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BUSINESS
June 7, 1988 | KEITH BRADSHER, Times Staff Writer
Southern California's biggest export by volume is not oranges, movies or missiles. It's empty space. But that's changing, and shipping companies say it is about time. Close to half the containers that passed through the ports of Los Angeles and Long Beach last year left empty. But the fall in the U.S.
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NEWS
December 29, 1999 | JENIFER WARREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When you haul your body off the stair climber come New Year's Day, don't toss out the Gatorade bottle. Under a new law, it will be worth 2.5 cents at your local recycling center. But that empty magnum of Moet on the coffee table? Sorry; that one won't reap you a payback. Launched in 1987, California's bottle and can recycling program expands beginning Saturday, placing a fresh assortment of beverages under the state's deposit and refund rules.
BUSINESS
June 19, 2001 | From Associated Press
Gerber is changing the packaging of some of its baby food. Gone are the single-serving glass jars used since the 1940s to package applesauce, bananas and pears. Now those three products will come in cube-shaped plastic containers, Gerber Products Co. officials were to announce today. The new containers will come in four-packs and have plastic lids that snap on and off with a foil seal to prevent tampering.
BUSINESS
March 4, 1991 | ROBERT BURNS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In early February, a coalition of consumer-products makers and packagers came out with their own guidelines for "green" marketing: the use of terms such as biodegradeable and recycled material on package labels. It was the latest effort by industry to appear more environmentally friendly. At the forefront of the green issue is packaging: By some estimates, a third of what goes into landfills is packaging.
HEALTH
January 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean, Los Angeles Times
With two-thirds of U.S. adults overweight, it's not rocket science to conclude that we don't have a clue about how much to eat. But now there's a countertop gadget that looks a little like a kid's cooking set - perhaps not for nothing - that is meant to help with portion control. It's called Lifesize and was created by Myles Berkowitz, who'd had it with being overweight, and trainer Stephen Kates, who says, "You have to eat less food - that's the whole secret. " "Don't change what you eat; change how much you eat" sums up the idea behind Lifesize, a set of plastic measuring vessels marked for meats, toppings, saucy dishes and other categories of food.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 2, 1988 | DAVID FERRELL, Times Staff Writer
All he wanted to do was to park his long white recycling bins in the parking lots of neighborhood supermarkets. But for John Griffin, Southern California manager for Reynolds Aluminum Recycling, the mandates of the new California recycling law ran head-on into a raft of local zoning restrictions. Some cities wanted him to enclose the bins within block walls; others wanted him to install landscaping. Some asked for architectural plans or traffic studies. A few told him no way.
NEWS
October 14, 1989 | CARL INGRAM, CARL INGRAM, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A top-level law enforcement official disclosed Friday that two feuding state officials have separately asked for investigations of payments made to businesses they suspect of defrauding the California beverage container recycling program. Whitt Murray, acting chief of the Department of Justice's bureau of investigations, said the investigations of suspected fraud by recyclers were requested by state Controller Gray Davis and Director of Conservation Randall M. Ward.
BUSINESS
April 26, 2001 | JERRY HIRSCH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Shares of EarthShell Corp. hit a 52-week high and then plunged by nearly a third Wednesday as investors attempted to sort out how close the Santa Barbara-based company is to seeing its tests of biodegradable fast-food containers turn into major sales contracts. The company's stock price rose to $5.46 before ending the day at $4.38, down 30 cents on Nasdaq, after a company announcement that it would start testing disposable coffee cups made from its limestone and potato starch material.
BUSINESS
June 22, 1997 | From Associated Press
Environmentalists are cool to the concept, but a self-chilling beverage container developed by a California company was crowned "Can of the Year" Friday at an industry trade show. The award by the International Canning Technology Exhibition came a day after Britain urged a ban on the Chill-Can because of fears the refrigerant it uses would contribute to global warming. The Joseph Co., based in Laguna Niguel, spent eight years developing the can, which chills its contents 30 degrees in minutes.
BUSINESS
March 14, 1991 | MICHAEL PARRISH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what many see as a strong sign that California's long-troubled beverage container recycling program is finally working, the state will announce today that recycling rates for bottles and cans have jumped dramatically--particularly for containers made of plastic. The return rate for all materials combined--aluminum, glass, plastic and steel--went from 56% in 1989 to 70% in 1990, according to the state Division of Recycling.
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