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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | Associated Press
University Baptist Church has voted to leave the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship because that body opposes hiring of non-celibate gays and lesbians and funding of pro-gay causes. This is not the first time the Austin church has left a larger Baptist group. It was previously ousted by Southern Baptist city and state organizations after installing a gay deacon, but retains affiliation with the American Baptist Churches.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 25, 2001 | Associated Press
University Baptist Church has voted to leave the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship because that body opposes hiring of non-celibate gays and lesbians and funding of pro-gay causes. This is not the first time the Austin church has left a larger Baptist group. It was previously ousted by Southern Baptist city and state organizations after installing a gay deacon, but retains affiliation with the American Baptist Churches.
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NEWS
July 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, formed 10 years ago as a moderate alternative to the Southern Baptist Convention, has appointed another woman to its top leadership position. Donna Forrester is the first ordained woman and fifth woman named to lead the 1,800-church fellowship in Greenville. She has been the minister of pastoral care and counseling at Greenville First Baptist Church since 1989.
NEWS
July 23, 2000 | From Times Wire Reports
The Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, formed 10 years ago as a moderate alternative to the Southern Baptist Convention, has appointed another woman to its top leadership position. Donna Forrester is the first ordained woman and fifth woman named to lead the 1,800-church fellowship in Greenville. She has been the minister of pastoral care and counseling at Greenville First Baptist Church since 1989.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2000 | Religion News Service
The coordinator of the moderate Cooperative Baptist Fellowship has predicted that changes in the Southern Baptist Convention's statement of faith will prompt as many as 5,000 churches to leave the denomination and join the fellowship. "I am convinced there are thousands of Baptists that believe in our core values and share our vision and want to become part of CBF," said Dan Vestal, coordinator of the fellowship, at its General Assembly in Orlando.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 19, 2003 | From Times Wire Services
A group representing moderate Southern Baptists who split from the conservative leadership of their denomination has been granted membership in the Baptist World Alliance. The alliance -- an association of Baptist faiths around the globe -- voted at a July 11 meeting in Brazil to approve the application of the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, based in Atlanta, over the objections of the Southern Baptist Convention.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 7, 1993 | From Religious News Service
A third Southern Baptist missions leader has switched his allegiance to the missions agency of the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship, an organization of Southern Baptist dissidents opposed to fundamentalist control of the 15 million-member denomination. The most recent switch became official with the appointment of the Rev. Harlan E. Spurgeon on July 28 as a leader of the Global Missions Ministry Group of the Fellowship, based in Atlanta.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 11, 2000 | Associated Press
Conservatives maintained control of the 623,000-member Missouri Baptist Convention at a meeting held just after the Texas convention moved the opposite way by radically reducing support for the headquarters and seminaries of the Southern Baptist Convention. Missouri representatives endorsed revisions in the Southern Baptist doctrinal platform that were a major cause of the Texas rebellion.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 11, 1994 | From Associated Press
Conservatives who won the battle for control of the Southern Baptist Convention are finding the strife is not over in the nation's largest Protestant denomination. The firing of a popular seminary president and the growing strength of a splinter group have placed the Southern Baptist Convention at its most significant crossroads since the conservative takeover of the denomination, some observers say.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 2, 1991
The Rev. Jess Moody, pastor of the nearly completed $15-million Shepherd of the Hills Church in Chatsworth, has told a Southern Baptist news agency that he agreed to be nominated for the presidency of that denomination in a last-ditch effort at reconciliation between victorious fundamentalist leaders and moderates who have drifted away.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 8, 2000 | Religion News Service
The coordinator of the moderate Cooperative Baptist Fellowship has predicted that changes in the Southern Baptist Convention's statement of faith will prompt as many as 5,000 churches to leave the denomination and join the fellowship. "I am convinced there are thousands of Baptists that believe in our core values and share our vision and want to become part of CBF," said Dan Vestal, coordinator of the fellowship, at its General Assembly in Orlando.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 11, 1999 | Religion News Service
Paige Patterson, president of the Southern Baptist Convention, has predicted that some kind of division is in the offing for the denomination--the nation's largest Protestant denomination--but he expects less than a tenth of the group's churches to depart. Conservatives and moderates in the denomination are "much farther apart theologically than some people imagine," said Patterson, who is one of the Baptist convention's leading conservatives. "Why sit around and cripple what everybody's doing?"
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 29, 1995 | From Religion News Service
Baptist moderates who attended last week's convention of the Cooperative Baptist Fellowship live a schizophrenic existence--one foot planted in the conservative-controlled Southern Baptist Convention and the other in their own moderate fellowship. Now, impatient rumblings are building among some moderates who want to form their own denomination.
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