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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1991
Will's celebration of consumerism in America is more of his usual rubbish. He suggests that "contempt for consumer culture is generally an affectation of comfortable people addicted to the pleasures of condescension." This from a man who wrote the book on condescension! In focusing on the political and moral dimensions of consumerism, Will overlooks a troubling aspect of our consumer culture: the environmental dimension. As Murray Weidenbaum, a member of The Times Board of Economists, noted last year, "Fundamentally, it is the lifestyle of the average citizen that generates the demand for goods and services that give rise to pollution in its various forms."
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OPINION
December 3, 2013
Re "The season of excess begins," Opinion, Nov. 29 I couldn't agree more with Daniel Fink. In this country where we already have so much stuff, after the holidays we end up with even more stuff. This consumerism epidemic has taken on a life of its own, with the bombardment of Black Friday sales and fashion shows and magazines showing what celebrities are buying and endless promotions. That is why I start all my holiday lists with items that I don't want because I know my family will buy me something anyway.
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
For the past three months Lauryn Hill has been behind bars for tax evasion. Hill chose to mark her release on Friday with a new single, “Consumerism.” The coming out track is a blistering jam that has Hill speed-rapping through a heady list of societal woes -- and her targets are wide-ranging. Ageism, sexism, egotism, racism, fascism, McCarthyism and commercialism all get a heavy lashing. Hill's sharp delivery is lightning quick, like her pre-incarceration single “Neurotic Society (Compulsory Mix)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 4, 2013 | By Gerrick D. Kennedy
For the past three months Lauryn Hill has been behind bars for tax evasion. Hill chose to mark her release on Friday with a new single, “Consumerism.” The coming out track is a blistering jam that has Hill speed-rapping through a heady list of societal woes -- and her targets are wide-ranging. Ageism, sexism, egotism, racism, fascism, McCarthyism and commercialism all get a heavy lashing. Hill's sharp delivery is lightning quick, like her pre-incarceration single “Neurotic Society (Compulsory Mix)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 2009 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Stanley Lebergott, 91, a retired economist and professor who maintained that consumerism had brought positive changes to the American standard of living, died July 24 of cardiac arrest at his home in Middletown, Conn. Lebergott, a former government economist and Wesleyan University professor, took issue with those who disdained "consumerism" as wasteful, pointless, even immoral. Consumption, he maintained, has always been an expression of human longing rather than mere acquisitiveness.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Each year, Andy Ruben bought his daughter new shinguards for soccer, stashing the old gear and waiting for the replacements to labor through the delivery system to his door. But as he watched local girls outgrow their own sports equipment, Ruben realized that the items he wanted were gathering dust in garages and closets around his neighborhood. "Our whole retail model over the last 50 years has focused on keeping the industrial machine churning out items," said Ruben, who until 2007 had an up-close view as the head of sustainability at Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the king of mass-produced goods.
TRAVEL
January 27, 2008 | By Susan Spano, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Dubai, United Arab Emirates Consumerism is sometimes seen as a psychological disorder that makes sufferers compulsively buy things they don't need. But I'm not sick. I really needed the 18-karat-gold earrings and little black cocktail dress I bought here last week just as the Dubai Shopping Festival was getting underway. How could I pass them up, when shopping in this great, big bazaar, or souk, of a city for the 21st century is tax-free and, more than that, encouraged?
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
A down-at-the-heels poet is drawn into the gold rush of post-Soviet capitalism, with outrageous results, in the frequently hallucinatory "Generation P. " The big-screen adaptation of Victor Pelevin's 1999 cult novel was a hit in Russia, and though its satiric observations about consumerism and mass media are hardly earth-shattering for American audiences, the movie contains enough fresh insanity and inventive visuals to make it an amusing cyberpunk...
WORLD
June 5, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Chau Linh Uyen was playing in front of her primary school in Ho Chi Minh City two months ago when she touched a cash machine a few feet from the front gate. In a flash, as more than 100 volts coursed through her small body, the 10-year-old fourth-grader foamed at the mouth and , lost consciousness. She died within minutes. The accident, caused by a state bank's ATM that wasn't properly grounded, was hardly a fluke. An investigation a few days later found that 121 of the city's 866 cash machines were leaking electricity through their keyboards and other surfaces, many at potentially fatal levels.
