday in a letter to the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, which has asked for comment on the topic.
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BUSINESS
April 4, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Federal regulators are conducting an extensive investigation into an alleged mortgage insurance kickback scheme that pushed up costs for home buyers dating from the mid-1990s. The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, in disclosing its first action Thursday, said the investigation revolves around a scheme in which banks and other lenders required private mortgage insurers to seek backup insurance from lender-owned reinsurance companies. The backup insurance essentially was worthless and amounted to an improper payment to the lender by the mortgage insurer to acquire new customers, consumer bureau officials said.
BUSINESS
March 28, 2013 | By E. Scott Reckard, Los Angeles Times
Bank of America Corp., which handles customer service on about 15% of U.S. home loans, has accounted for 30% of the mortgage complaints logged by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, according to a new database made public by the federal watchdog. The level of customer discontent - far greater than at home-lending rivals Wells Fargo & Co. and JPMorgan Chase & Co. - reflects BofA's struggles since its 2008 acquisition of Countrywide Financial Corp. in Calabasas. Countrywide had become the No. 1 mortgage firm by specializing in subprime and other high-risk loans.
BUSINESS
March 13, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Senators questioned two of President Obama's nominees for key financial regulatory positions, and Democrats and Republicans appeared to like both of them. But only one of those candidates is expected to be confirmed. Mary Jo White, a former federal prosecutor, was on track to be confirmed as chairwoman of the Securities and Exchange Commission after Tuesday's hearing by the Senate Banking committee. However, the path for Richard Cordray, the director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau who has been renominated by Obama, was still blocked by Republicans who want changes to the agency.
BUSINESS
February 18, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON - Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-Mass.), a darling of liberals who has been mentioned as a potential 2016 presidential contender, had kept a deliberately low profile since her election in November. In less than five minutes last week, however, the new Massachusetts senator announced her presence in the nation's capital and showed she plans to be a thorn in the side of the big financial institutions. At her first hearing as a member of the Senate Banking Committee on Thursday, Warren chastised banking regulators for not trying to put more executives from big banks in jail for their roles in the financial crisis.
BUSINESS
January 24, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera and Andrew Tangel, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - In nominating former federal prosecutor Mary Jo White to head the Securities and Exchange Commission, President Obama aimed a strong message at potential Wall Street miscreants: Watch out. Obama amplified that decision Thursday by renominating Richard Cordray, a former state attorney general, as director of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. Cordray's controversial recess appointment to the 2-year-old agency expires at the end of the year. Obama said that White and Cordray were key to implementing the 2010 overhaul of financial regulations and protecting consumers and the financial system from the "kinds of abuse that nearly brought the economy to its knees.
BUSINESS
December 13, 2012 | By David Lazarus
Talk about karma. After lobbying ferociously to prevent Elizabeth Warren from running the new Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the banking industry now must contend with her sitting on the Senate Banking Committee. Rumors have circulated for weeks the Massachusetts senator-elect would be tapped for the gig overseeing the industry she so completely cheesed off with accusations of fraud and unfair play. Now it's official . You can almost hear the muttering among bankers about the tough-love they're going to face.
BUSINESS
November 20, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - Federal regulators have opened investigations into 19 financial companies for possible violations of new mortgage advertising rules designed to keep firms from misleading consumers about reverse mortgages and other products. In addition, the regulators have sent letters to 32 other firms warning them about advertisements that falsely imply a connection to a government program or provide other potentially misleading information. The actions, announced Monday, came after a review by the Federal Trade Commission and the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau of about 800 ads by mortgage lenders, mortgage brokers and other firms outside the conventional banking system.
BUSINESS
November 6, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Democrat Elizabeth Warren was projected to win the U.S. Senate race in Massachusetts on Tuesday night, vaulting one of Wall Street's most outspoken critics into a position of power in the nation's capital. Warren defeated incumbent Sen. Scott Brown, a moderate Republican, in one of the most expensive and hotly contested Senate campaigns in the nation. Wall Street and the rest of the financial industry had pumped about $6.2 million into the race in hopes of keeping Warren out of the Senate.
BUSINESS
October 25, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera, Los Angeles Times
MELROSE, Mass. - Wall Street's philosophy in one of the nation's most hotly contested Senate campaigns could be boiled down to an old proverb: The enemy of my enemy is my friend. The financial industry has poured more than $6.2 million in contributions into the U.S. Senate race in Massachusetts between incumbent Republican Scott Brown and Democratic challenger Elizabeth Warren, who has made the fight against Wall Street greed and corruption a cornerstone of her campaign. Nearly $9 of every $10 have gone to Brown, according to the Center for Responsive Politics.
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