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BUSINESS
November 2, 1987 | Associated Press
Reynolds Metals Co. executives say the resealable aluminum Reylock can the company will introduce today will be the biggest entry in the highly competitive container field since the pop-top. "The Reylock can represents the first totally recyclable large beverage container over 12 ounces specifically designed for the soft-drink market," said Robert D. O'Donnell, can division chief.
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BUSINESS
March 3, 1989 | GEORGE WHITE, Times Staff Writer
Faced with sluggish sales and rising public concerns about cholesterol, Olson Industries in Sherman Oaks sold its egg-production division in 1987 to concentrate on the production of plastic containers--an industry that had been experiencing skyrocketing sales. But since the switch, the firm has been losing money, partly because the sky itself has become a limit.
BUSINESS
May 29, 2007 | From the Associated Press
With earthshaking thuds, a stamping machine hammers a sheet of hot plastic into king-size drinking cups destined to quench thirsts for soda at the nation's convenience stores. The blank white cups aren't just flexible and resistant to splitting -- they're also made from less plastic than cups produced by Berry Plastics Corp.'s competitors through a manufacturing process the company guards so closely that it forbids photographs of those machines. As retailers such as Wal-Mart Stores Inc.
NEWS
July 20, 2000 | CANDACE A. WEDLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Left your toothbrush at home and worried about insulting your client with coffee breath? Not to worry. It's almost certain someone in the office will come to your rescue. Not with a toothbrush, though. With a mint. And not just any mint--a strong, expensive one in a beautifully designed tin. The trend for mints in portable tins seemed to start around 1995 with an ad campaign for Altoids, "The Original Celebrated Curiously Strong Peppermints" in the distinctive red and white tins.
BUSINESS
August 24, 1987 | Associated Press
A California-based soda maker hopes consumers will get a kick out of its new see-through, plastic cans and expand its share of the $40-billion soft drink industry. Original New York Seltzer Co., which traces it roots to the streets of Brooklyn but is now based in Walnut, Calif., is testing 12-ounce plastic cans this summer in the Detroit area.
BUSINESS
June 7, 1988 | KEITH BRADSHER, Times Staff Writer
Southern California's biggest export by volume is not oranges, movies or missiles. It's empty space. But that's changing, and shipping companies say it is about time. Close to half the containers that passed through the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach last year left empty. But the fall in the U.S.
BUSINESS
August 14, 2007 | Alana Semuels, Times Staff Writer
Plastic water bottles have been getting such a bad rap that people have started paying attention, which means that corporate America has started cashing in. The company that makes Brita water filters teamed up Monday with Nalgene, a manufacturer of reusable beverage containers, to launch the FilterForGood campaign, aimed at weaning people off throwaway bottles.
NEWS
December 29, 1999 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you haul your body off the stair climber come New Year's Day, don't toss out the Gatorade bottle. Under a new law, it will be worth 2.5 cents at your local recycling center. But that empty magnum of Moet on the coffee table? Sorry; that one won't reap you a payback. Launched in 1987, California's bottle and can recycling program expands beginning Saturday, placing a fresh assortment of beverages under the state's deposit and refund rules.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
Gerber is changing the packaging of some of its baby food. Gone are the single-serving glass jars used since the 1940s to package applesauce, bananas and pears. Now those three products will come in cube-shaped plastic containers, Gerber Products Co. officials were to announce today. The new containers will come in four-packs and have plastic lids that snap on and off with a foil seal to prevent tampering.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1991 | ROBERT BURNS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In early February, a coalition of consumer-products makers and packagers came out with their own guidelines for "green" marketing: the use of terms such as biodegradeable and recycled material on package labels. It was the latest effort by industry to appear more environmentally friendly. At the forefront of the green issue is packaging: By some estimates, a third of what goes into landfills is packaging.
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