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BUSINESS
January 16, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google is searching for a better way for millions of diabetics to manage their disease by developing a contact lens that monitors glucose levels in tears. The contact lenses are the latest project from Google's secretive X lab that also came up with the driverless car, the Internet-connected eyewear Glass, and Project Loon, which is using balloons to bring the Internet to far-flung places. The "smart" contact lens uses a tiny wireless chip and miniature glucose sensor that is folded into two layers of soft contact lens material.
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SPORTS
March 30, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
Mike Trout could have another monster season. Albert Pujols and Josh Hamilton could bounce back from career-worst years. Joe Smith and Sean Burnett could add much-needed depth and reliability to the bullpen. And it might not matter. For the Angels to end their four-year playoff drought, they will need six months of consistently strong pitching from a rotation that has little margin for error or injury. The projected starters should be better than the 2013 group, though inexperience at the back of the rotation is a cause for concern.
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NEWS
July 14, 2010 | Jessie Schiewe, Los Angeles Times
Call her super-talented or super-insane, there's no denying that Lady Gaga has a magnetic effect on young girls, inspiring thousands of young fans to don blond wigs, sheer lace leggings, yellow caution tape and even sunglasses made out of cigarettes. But, the latest Gaga trend — circle lenses, has got not only fashion critics worried, but eye doctors as well. Circle lenses were available before the Gaga explosion, and in fact their popularity originated in Japan, Singapore and South Korea where many young women wear them to accentuate their eyes to resemble Japanese anime characters.
SPORTS
March 16, 2014 | By Bill Shaikin
TEMPE, Ariz. - Chris Iannetta looked over to the dugout for the sign. The Angels catcher could see a hand with wiggling fingers, but he struggled to count the number of fingers. "I couldn't tell between two and three," he said. That is worrisome enough for anyone and quite the occupational hazard when your job involves catching and hitting baseballs at speeds approaching 100 mph. Iannetta struggled last summer to keep his batting average above the Mendoza Line. "I felt out of shape," he said.
NATIONAL
October 22, 2002 | From Times Wire Reports
U.S. health officials warned Americans not to wear colored contact lenses being sold simply for decoration and without a prescription or a professional fitting, saying the lenses present serious risks of permanent eye injury. The Food and Drug Administration said noncorrective, decorative contact lenses are being sold directly to consumers at flea markets, convenience stores and beach shops, adding that marketing may increase around Halloween.
NATIONAL
October 29, 2004 | From Times Wire Reports
Federal health officials are warning people not to use decorative contact lenses as part of Halloween costumes. Decorative lenses sold without a prescription are illegal and can cause serious eye injury and even blindness, the Food and Drug Administration said, citing injury reports it has received. The lenses, which come in various colors and designs, have been widely sold without prescription, the agency said.
BUSINESS
June 8, 1990 | United Press International
PPG Industries said its Chemicals Group will form a joint venture with a French firm to manufacture and market special contact lenses, forming a new company that will be headquartered in St. Petersburg, Fla. PPG and Essilor International of France have reached an agreement in principle to make ophthalmic-quality lenses for consumer eye wear. PPG would hold 51% of the new company, officials said. The deal is subject to approval by boards of directors of both companies.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1988 | From Times staff and wire reports
Emory University researchers have fitted monkeys with contact lenses in a study that they hope will yield new ways to treat babies born with cataracts and other vision disabilities. The study at Atlanta's Yerkes Regional Primate Research Center involves a pediatric ophthalmologist, a primate behavioral psychologist, neuroscientists and several dozen monkeys.
NEWS
June 1, 1989 | MARLENE CIMONS, Times Staff Writer
The Food and Drug Administration recommended Wednesday that consumers who use extended-wear contact lenses or disposable lenses keep them in their eyes no longer than seven days at a time, warning that the currently approved wearing time of 30 days poses "too high" a risk of developing corneal lesions that can lead to blindness. The federal agency urged all manufacturers of extended-wear lenses--which are worn by an estimated 5 million Americans--to voluntarily relabel their products to reflect the recommendation.
SPORTS
May 3, 2011 | By Jim Peltz
Jay Gibbons was beginning to wonder whether his eyes would ever allow him to play in the major leagues again. "It definitely crept through my mind more than once that this was not going to get better," Gibbons said Tuesday after being reinstated with the Dodgers. He replaced Marcus Thames , who was put on the 15-day disabled list because of a right quadriceps strain. Starting in spring training, Gibbons struggled to find the correct contact lenses, especially in his right eye, leaving him unable to handle big league pitching and to break camp with the Dodgers.
BUSINESS
January 16, 2014 | By Jessica Guynn
SAN FRANCISCO -- Google is searching for a better way for millions of diabetics to manage their disease by developing a contact lens that monitors glucose levels in tears. The contact lenses are the latest project from Google's secretive X lab that also came up with the driverless car, the Internet-connected eyewear Glass, and Project Loon, which is using balloons to bring the Internet to far-flung places. The "smart" contact lens uses a tiny wireless chip and miniature glucose sensor that is folded into two layers of soft contact lens material.
