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BUSINESS
August 7, 2013 | By Ricardo Lopez
A new report by Oceana, an environmental advocacy group, found that seafood mislabeling can lead consumers to pay up to twice as much for certain fish, the group said Wednesday. The economic impact study comes six months after Ocean first reported that about one-third of seafood sold in the U.S. is mislabeled. That two-year study of 1,200 seafood samples found that 33% were mislabeled according to U.S Food and Drug Administration guidelines. QUIZ: How well do you know fast food?
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BUSINESS
October 16, 2012 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- Consumers did a better job making on-time payments for mortgages and credit cards last month than at any point since the end of the Great Recession. A leading index of defaults on consumer loans fell in September for the ninth straight month, hitting its lowest level since 2009. Defaults in four of the five loan categories tracked by the S&P Dow Jones Indices and credit reporting company Experian also dropped to their lowest level 2009, the companies said Tuesday.
NEWS
August 8, 2012 | By Betty Hallock
COFFEE COSTS The average monthly price for a pound of coffee fell 24% in July from a year earlier. But the price drop won't trickle down to customers until next year. [U.S. News] SPLASH LAB Watch an IBC root beer bottle shatter to bits through the power of tiny bubbles in a video produced by the Brigham Young University Splash Lab. [Bon Appetit] OVEN TEMP FALLACIES Think your oven is at 350 degrees when you set the dial to 350? Nope. It's anywhere between 330 and 370 degrees -- by design -- and that's if it's well calibrated.
BUSINESS
November 23, 2012 | By Walter Hamilton and Ricardo Lopez, Los Angeles Times
As you pack into the mall today with hordes of other Black Friday shoppers, think of it as an act of economic patriotism. With your shopping bags full of holiday gifts, you'll once again be playing a central role in the U.S. economy. After retrenching in the early days of the recovery, consumers are reasserting themselves as the key driver of U.S. economic growth. And that's coming at an opportune time, given that other economic propellants such as manufacturing and exports have slowed.
BUSINESS
December 17, 2010 | By Sandra M. Jones
Early this fall, James Reinhart noticed something odd happening at ThredUp, the children's clothing swap site the Harvard Business School graduate and his buddies dreamed up a year ago. Swappers started using the online exchange to trade toys. As the volume of toy trading increased, ThredUp decided there was enough demand to expand its service. The San Francisco start-up officially launched its toy exchange site Dec. 6, just as holiday shopping shifted into full gear. The turn of events at ThredUp signals how dramatically shopping is changing in the wake of the Great Recession.
BUSINESS
July 2, 2013 | By Andrea Chang
Consumers often turn to the Internet to research a product before buying. Fake reviews are always a concern, and the problem may be bigger than previously thought. There have long been reports and rumors of businesses posting negative reviews of their competitors' products or companies that pay or reward users to write glowing reviews (known as cyber-shilling). But new research shows that loyal customers are writing extremely negative reviews about products they never purchased.
BUSINESS
February 11, 2013 | By Jim Puzzanghera
WASHINGTON -- About one in 20 consumers had significant errors on their credit reports that could cause them to pay more for auto loans and other financial products, according to a Federal Trade Commission report released Monday. The study also found that about 26% of the approximately 200 million people covered by the U.S. credit reporting industry had at least one "potentially material error" on one of their three credit reports. And four out of five people who took steps to fix errors with one of the three major credit reporting companies -- Experian Information Solutions Inc., Equifax Inc. and TransUnion -- got their credit report changed.
BUSINESS
December 19, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
Trinkel De La Paz, 24, loves this holiday's deep discounts because they're enabling her to be a more generous Santa. To herself, that is. The Silver Lake graphic designer bought herself an iPad mini and some clothes discounted on Cyber Monday, and she's not done. De La Paz said she feels free to splurge on herself because she has extra money from a recently landed job, a new apartment waiting to be spruced up and only one present to buy for her family's Secret Santa exchange.
BUSINESS
March 20, 2013 | By Salvador Rodriguez
A new poll says 46% of consumers surveyed would not spend more than $500 for Google's smartphone-like eyewear -- early versions of which the company is selling for $1,500. Nearly a quarter said they would not spend more than $1,000 for the glasses. Only 6% of respondents said they would spend whatever it takes to buy the device. Despite consumers reluctance to spend $1,500 for the glasses, interest in the product is fairly strong, according to the survey, which found that 61% of respondents would buy it if it was priced right.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 1, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
A report on "60 Minutes" has resulted in a new California law giving consumers the ability to make sure their credit reports are accurate. Assemblywoman Nancy Skinner (D-Berkeley) said she was watching the CBS program and was struck by the results of a study by the Federal Trade Commission that as many as 40 million Americans have inaccurate information and errors in their credit reports. “As consumers, we deserve every right to view our credit histories, especially if a bank, landlord or employer has this information and can use it to deny our credit applications,” Skinner said.
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