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Consumers Suits

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1994 | SUSAN MARQUEZ OWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 22-year-old woman has sued the Pepsi Cola Co. and a grocery store chain, alleging that a can of Pepsi she bought contained a decaying rat. Maria Del Consuelo Lazaro's lawsuit filed Friday in Orange County Superior Court claims that, while visiting family in Buena Park in July, she took a drink of Diet Pepsi that she had bought at an Albertson's only to spit out some strange matter.
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BUSINESS
November 10, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
In a dispute between a California couple and AT&T Mobility, the firm argues to keep its arbitration clause. The court's ruling could determine whether disgruntled customers can file a class-action lawsuit rather than be forced to arbitrate out of court. In a dispute between a California couple and AT&T Mobility, the firm argues to keep its arbitration clause. The court's ruling could determine whether disgruntled customers can file a class-action lawsuit rather than be forced to arbitrate out of court.
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NEWS
December 4, 1992 | From Associated Press
A consumer group filed suit Thursday in an effort to nullify last week's U.S. Senate runoff in Georgia and have incumbent Wyche Fowler Jr. declared the winner. Public Citizen contends that the Georgia law requiring a general election runoff when no candidate wins a majority violates the U.S. Constitution and federal law. It said the law adds a requirement for election to the Senate that was not imposed by Congress.
BUSINESS
November 30, 2007 | John Spano, Times Staff Writer
What could unite such fierce competitors as Bristol Farms, Costco, Safeway, Albertsons, Whole Foods Market and Trader Joe's? A group of fish-eating consumers who want to know whether the salmon in the stores' display cases is wild or farmed. The grocery giants have formed an unlikely alliance to fight a legal bid by 11 consumers who contend California markets have failed to clearly distinguish salmon caught in the wild from its farm-raised cousin, which contains red dye to appear more palatable.
BUSINESS
January 25, 1994
TRW Inc. said Monday that a Wyoming federal judge has set aside a $290,000 judgment and dismissed a lawsuit brought by a consumer who had alleged that errors in his TRW credit report led to rejection of his application for a car loan. The case was dismissed by U.S. District Judge Clarence A. Brimmer last month after TRW discovered new evidence that showed that Paul K. Jacques' credit report was accurate, and not inaccurate as he had claimed.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 21, 1993 | GREG HERNANDEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Mark Lautherboren bought a new Chevrolet pickup from a Westminster dealership in 1988, he said he thought he was buying the truck of his dreams. But what he got was a lemon. As soon as he got it home, Lautherboren said, he noticed paint blisters and bubbles, scratches, pockmarks, runs and drips, along with fire damage in the engine compartment and torn and deformed seats and door panels.
BUSINESS
May 5, 1993 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was Halloween night in 1988 when Mark Lautherboren of Westminster plopped down $10,000 in cash for a new blue Chevy pickup. The next morning, when the Rockwell electronics assembler could see better, he discovered that his truck had paint blisters, bubbles, scratches, torn seats and fire damage in the engine compartment. That's when Lautherboren began his odyssey with General Motors Corp. and one of its dealerships--which he alleged in court repeatedly failed to repair the truck.
BUSINESS
August 3, 1993 | JAMES M. GOMEZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A jury of 10 women and four men was selected Monday to decide whether Shiley Inc. deliberately hid the defects in a controversial artificial heart valve it manufactured that has been linked to the deaths of 300 people. Attorneys for Ruth Barillas, a San Diego resident who received a Bjork-Shiley heart valve more than 10 years ago, will try to persuade the Orange County Superior Court jury that Barillas was the victim of fraud by Shiley and its parent, Pfizer Corp. of New York.
BUSINESS
August 5, 1993 | DEBORA VRANA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Lawyers for the Irvine manufacturer of a potentially defective heart valve argued Wednesday that a doctor who implanted one such valve was informed by the company of problems with the device, despite his testimony the day before that he was not told. During the second day of arguments in the first of six cases against Shiley Inc.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 20, 1989
Mervyn's Department Stores of Hayward has settled a consumer protection lawsuit filed by Orange County prosecutors, a deputy district attorney said Thursday. The suit, filed in Orange County Superior Court, alleged that all 98 Mervyn's stores in the state had advertised greater discounts for large-quantity purchases during a "Buy More, Save More" sale from April 17 to 23 but had programmed their computerized checkout systems to apply lower discounts no matter how many items were purchased.
