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NEWS
April 27, 2000 | LIZ PULLIAM WESTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Gordon Elwood of Medford, Ore., kept his pants up with a bungee cord, accepted handouts from a food bank and refused to have a phone installed in his home because of the cost. When he died in October at age 79, he left a $10-million fortune. Elwood was among a small fraternity of America's upper class: the penny-pinching, often shabbily dressed wealthy who are almost as much a mystery to the people who know them as to the millions of strangers who read their stories and wonder, "Why?"
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SPORTS
April 24, 2014 | Helene Elliott
Their big guys played big, the leaders led by fearless example, and the Kings, on the brink of going home for the summer, got the result they so urgently needed, a 6-3 victory over the San Jose Sharks on Thursday at Staples Center that extended their season by at least one more game. "We're alive," said winger Marian Gaborik, who played a huge part in resuscitating them by scoring their first and fifth goals. Justin Williams scored twice in a three-goal spree in the second period, and rookie Tyler Toffoli chipped in with the kind of skillful goal the Kings need from him in the short- and long-term future.
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NATIONAL
April 2, 2008 | Josh Meyer, Times Staff Writer
Saudi Arabia remains the world's leading source of money for Al Qaeda and other extremist networks and has failed to take key steps requested by U.S. officials to stem the flow, the Bush administration's top financial counter-terrorism official said Tuesday. Stuart A.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2014 | By Elaine Woo
When Adrianne Wadewitz became a Wikipedia contributor 10 years ago she decided to use a pseudonym, certain that fellow scholars at Indiana University would frown on writing for the often-maligned "free encyclopedia that anyone can edit. " But Wadewitz eventually came out as a Wikipedian, the term the encyclopedia uses to describe the tens of thousands of volunteers who write and edit its pages. A rarity as a woman in the male-centric Wikipedia universe, she became one of its most valued and prolific contributors as well as a force for diversifying its ranks and demystifying its inner workings.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 18, 1996 | SYLVIA L. OLIANDE
A book bag is a simple thing, but until he got one Thursday, 10-year-old Eric Ruiz often felt left out and different at school. "Everybody had a backpack and I didn't," he said. Not anymore. Eric was one of 100 fifth-graders at Bassett Street Elementary School who received free personalized book bags Thursday from the Assistance League of the San Fernando Valley. Inside the black book bags, each of the students found a notebook, a glue stick, a ruler, folders, pens and pencils.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 1, 1989 | LAURIE BECKLUND, Times Staff Writer
Nancy Reagan has formally withdrawn her support of a proposed Los Angeles drug treatment center to be operated by Phoenix House and asked that 200 donors who pledged $5 million to the project be given the opportunity to transfer their donations to her own Nancy Reagan Foundation, The Times has learned. "This is a major disappointment to us," said Chris Policano, spokesman for Phoenix House in New York, a private foundation that operates a variety of drug programs across the country.
NEWS
April 6, 1990 | From Associated Press
A Gerber research plant is retooling to resume production for a market of one: a profoundly allergic 15-year-old boy who cannot live without a special baby formula the company stopped making five years ago. For a few days this month, one quarter of the production space at the Gerber Products Co. research center in Fremont, Mich., will be devoted to making MBF, a formula that only Raymond Dunn Jr. needs and which Gerber is providing free.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 26, 1988
During 1987 my husband and I, senior citizens, were deluged by requests for more money from charitable and political organizations after we had already made contributions earlier in the year. Because of that, I decided to keep a record of all requests in 1988 and not make any contributions until December. So far we have received 218 requests from 74 organizations. (They are still coming.) We have received anywhere from 2 to 16 requests from these organizations. I can't believe that the monies received are being used for research (medical)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 20, 2014 | By Tony Perry
SAN DIEGO -- A wealthy Mexican businessman, accused of hoping to buy influence with political contributions, has been indicted on a federal charge of making illegal contributions during the 2012 mayoral election. Jose Susumo Azano Matsura, 48, a Mexican citizen, was arrested without incident at his home in Coronado in San Diego County. He was arraigned Thursday in federal court. Magistrate Mitchell Dembin set bail at $5 million. Federal law makes it illegal for foreign nationals to contribute to U.S. political campaigns.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy
