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NEWS
February 26, 2014
Bill Nagel joined the Los Angeles Times as Executive Vice President, Business Services in July 2009. In this role, Nagel is responsible for growing alternative revenue streams through the marketing and sales of The Times world-class print production, distribution and marketing services to other entities across Southern California. He is also responsible for business to consumer marketing for the Los Angeles Times Media Group's portfolio of products.  Previously, Nagel was Sr. Vice President of Business Channels for the San Diego Union-Tribune, overseeing both consumer and advertising revenue development.
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BUSINESS
December 10, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Godfrey is fed up with those subscription cards that come tumbling out of magazines. Why do publishers bother using them? The publishing industry calls these things "blow-in" cards, and they've been around for years as a way to attract new subscribers. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions In 2009, the New York Times reported that blow-in cards appeared to be falling out of favor as digital distribution grew. But there's not much evidence to back that up. So why does this pesky practice persist?
OPINION
August 22, 2013 | By Charles Duan
Patent trolls are a widely reported problem for big business and technology makers. They are companies that exist primarily to buy up patents and then collect money, in the form of licenses or lawsuit settlements, from alleged infringers of those patents. Trolls take advantage of a patent system with serious flaws, and their abuse of the system is creating, as a White House fact sheet recently put it, a "drain on the American economy. " And, as it turns out, a drain on you, the ordinary consumer.
BUSINESS
February 27, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Any buyer of a new car has faced this question: Should I plunk down extra money for an extended warranty? It can make sense if you'll sleep better at night knowing you have an additional layer of coverage for your wheels. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions But do the statistics bear this out? And do you have to decide right away, when the dealer is pressuring you to come across with more cash? For the answers, check out today's Ask Laz video.
BUSINESS
November 13, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Michael has a credit card he hasn't used in about two years. It has no balance but it does have a $6 monthly fee. Michael's question: If he cancels the card, will it affect his credit score? ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions Generally speaking, creditors get fidgety anytime someone cancels plastic. They suspect that you're carrying beaucoup debt and thus represent a greater risk. So your credit score can go down. Should you worry? And how many credit cards should you have?
BUSINESS
November 26, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Jared wants to know how he can find a certified financial planner who doesn't hit clients for huge commissions but instead wants only a fee for his or her services. First off, big props to you, Jared, for getting your financial house in order. Too many people let things slide instead of making prudent moves to shore up retirement plans or earn the most from their investments. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions It's true that many financial planners want a commission.
BUSINESS
February 14, 2001 | NEDRA PICKLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The government released rollover risk ratings for 30 more vehicles on Tuesday, giving low marks to eight sport-utility vehicles and high grades to four cars. The ratings of the 2001 vehicles are based on a mathematical formula for measuring the vehicle's center of gravity and width. SUVs and pickup trucks are more top-heavy and thus more likely to get lower marks than a car or van.
OPINION
December 3, 2008
Re "U.S. tackles consumer debt market," Nov. 26 OK, I admit that I do not have a degree in economics. However, the information I am reading about "bailouts" defies any logic I know as a consumer. The latest is that the government plans to give billions to industries that will encourage consumer credit. Everyone I know is trying desperately to get out from under credit debt. Can someone who has credit-card debt explain how encouraging the use of further indebtedness through credit can help the average consumer?
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