Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsConsumer
IN THE NEWS

Consumer

BUSINESS
February 14, 2001 | NEDRA PICKLER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
The government released rollover risk ratings for 30 more vehicles on Tuesday, giving low marks to eight sport-utility vehicles and high grades to four cars. The ratings of the 2001 vehicles are based on a mathematical formula for measuring the vehicle's center of gravity and width. SUVs and pickup trucks are more top-heavy and thus more likely to get lower marks than a car or van.
Advertisement
OPINION
December 3, 2008
Re "U.S. tackles consumer debt market," Nov. 26 OK, I admit that I do not have a degree in economics. However, the information I am reading about "bailouts" defies any logic I know as a consumer. The latest is that the government plans to give billions to industries that will encourage consumer credit. Everyone I know is trying desperately to get out from under credit debt. Can someone who has credit-card debt explain how encouraging the use of further indebtedness through credit can help the average consumer?
BUSINESS
June 7, 2009
Re: David Lazarus' consumer column, "Finally, AT&T writes a contract in plain English," May 31: "The 8,000-word contract was a triumph of consumer-unfriendliness" -- and clearly was written by lawyers on steroids! Michael Lohnberg Agoura Hills
BUSINESS
March 21, 2014 | By David Lazarus
Lee is making some changes in his life. He wants to know what happens if he renounces his U.S. citizenship and becomes instead a citizen of the Philippines. Can he keep receiving Social Security checks? An intriguing scenario. Lee doesn't say why he wants to switch teams, but it could have something to do with taxes. A number of Americans jump ship each year because they're displeased with the U.S. tax system. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions In any case, the Social Security Administration does have a status for ex-citizens who may be due monthly checks.
BUSINESS
December 10, 2013 | By David Lazarus
Godfrey is fed up with those subscription cards that come tumbling out of magazines. Why do publishers bother using them? The publishing industry calls these things "blow-in" cards, and they've been around for years as a way to attract new subscribers. ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions In 2009, the New York Times reported that blow-in cards appeared to be falling out of favor as digital distribution grew. But there's not much evidence to back that up. So why does this pesky practice persist?
ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1988
When people attending the Bruce Springsteen concert pay scalpers $350-$850 for a $25 ticket, it is easy to understand why we have inflation. The consumer is being consumed. MONROE RUBINGER Beverly Hills
OPINION
September 15, 1991
In its editorial "Help Wanted From the Fed," Sept. 7), The Times wants the Fed to boost economic activity by cutting interest rates even more and "that should help fuel consumer spending and fire up the recovery." The Times seems to forget that millions of consumers depend on interest income to make ends meet. If their interest income goes lower, how would that fuel consumer spending and fire up the economy? C.B. MIRKIN Los Angeles
NEWS
February 26, 2014
Bill Nagel joined the Los Angeles Times as Executive Vice President, Business Services in July 2009. In this role, Nagel is responsible for growing alternative revenue streams through the marketing and sales of The Times world-class print production, distribution and marketing services to other entities across Southern California. He is also responsible for business to consumer marketing for the Los Angeles Times Media Group's portfolio of products.  Previously, Nagel was Sr. Vice President of Business Channels for the San Diego Union-Tribune, overseeing both consumer and advertising revenue development.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|