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Consumer Satisfaction Index

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BUSINESS
May 15, 2007 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
If you're waiting for food at Pizza Hut and using your Samsung cellphone on the Sprint Nextel network to reserve a flight on United Airlines, you may be in for some disappointments. Those companies suffered some of the biggest drops in consumer satisfaction over the last year, according to the University of Michigan's closely watched American customer satisfaction index, which was released late Monday.
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BUSINESS
May 15, 2007 | James S. Granelli, Times Staff Writer
If you're waiting for food at Pizza Hut and using your Samsung cellphone on the Sprint Nextel network to reserve a flight on United Airlines, you may be in for some disappointments. Those companies suffered some of the biggest drops in consumer satisfaction over the last year, according to the University of Michigan's closely watched American customer satisfaction index, which was released late Monday.
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BUSINESS
September 19, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
Five Guys Burgers and Fries topped a new survey of favorite burger chains, leaving bigger chains such as McDonald's and Burger King in the dust. Market Force Information questioned 7,600 consumers, calculated the fan favorite based on total votes and then factored in the number of locations for each chain. In every region, Five Guys led the list. Overall, In-N-Out was second, followed by Fuddruckers, A&W and Smashburger. Dairy Queen ranked last in the group of 16 chains considered.
BUSINESS
October 26, 1994 | L.D. STRAUB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Consumers say the quality of goods and services available in the United States is merely satisfactory, according to a new consumer satisfaction survey released Tuesday by the American Society for Quality Control. The overall average rating in the survey is not high enough to protect U.S. industry from foreign competition, the Milwaukee-based organization said.
BUSINESS
June 21, 2012 | By Tiffany Hsu
McDonald's rules the fast food roost when it comes to revenue. But when customer satisfaction is at stake, the burger behemoth comes in dead last, according to a new survey. The American Consumer Satisfaction Index ranks pizza chain Papa John's first with an 83% rating, compared to an industry average of 80%. Subway and Little Caesar were next with 82% scores. McDonald's, with a 73% grade, sat at the bottom with its ledger full of sales but not as much customer satisfaction.
BUSINESS
November 7, 1995 | From Associated Press
U.S. consumers were less satisfied overall with the quality of goods and services in the past year, according to a survey released Monday. "The data suggest that speculation and conventional wisdom about a significant improvement in the quality of goods and services is somewhat off-base," University of Michigan economist Claes Fornell said Monday. Overall consumer satisfaction declined 1.1% between October, 1994, and last month as measured by the American consumer satisfaction index.
AUTOS
October 30, 2002 | John O'Dell, Times Staff Writer
Familiarity, it seems, does breed a bit of contempt. Auto buyers in the U.S. rarely rate domestic vehicles at the top of the heap in consumer satisfaction surveys, preferring instead benchmark makes such as Mercedes-Benz and BMW. It turns out that car owners in Germany don't like their domestics much either. They seem to prefer Japanese cars, rating them higher than most European makes in quality and reliability in J.D. Power & Associates' inaugural German consumer satisfaction index survey.
BUSINESS
March 27, 2013 | By Maria Halkias
The first civilian to run the military's $10-billion-a-year retail business is working to bring the enterprise into the modern age. The CEO of the Dallas-based Army & Air Force Exchange Service, Tom Shull, is the first retailer to hold the post. It had been held by military officers on a two-year basis for 117 years. Shull, 61, was named to the position last year and his tenure doesn't have a time limit. There had been many complaints about the service in the comments section of Military Times.
BUSINESS
April 22, 2012 | By Andrea Ahle
FORT WORTH — With pointy red gnome hats, a cruise giveaway and plenty of balloons, Travelocity turned sweet 16 last month. But it hasn't been all cupcakes and champagne for the travel website. Once considered a trailblazer, Travelocity has struggled for the last few years to keep up with competitors such as Expedia and Priceline. "We weren't moving as fast as we needed to," Chief Executive Carl Sparks said about newer, nimbler competitors. "We're 16 and so sometimes we think of ourselves as one of the elderly companies in the space because we were around since its inception.… Yet 16 is quite young for a multibillion-dollar company.
NEWS
February 20, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN
In these tough economic times, the share of the American car market held by foreign manufacturers has taken on a sense of national urgency. Foreign firms hold 36% of the American new car market, because consumers have increasingly decided they offer the best buys. But Detroit's Big Three are clearly getting better, according to several respected surveys. The surveys, by J. D.
BUSINESS
July 4, 2011 | Hugo Martin
U.S. air travelers already pay to check bags and buy onboard snacks, among other charges. But would they pay to avoid those long airport security lines? A sizable chunk of them would, according to a recent survey by the U.S. Travel Assn., the nationwide trade group that has been pushing the idea of a fee-based plan to unclog the gridlock at the country's airports. The survey of 1,007 Americans found that 45% of those questioned would be either "very" or "somewhat" likely to pay an annual fee of up to $150 to undergo a government background check to speed through a new, faster airport security line.
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