SACRAMENTO -- The state ethics agency's proposed $133,500 fine of lobbyist Kevin Sloat for making improper campaign contributions to lawmakers has become an issue in the race for secretary of state. One candidate for that office, Sen. Alex Padilla (D-Pacoima), was one of some 40 lawmakers and other officials who received warning letters saying that Sloat's payment of expenses at fundraisers amounted to improper campaign contributions. However, none of the lawmakers faces a penalty after investigators for the state Fair Political Practices Commission concluded they did not know some expenses for wine, liquor and cigars were paid by Sloat.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 2014 | By Soumya Karlamangla
Los Angeles' Ethics Commission is calling for an increase in public funding available to candidates seeking city office. The city currently provides $2 for each dollar a candidate raises in primary elections, and $4 for each dollar contributed in two-way runoffs in general elections. On Thursday, the panel recommended the city match be increased to $6 in both primary and general elections. "You want to allow people to talk to constituents, not just donors, and I think that increasing the match will reduce the amount of time you have to spend fundraising," said Jessica Levinson, vice president of the commission and a professor at Loyola Law School.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 16, 2014 | By Jean Merl and Richard Simon
Campaign contributions are flowing briskly to candidates in some of California's hottest congressional races, including two of the most vocal proponents of getting money out of politics. Incumbents in races in the Sacramento area, Central Valley, Bay Area and Riverside and Ventura counties each have raised more than $1 million to fend off vigorous challengers. And in San Diego County, freshman Democratic Rep. Scott Peters and his main opponent, Republican Carl DeMaio, were nearly neck and neck, with Peters taking in nearly $1.8 million to DeMaio's almost $1.5 million.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 15, 2014 | By Jean Merl
If there was ever any doubt that the race to succeed longtime Rep. Henry Waxman will be expensive, some of the campaign finance reports filed Tuesday should remove it. Fundraising and spending reports are due by midnight at the Federal Election Commission, but some candidates to succeed Waxman (D-Beverly Hills) filed a few hours earlier or provided copies of their reports to The Times. First-time candidate David Kanuth, a defense attorney, topped the list of early filers by declaring he had raised more than $798,000 by the March 30 end of the reporting period.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 5, 2014 | By Paige St. John
SACRAMENTO - A portion of the bribe money federal prosecutors say undercover FBI agents gave to state Sen. Leland Yee made its way into public campaign finance disclosures. The Times found $17,300 in contributions that match the dates and amounts, and sometimes circumstances, of payments detailed in an FBI agent's affidavit released the day the veteran lawmaker was arrested in a sting operation. According to that affidavit, the money was intended to buy influence for the New Jersey mob, secure state business, foster legislation governing marijuana dispensaries and help set up an international arms deal.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By The Times editorial board
On Wednesday, conservatives on the U.S. Supreme Court continued their project of undermining reasonable attempts by Congress to limit the corrupting influence of money in election campaigns. The same 5-4 majority that lifted limits on corporate political spending in the Citizens United decision struck down long-standing limits on the total amount a citizen can donate during an election cycle. As in Citizens United, the majority held that the restrictions violated 1st Amendment protections for political speech.
OPINION
April 3, 2014 | By Jessica A. Levinson
Thank you, Supreme Court. Before your decision Wednesday in McCutcheon vs. FEC, Americans were confined to giving a measly total of $48,600 in campaign contributions to federal candidates (enough for about nine candidates) and a total of $74,600 to political action committees. That means individuals were subject to aggregate contributions limits totaling a mere $123,200. Of course, individuals could, and still can, give unlimited sums to independent groups, such as so-called super PACs and other nonprofit corporations.
NATIONAL
April 2, 2014 | By David G. Savage and David Lauter
WASHINGTON - The Supreme Court struck another major blow against long-standing restrictions on campaign money Wednesday, freeing wealthy donors to each give a total of $3.6 million this year to the slate of candidates running for Congress. Rejecting the restriction as a violation of free speech, the 5-4 ruling struck down a Watergate-era limit that Congress wrote to prevent a single donor from writing a large check to buy influence on Capitol Hill. It was the latest sign that the court's conservative majority intends to continue dismantling funding limits created over the last four decades.
OPINION
March 31, 2014 | By Bill Whalen
Now that the California Senate has voted to suspend three of its members, all accused or convicted of criminal wrongdoing, legislators hope the issue will quickly vanish. And that's precisely the problem with this action. Giving three senators a "time out" - with pay - allows the rest of the members a chance to express outrage, genuine or feigned. However, it doesn't begin to address a larger question: Are these merely three bad apples, or is the larger orchard that is California's Legislature rotten to its core?
Los Angeles Times Articles
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