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BUSINESS
April 13, 2014 | Andrew Khouri
Arie Shashou remembers simple pleasures from the decades spent in his Westside home: helping neighbors with small tasks; the daily chats with the former manager of the complex; the paintings that line the walls of his one-bedroom. "It was a happy time," Shashou, 77, recalled on a recent Sunday afternoon. "I was hoping to die here. " That was before Shashou received an eviction notice in March. Shashou's $825-a-month rent-controlled apartment, and 17 other units, will be demolished to make way for a pricey new apartment complex.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2014 | By Chris Megerian, Melanie Mason and Hailey Branson-Potts
ORLAND, Calif. -- A witness to Thursday's deadly tour bus crash said the driver of the FedEx truck appeared to lose control while changing lanes before barreling across the center median of Interstate 5 and colliding head-on with a tour bus filled with high school students. Ryan Householder told The Times on Saturday that he was mowing his lawn, which faces the southbound lanes of the highway, when he heard screeching tires Thursday. He looked up and watched the crash occur. The drivers of both vehicles were killed as were eight people on board the tour bus. "I never thought I'd see that in real life," he said.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 8, 2014 | By Ryan Faughnder
Nick Stepka knew what gift would make his daughter's third birthday a hit, and it wasn't a toy or doll. He gave her a tablet - not a sleek new iPad or a hand-me-down Samsung, but one specifically designed and marketed for little ones. It even came with a purple protective casing and loaded with kids' apps and games. "Her eyes lit up when she opened it," said Stepka, 34, a Shakopee, Minn., father of three. "Everything else got put to the side. " That's exactly what tablet makers and companies that create children's entertainment were hoping for. PHOTOS: Top 10 gadgets we want to see this year Stepka's household is part of a growing group of consumers for whom traditional children's toys and games are not enough.
WORLD
April 8, 2014 | By Carol J. Williams
The Philippine Supreme Court on Tuesday upheld a law guaranteeing access to birth control and sex education in a country that has high maternal mortality and ranks 53rd worldwide in total fertility rate.  Implementation of the Responsible Parenthood and Reproductive Health Act, also known as the RH Law, had been on hold for the last year following challenges to it by the Roman Catholic Church and conservative politicians who questioned the...
OPINION
April 4, 2014 | By Timothy Garton Ash
BEIJING - President Xi Jinping is leading an extraordinary political experiment in China. In essence, he is trying to turn his nation into an advanced economy and three-dimensional superpower, drawing on the energies of capitalism, patriotism and Chinese traditions, yet all still under the control of what remains, at its core, a Leninist party-state. He may be a Chinese emperor, but he is also a Leninist emperor. This is the most surprising and important political experiment on Earth.
BUSINESS
April 3, 2014 | By E. Scott Reckard, This article has been corrected. See the note at the bottom for details.
Sounding alarm over an especially sinister new wave of cybercrime, regulators are warning bankers that hackers have succeeded in changing the controls on automated teller machines to allow thieves to make nearly unlimited withdrawals. The hackers often schedule the withdrawals for holidays and weekends, when extra dollars are loaded into ATMs and monitoring by the banks drops off, an umbrella group for financial regulators said Wednesday. The U.S. Secret Service is calling the scam Unlimited Operations because it circumvents the usual caps on ATM withdrawals, enabling the criminals at times to extract far more than depositors have in their accounts.
NATIONAL
March 31, 2014 | By Michael A. Memoli and David Lauter
WASHINGTON - Faced with a strong prospect of losing control of the Senate in November, Democrats have begun a high-stakes effort to try to overcome one of their party's big weaknesses: voters who don't show up for midterm elections. The party's Senate campaign committee plans to spend $60 million to boost turnout. That's nine times what it spent in the last midterm election, in 2010. The Democratic National Committee has begun to make the sophisticated data analysis tools developed to target voters in the 2012 presidential campaign available to all the party's candidates.
SPORTS
March 30, 2014 | By Mike DiGiovanna
The name is familiar, but the title is not. The Angels hired Rick Eckstein, the older brother of former World Series-winning Angels shortstop David Eckstein, as their major league player information coach in November, which begs the question: What the heck - or would that be what the Eck? - is a player information coach? In short, it's a position that combines scouting and on-field coaching duties. "It's a hybrid role," General Manager Jerry Dipoto said, "one that will be very valuable to our club.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 29, 2014 | Steve Lopez
Two opposing forces squared off last week in the latest round of a long-running battle over a $40-million mystery. In one corner was one of the most powerful heavyweights in the history of local politics: Brian D'Arcy of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers Local 18. On the other side was a wonkish, nerdy newcomer on the political scene: City Controller Ron Galperin. And the pipsqueak knocked out the bully. Los Angeles County Superior Court Judge James Chalfant ruled that Galperin has every right to issue subpoenas and audit two nonprofit trusts under the joint control of the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power and D'Arcy, who has refused to comply with requests for more information on how $40 million of ratepayer money that went to the trusts was spent.
OPINION
March 27, 2014
Re “U.S. schools remain plagued by racial inequity, data show,” March 23 Why blame the schools for the high rate of preschool (or any school) suspensions? The classroom must be manageable, with the teacher in control. When a child is disruptive, it takes a disproportionate amount of the teacher's time and energy and the learning environment for other children is spoiled. Because schools and teachers have no authority these days and are in fear of being sued, the recourse is to remove the disruptive child from the classroom.
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