BUSINESS
May 6, 2004 | E. Scott Reckard
The Federal Trade Commission unsealed a lawsuit alleging that National Consumer Council Inc. in Santa Ana and a complex web of affiliates bilked millions of dollars from debt-burdened consumers with deceptive promises to negotiate discounted settlements of their accounts. Saying National Credit was "masquerading as a nonprofit," the FTC also alleged that the companies routinely called consumers who had placed their names on the national do-not-call registry.
BUSINESS
May 20, 2003 | Henry Weinstein, Times Staff Writer
A federal appeals court in San Francisco on Monday narrowly reaffirmed a decision that Suzuki Motor Corp. is entitled to a jury trial on its claim that Consumer Reports magazine rigged a test to show that the Suzuki Samurai sport utility vehicle "rolls over too easily." Consumers Union, the parent organization of Consumer Reports, failed by a 12-11 vote on the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals in its bid to get a rehearing. Judge A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 15, 2001 | STUART PFEIFER and RICHARD MAROSI, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Attorneys have filed a class-action lawsuit against one of Orange County's largest apartment building owners, charging that the company unfairly retained security deposits for unnecessary cleanups and repairs. The Orange County district attorney's office has been investigating the claims against Arnel Management Co. for several months and has concluded that potentially thousands of tenants could be due refunds.
NEWS
March 8, 1998 | MICHAEL G. WAGNER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It's almost impossible these days to open a checking account, get automobile insurance, buy stock, obtain health care or even take an ocean cruise without being asked--or compelled--to surrender one of America's most basic constitutional rights. Through tiny paragraphs of legalese that many people never see or read, Americans are forfeiting their rights to a day in court if they believe that some provider has done them wrong.
BUSINESS
December 11, 1997 | RUSS STANTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The parent of Micro Center agreed to pay up to $6.6 million to about 120,000 Southern California consumers to settle a class-action lawsuit that charged the Ohio-based electronics retailer with illegally asking for--and recording--personal information from customers who made credit-card purchases at its Tustin store. Most of the payments, ranging from $10 to $50 per customer, will consist of discounts on merchandise, service and repair contracts and training classes at the Tustin store.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1996 | EDWIN CHEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a major concession, House Republicans on Wednesday abandoned a central element of their "contract with America," forsaking a broad legal reform bill for a much narrower Senate measure that would restrict consumer lawsuits over defective products. Consumer groups responded by denouncing the compromise, arguing that it would restrict consumer access to the courthouse and, by limiting punitive damages, would remove deterrents to irresponsible corporate behavior.
NEWS
July 15, 1986 | KIM MURPHY, Times Staff Writer
A catalogue company offering 90% rebates on merchandise and membership bonuses of up to $580,000 a year became the target of a $1-million consumer protection suit filed Monday that claims the increasingly popular catalogue marketing program is an illegal pyramid operation. Tradevest Inc.
BUSINESS
November 10, 2010 | By David G. Savage, Los Angeles Times
In a dispute between a California couple and AT&T Mobility, the firm argues to keep its arbitration clause. The court's ruling could determine whether disgruntled customers can file a class-action lawsuit rather than be forced to arbitrate out of court. In a dispute between a California couple and AT&T Mobility, the firm argues to keep its arbitration clause. The court's ruling could determine whether disgruntled customers can file a class-action lawsuit rather than be forced to arbitrate out of court.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1994 | SUSAN MARQUEZ OWEN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A 22-year-old woman has sued the Pepsi Cola Co. and a grocery store chain, alleging that a can of Pepsi she bought contained a decaying rat. Maria Del Consuelo Lazaro's lawsuit filed Friday in Orange County Superior Court claims that, while visiting family in Buena Park in July, she took a drink of Diet Pepsi that she had bought at an Albertson's only to spit out some strange matter.
NEWS
April 5, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In a new setback for states trying to stem the flow of trash across their borders, the Supreme Court ruled Monday that government officials may not charge higher fees for dumping out-of-state garbage in their landfills. The 7-2 decision strikes down an Oregon law that set a $3.10 per ton disposal fee for out-of-state solid waste and an 85-cent fee for waste generated in Oregon.
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