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BUSINESS
March 4, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
The White House said Monday that consumers should be able to unlock their smartphones, and that it would support legislation to make such adjustments legal. The Obama administration said consumers deserve the flexibility to unlock their smartphones as well as their tablets, allowing consumers to use a device with a carrier other than the one they bought it from. "It's common sense, crucial for protecting consumer choice, and important for ensuring we continue to have the vibrant, competitive wireless market that delivers innovative products and solid service to meet consumers' needs," the White House said in response to a petition.
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OPINION
February 2, 2002
"Cell Phone Numbers Racket" (editorial, Jan. 17) is well-intentioned but misinformed. As attractive an idea as taking your number with you when you switch wireless providers may be, it will redirect almost $1 billion in its first year and half-a-billion dollars every year thereafter away from consumers' No. 1 concern: continuing to expand coverage and quality. This is a matter of choice. Should the industry spend billions on continuing to fight blocked calls and dropped calls, or should that money be spent on rebuilding the infrastructure for something that will be of value only to a few?
BUSINESS
September 14, 2009 | Associated Press
Wall Street wants consumers to do their part to heal the economy. Traders know it's going to take some time. Investors will get some insight this week into how much consumers are spending from a government report on August retail sales. They will also get an indicator of how willing consumers are to borrow money to make those purchases when credit card lender Discover Financial Services reports earnings Thursday. "I think everybody is focusing so heavily on if people are releasing some of those dollars they have been clinging so tightly to over the past year," said Jamie Cox, managing partner at Harris Financial Group in Colonial Heights, Va. Analysts say investors need to see evidence that consumer spending is picking up before the market can extend its recent gains.
NEWS
October 24, 2012 | By Karin Klein
Discussions of Proposition 37, the initiative that would require labeling of many genetically engineered foods, tend to bring up two arguments that both seem true at first blush. Opponents claim it would raise the price of food; supporters say it would result in better-informed consumers. But both assertions are more dubious than they appear. The No-on-37 campaign bases most of its claims of higher food prices on a study that it paid for, so obviously the findings are hardly unimpeachable.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2014 | By Ricardo Lopez
General Mills Inc., maker of Cheerios and other grocery staples, has reversed a recent change to its online legal policy after an outcry by consumers. The policy had been quietly updated last week to include terms under which any dispute with the company would have to be decided through arbitration, a change first reported by the New York Times last week. Critics and legal experts said the new terms could cost consumers their right to sue in court if they merely "liked" General Mills' social media pages, downloaded coupons from its website or entered any company-sponsored contests.
BUSINESS
July 30, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Consumer confidence dropped this month from a more than five-year high, but still remains well above levels of a year ago, the Conference Board said Tuesday. The group's index decreased to 80.3 in July from an upwardly revised 82.1 in June. Analysts surveyed by Bloomberg News had expected the figure to decline to 81.3. The drop was caused by lower expectations of economic and job conditions over the next six months, said Lynn Franco, director of economic indicators at the Conference Board.
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