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Contraceptives

NEWS
March 28, 2012 | By Karin Klein
In 1957, when the U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved the first birth-control pills, it wasn't for birth control. The contraceptives won approval as a treatment for severe menstrual disorders; temporary infertility was a side effect. Funny, women across the country suddenly started complaining in droves about severe menstrual disorders. As religiously-affiliated organizations, such as Catholic hospitals and universities, continue to complain about federal policies that would require that health insurance cover family planning (President Obama worked out a compromise deal under which the insurance companies would absorb the cost, but the U.S. Conference of Catholic Bishops still sees this as undue interference)
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1993 | Tracey Kaplan
San Fernando High School is believed to be one of only a handful of school-based health clinics in the nation to offer teen-age girls the contraceptive Norplant. What makes Norplant unique is that the system requires no effort on the recipient's part. Six matchstick-sized plastic capsules implanted under the skin of the upper arm release birth-control chemicals into the bloodstream for up to five years. The school gives parents the option of refusing reproductive services for their children.
SCIENCE
December 7, 2012 | By Kenneth R. Weiss
It has been decades since the last major breakthrough of a popular, easy-to-use and effective form of birth control. The pill has been available since 1960 and the IUD since 1965. Condoms have been around for centuries, although today's latex versions are improvements over those fashioned from sheep guts. But some innovative research is underway in Kim Woodrow 's bioengineering lab at the University of Washington.  She and her students have produced electrically spun cloth with nanometer-sized fibers that can quickly dissolve and release drugs to prevent unplanned pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease.
NEWS
February 12, 2012 | By David G. Savage
White House Chief of Staff Jack Lew said Sunday that President Obama had found the “right balance” in mandating birth control coverage while protecting religious liberty, and he said the administration would now press ahead to adopt a final rule requiring health insurers to make contraceptives available to all policyholders at no cost. This is “the right policy” and a “very good resolution” of the dispute that had flared between Catholic leaders and the White House, Lew said in a series of appearances on the Sunday talk shows.  “We didn't expect there would be universal acceptance” of the compromise announced Friday, but a “broad range of groups” had applauded Obama's plan, he said.
NATIONAL
February 12, 2012 | By David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
Senate Minority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-Ky.) vowed Sunday to fight the administration's requirement that insurers provide contraceptive coverage for faith-based employers. McConnell said on CBS' "Face the Nation" that he would press legislation to exempt all employers from providing insurance coverage for contraceptives if they have religious or moral objections. "We'll be voting on that in the Senate, and you can anticipate that would happen as soon as possible.…This issue will not go away until the administration simply backs down," he said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 6, 1990
Your editorial was both moving and important. As you suggest, contraceptives can help to avoid this rapidly increasing problem. But contraception is not, as you state, the only way to deal with the problem. Clearly, the prejudice in so many societies against lesbians and gay men is a means of forcing them to act as if they were heterosexual, and reproduce, or suffer punishment because they do not, ordinarily, have children. The twin goals of population stability and respect for human rights are both violated by insisting that homosexual people act against their own sexual orientation and enter heterosexual relationships.
HEALTH
February 28, 2012 | By Julie Appleby, Special to the Los Angeles Times
While controversy over one aspect of the Obama administration's contraception rule — whether and when religiously affiliated employers must comply — has dominated recent headlines, that debate has obscured other questions about how the rules will actually be implemented. Under the healthcare law, insured women will qualify for contraceptives without a co-payment as part of a range of preventive medical services. But insurers and advocates are frustrated by the lack of details.
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