OPINION
December 3, 2013
Re "The season of excess begins," Opinion, Nov. 29 I couldn't agree more with Daniel Fink. In this country where we already have so much stuff, after the holidays we end up with even more stuff. This consumerism epidemic has taken on a life of its own, with the bombardment of Black Friday sales and fashion shows and magazines showing what celebrities are buying and endless promotions. That is why I start all my holiday lists with items that I don't want because I know my family will buy me something anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 2013 | By Julie Makinen, Los Angeles Times
BEIJING -- Forget Zach Snyder's "Man of Steel" or Keanu Reeves' "Man of Tai Chi. " China's movie of the summer is a chick flick that has touched off a mini-culture war while raking in the renminbi -- and a sequel is just weeks away. "Tiny Times" tells the story of four fashionable college girls in Shanghai and is perhaps best described as "The Devil Wears Prada" meets "Sex and the City" (minus the sex) with a dash of "The Bling Ring. " The movie is based on a trio of popular young adult novels by Guo Jingming, a waifish 30-year-old celebrity author/entrepreneur who also directed the film.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Each year, Andy Ruben bought his daughter new shinguards for soccer, stashing the old gear and waiting for the replacements to labor through the delivery system to his door. But as he watched local girls outgrow their own sports equipment, Ruben realized that the items he wanted were gathering dust in garages and closets around his neighborhood. "Our whole retail model over the last 50 years has focused on keeping the industrial machine churning out items," said Ruben, who until 2007 had an up-close view as the head of sustainability at Wal-Mart Stores Inc., the king of mass-produced goods.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 15, 2012 | By Sheri Linden
A down-at-the-heels poet is drawn into the gold rush of post-Soviet capitalism, with outrageous results, in the frequently hallucinatory "Generation P. " The big-screen adaptation of Victor Pelevin's 1999 cult novel was a hit in Russia, and though its satiric observations about consumerism and mass media are hardly earth-shattering for American audiences, the movie contains enough fresh insanity and inventive visuals to make it an amusing cyberpunk...
BUSINESS
September 8, 2012 | By Lisa Zamosky, Special to the Los Angeles Times
The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act is changing the way insurers do business. A few years from now, you may see your health plan in a different light. You might even decide you like it - even if it's not that much more affordable. But it's not all good news: Future employers are also expected to shift more costs to employees, and consumers will generally take on more of their healthcare expenses. "A greater role in cost sharing is really forcing consumers to take a hard look at the care they access," said Robin Gelburd, president of Fair Health, a New York City nonprofit that provides healthcare cost information.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 31, 2012 | By Holly Myers
Edmund Burke, the 18th century philosopher best known in an art context for his writings on the sublime, is not a name that generally comes to mind when thinking about Home Depot. Cleveland-based painter Michelle Muldrow draws a plausible connection, however, in her second solo show at Koplin Del Rio, transposing the tenets of western landscape painting - a tradition heavily influenced by Burke's concept of the sublime as that aspect of nature that inspires terror and awe - to the banal terrain of the big-box store.
OPINION
October 27, 2010 | By Gregory Paul
In their new book, "American Grace," Robert D. Putman and David E. Campbell make two assertions about the decline of religious affiliation in the United States, which they summarize in their Oct. 17 Times Op-Ed article, "Walking away from the church. " They correctly observe that Americans, especially the youngest generations, are rapidly losing a lot of their faith. The nonreligious are far and away the fastest-growing group, with nonbelievers having tripled as a portion of the general population since the 1960s and nonreligious twentysomethings doubling in just two decades.
OPINION
October 24, 2010 | By Robert D. Kaplan
Islam has been an American obsession for at least a decade. The 9/11 attacks and the intractable violence in Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan ? however much we have been the cause of it ? have left us bewildered and terrified by this seemingly austere and martial faith. Islam was spread quickly by the sword from Arabia westward across North Africa, the history books tell us, and is supposedly prone to the extremities of thought to which deserts give rise. But there is a whole other side to Islamic history that has been obscured, even as it illuminates a key strategic geography of the 21st century.
WORLD
June 5, 2010 | By Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
Chau Linh Uyen was playing in front of her primary school in Ho Chi Minh City two months ago when she touched a cash machine a few feet from the front gate. In a flash, as more than 100 volts coursed through her small body, the 10-year-old fourth-grader foamed at the mouth and , lost consciousness. She died within minutes. The accident, caused by a state bank's ATM that wasn't properly grounded, was hardly a fluke. An investigation a few days later found that 121 of the city's 866 cash machines were leaking electricity through their keyboards and other surfaces, many at potentially fatal levels.
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