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ENTERTAINMENT
May 1, 1988
When people attending the Bruce Springsteen concert pay scalpers $350-$850 for a $25 ticket, it is easy to understand why we have inflation. The consumer is being consumed. MONROE RUBINGER Beverly Hills
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OPINION
September 15, 1991
In its editorial "Help Wanted From the Fed," Sept. 7), The Times wants the Fed to boost economic activity by cutting interest rates even more and "that should help fuel consumer spending and fire up the recovery." The Times seems to forget that millions of consumers depend on interest income to make ends meet. If their interest income goes lower, how would that fuel consumer spending and fire up the economy? C.B. MIRKIN Los Angeles
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 21, 2013 | By Maura Dolan
SAN FRANCISCO -- California retailers may be liable for large money awards if they falsely advertise that their products are on sale. A federal appeals court Tuesday revived a potential class-action lawsuit against Kohl's Department Stores for allegedly misstating in advertising that items had been marked down. The U.S. 9 th Circuit Court of Appeals said California consumer laws permit such lawsuits if the customer would not have made the purchase but for the perceived bargain.
BUSINESS
January 21, 2014 | By David Lazarus
David wants to know if there's a best time to buy cruise tickets. Do you get the best deals if you dive in early and book months in advance, or is it smartest to wait until the last minute and see what's available? ASK LAZ: Smart answers to consumer questions Both approaches have advantages and disadvantages. To find out what the experts say, check out today's Ask Laz video. If you have a consumer question, email me at asklaz@latimes.com or contact me via Twitter @Davidlaz .
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 20, 1988
One would have to be deaf, dumb and blind to be unaware of the insurance industry's multimedia blitz concerning no-fault insurance. This canard must be refuted. Does anyone really believe that the insurance companies, widely known for their philanthropy, are interested in saving consumers' insurance dollars? Nothing could be further from the truth. In other no-fault states, the insurance industry has reaped huge profits from the conversion to no-fault, without lowering rates. The fact is California's insurance laws protect the consumer adequately (although they could do much more)
BUSINESS
August 29, 2002 | Associated Press
Conseco Inc. was dealt another blow when a court upheld an arbitrator's order that it pay nearly $27 million for violations of consumer protection laws by a company Conseco acquired. The South Carolina Supreme Court made the ruling in a case that was argued in March. The case affects 3,739 South Carolina customers with home-improvement or mobile-home loans in the mid-1990s from what was then Green Tree Financial Corp. Conseco bought Green Tree in 1998, two years after the dispute began.
OPINION
March 15, 1992
As a previous insurance salesman, now a self-employed technician in Santa Barbara, I actively turn down all medical insurance coverage. Very little of the premium dollar goes to actual care. Insurance companies lobby for whatever laws would require all people to be on their books. They also have high-commission people working in high-rent buildings, while fraudulent claims go unchecked. Doctors are the least to blame. Hospitals charge $3 for aspirin and must show a bottom-line profit.
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