SPORTS
June 23, 2013 | By Bill Shaikin
SAN DIEGO - The hamstring injury that put Matt Kemp on the disabled list appears healed. The poor hitting that preceded the stint on the disabled list? The Dodgers are keeping their fingers crossed. Kemp went hitless in five at-bats - with four strikeouts - in his first rehabilitation game with triple-A Albuquerque on Saturday. In 51 games with the Dodgers, Kemp is batting .251 with two home runs and 60 strikeouts - a total that still leads the team even though he has not played in the major leagues since May 29. Dodgers Manager Don Mattingly said Kemp had tried a new pair of contact lenses in Saturday's game, which might have contributed to the strikeouts.
SPORTS
March 5, 2013 | By Chris Foster
UCLA AT WASHINGTON STATE When: 6:30 p.m. Where: Beasley Coliseum, Pullman, Wash. On the air: TV: Pac-12 Networks; Radio: 570. Records: UCLA 22-7 overall, 12-4 Pac-12; Washington State 11-18, 2-14. Update: UCLA forward Travis Wear (strained right foot) did not practice Monday after playing only 17 minutes against Arizona on Saturday. He missed the two previous games because of the injury. "He had some swelling after the game, which we expected," Coach Ben Howland said.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2013 | By Jenny Deam and Michael Muskal
CENTENNIAL, Colo. - The preliminary hearing for James E. Holmes ended Wednesday after two days of graphic testimony showing the brutality of the attack, but without offering any motive for the mass shooting inside a suburban movie theater. Judge William B. Sylvester decided not to rule immediately on whether Holmes will stand trail. The purpose of a preliminary hearing is to determine whether there is probable cause to take the case to trial. Sylvester set Friday morning for a return date and possible arraignment in the case.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 4, 2012 | Ed Stockly
Click here to download TV listings for the week Dec. 2 - 8 in PDF format This week's TV Movies     CBS This Morning CEO Mark Pincus, Zynga. (N) 7 a.m. KCBS Today Elijah Wood; Paula Deen. (N) 7 a.m. KNBC Good Morning America Mia Hamm; Gerard Butler; Tyler Florence; Lori Bergamotto. (N) 7 a.m. KABC Live With Kelly and Michael Elijah Wood; Kelly auditions for the ballet; Katherine Jenkins performs. (N) 9 a.m. KABC The View Guest co-host Jenny McCarthy; Jane Seymour; Bonnie Raitt.
SPORTS
November 16, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
He should have saved this for "talk like a pirate" day, but Greg Monroe of the Detroit Pistons looked like a pirate as he was shooting a free throw Wednesday night. While driving to the hoop, Monroe was poked in the eye by Philadelphia's Spencer Hawes, drawing a foul. Unfortunately for Monroe, the poke knocked out one of his contact lenses, without which he has the eyesight of Mr. Magoo. Monroe couldn't find the lens, so he had to shoot his first free throw while basically being blind in one eye. Solution: Close the eye. He made the free throw.
BUSINESS
October 26, 2001 | Bloomberg News
A New Jersey Superior Court judge Thursday approved Johnson & Johnson's $860-million settlement of lawsuits accusing the drug maker of misleading consumers into prematurely throwing away disposable 1-Day Acuvue contact lenses. Judge John Fratto found that the settlement is a "fair and reasonable" resolution of lawsuits by consumers, who said they were deceived into thinking they could use the lenses only a single time.
HEALTH
November 28, 2011 | By Chris Woolston, Special to the Los Angeles Times
We rarely stop to think about it, but reading is an amazing accomplishment. It turns markings on a page or a screen into coherent thoughts. It's a complicated process: The eyes see a procession of letters, and the brain turns them into words. The reading process is challenging for people with dyslexia. The disorder isn't well understood, but there seems to be a communication breakdown between the eyes and the brain. Some people with dyslexia have trouble associating letters with sounds and words.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2012 | By David Pierson, Los Angeles Times
GUANGZHOU - The children at the Bayi Xiwang elementary and middle school are doing something revolutionary by current Chinese standards: They're playing outside. Singing and skipping in the dizzying southern Chinese humidity, these students have been given 45 minutes a day to frolic under the sun while peers across the nation remain indoors, hunched over books or squinting at blackboards. By forcing youngsters to put down their pencils and expose their eyes to natural light, researchers think they can stem an explosion of nearsightedness in China.
NATIONAL
May 25, 2012 | By Rene Stutzman and Jeff Weiner
ORLANDO, Fla. - Evidence released last week in the second-degree murder case against George Zimmerman shows four key witnesses made major changes in what they say they saw and heard on the rainy February night when he fatally shot 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Three changed their stories in ways that could damage Zimmerman. One man who initially told police Martin was atop Zimmerman punching him "MMA-style" - a reference to Mixed Marital Arts - later said he was no longer sure about the punches.
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