Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsCoors Field
IN THE NEWS

Coors Field

FEATURED ARTICLES
SPORTS
April 19, 1997 | From Associated Press
After a slow start, Kenny Lofton is starting to tame National League pitching, while Tom Glavine is doing his best to tame Coors Field. Glavine pitched his first shutout since 1995--when he earned the first one ever at Coors Field--and Lofton had five hits Friday night, leading the Atlanta Braves over the Colorado Rockies 14-0. "I love this place," quipped Glavine, who gave up seven earned runs--the most in his career--during his last visit to Coors Field.
ARTICLES BY DATE
SPORTS
September 2, 2013 | By Dylan Hernandez
DENVER - Clayton Kershaw and Yasiel Puig didn't last six innings Monday, but both insisted they were fine after the Dodgers' 10-8 victory over the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field. Kershaw was credited with his 14th win but had what was his worst start of the season, as he was charged with a season-high five earned runs and a career-high 11 hits in five innings. He said he wasn't fatigued, even though this was his second rough start in a row. "I haven't hit a wall before," Kershaw said.
Advertisement
SPORTS
June 9, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
DENVER - Coors Field is still considered a hitter's park, but it's nowhere near the launching pad it was when Angels General Manager Jerry Dipoto pitched for the Rockies from 1997-2000, when it was known as Coors Canaveral. "I told my wife after I retired that I did OK for myself here," said Dipoto, who went 9-6 with a 3.95 earned-run average and 13 homers given up in 128 career games in Coors Field. "But 20 or 30 years from now, when we're sitting on the porch with our grandkids, they're going to say, 'Grandpa stunk.' Well, it was much harder than it looked.
SPORTS
September 2, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
Among other things, the Dodgers can win awkwardly. They can win on those exceedingly rare occasions when ace pitcher Clayton Kershaw is something less than brilliant, can win when closer Kenley Jansen gives up a home run and can win when they almost just seem to hang on. And as a result, it is probably time to consider something that would have been absolutely unthinkable back on June 22 when the Dodgers were 9 1/2 games back in the National League...
SPORTS
September 1, 1997 | From Associated Press
Larry Walker hit his National League-leading 39th and 40th home runs, including a 493-foot shot that was the longest in Coors Field history, as the Colorado Rockies defeated Oakland, 10-4, for their sixth consecutive win. "A home run is a home run and that's the bottom line," Walker said. "I'll open the paper tomorrow and it will say home run. So I'll take that one that I hit off the top of the fence as well." Walker drove in four runs and had three hits, raising his batting average to .378.
SPORTS
May 25, 2003 | From Associated Press
New York Mets' second baseman Roberto Alomar slammed his bat in disgust as his flyball drifted toward right field, then he broke into a home run trot after the ball bounced off the top of the wall into the stands. Two weeks earlier, San Diego manager Bruce Bochy calmly talked to reporters after his team blew a 9-7 lead in the ninth inning, then kicked a water cooler and yelled "I hate this place!" as he walked into the coaches' office.
SPORTS
April 27, 1995 | ROB PARKER, NEWSDAY
If Mayor Rudolph Giuliani wants his tenure to be remembered for more than just bad hair, a vulgar TV appearance on Letterman and a funny, camera-hogging son, he should get on a plane immediately and come here. Here being Coors Field. The new, $215.5-million home of the Colorado Rockies is exactly what New York needs. In fact, it couldn't happen soon enough.
SPORTS
July 12, 1998 | THOMAS BOSWELL, WASHINGTON POST
Coors Field is a beautiful joke. Those who feel that the home of the Colorado Rockies is one of the half-dozen most gorgeous parks in baseball are absolutely right. And those who feel that the mile-high stadium is an abomination that turns the sport into a third-rate freak show also are totally correct. No better park could have been built in Denver than Coors Field. Even more than Camden Yards in Baltimore, it evokes the best of the old yards from the 1950s.
SPORTS
August 18, 1999 | From Associated Press
For one night, Coors Field played like a normal ballpark. After a lengthy pregame storm, five Colorado Rockies' pitchers held off the Atlanta Braves despite giving up 10 hits in a 3-2 victory Tuesday night at Denver. The five runs marked the fewest at Coors Field since Darryl Kile two-hit the New York Mets in a 3-1 victory Sept. 10.
SPORTS
September 2, 2005 | Tim Brown, Times Staff Writer
It was Bryn Smith who threw the first major league pitch in Denver, 12 1/2 years ago on a mild afternoon at Mile High Stadium. It didn't leave the park. In fact, it didn't do anything particularly screwy at all. So, he threw another one. The Rockies were off, through two years in a football stadium, the rest at Coors Field, and the phenomenon that is the pitcher at an altitude of one mile plus a pile of dirt ascended from there. Baseballs soared, and pitchers sighed, and hitters benefited.
SPORTS
July 13, 2013 | By Andrew Gastelum
What used to be the Yasiel Puig Home Run Watch has turned into the Puig Injury Watch. For the second consecutive game, Dodgers Manager Don Mattingly pulled the 22-year-old outfielder from the game because of an aggravated left hip. "This is day to day," Mattingly said after the Dodgers' 3-0 loss to Colorado. "We just have to do a better job of communicating. Guys get banged up, if he needs a day off ... there's no shame in that. " Puig, who was pulled in the fifth inning after grounding out twice, said his condition improved from Thursday, when he was taken out in the eighth inning.
SPORTS
July 12, 2013 | By Andrew Gastelum
On July 3, Dodgers outfielder Yasiel Puig pulled a Clark Kent and nearly ran through a wall at Coors Field. Turns out, the collision is still having its effects. Dodgers Manager Don Mattingly pulled Puig in the top of the eighth inning of a 6-1 win over Colorado on Thursday night after he aggravated his left hip. Mattingly said Puig might have irritated it while running out an infield single in the fourth inning. “It didn't seem serious, but as the game went on it looked like ... it may have been tightening up a little bit,” Mattingly said.
SPORTS
July 12, 2013 | By Andrew Gastelum
Dodgers left fielder Carl Crawford was scratched from the lineup with lower back stiffness before batting practice Friday, but rookie Yasiel Puig will start in right field after leaving a 6-1 win in the eighth inning Thursday with an aggravated left hip. Skip Schumacher, back from his two-game suspension for his role in the June 11 brawl against Arizona, will start in place of Crawford in left field and bat leadoff. “He's having a little back stiffness,” Dodgers Manager Don Mattingly said of Crawford.
SPORTS
April 16, 2013 | By Steve Dilbeck
  Tony Gwynn Jr., come back. Don't care if you hit a buck fifty, that you're currently batting .207 at triple-A Albuquerque. Baseball could use more of this kind of humor. This video is actually from June 13, 2011, but in one of those hard-to- explain Internet phenomena, it has now gained new life. It was somehow recently discovered on YouTube by Deadspin, and off it goes. Unfortunately it can no longer be embedded, but it's worth jumping to the link. The video shows our man Gwynn deftly handling a heckler as the Dodgers played the Colorado Rockies at Coors Field.
SPORTS
September 7, 2012 | By Steve Dilbeck
Matt Kemp says the right things, says the kind of things you would hope he would say about his recent offensive struggles. “It's frustrating, but I can't dwell on the past,” Kemp said. “I have to turn the page and do better.” The current numbers, however, are not good. The Dodgers' best player is in a slump, and at exactly the wrong time of the season. He was batting .357 back on Aug. 15 when things started to turn. In his last 68 at-bats, he's hit .182 with four RBI. His on-base and slugging percentage are both a foreign-looking .250.
SPORTS
August 28, 2012 | By Dylan Hernandez
DENVER — Matt Kemp had left Coors Field before the Dodgers' 8-4 loss to the last-place Colorado Rockies was final, his right knee bruised and his jaw stitched from a head-on crash with the center-field wall in the first inning. As the Dodgers tried to make sense of how they'd lost three consecutive games with Adrian Gonzalez in their lineup and dropped 31/2 games back of first-place San Francisco in the National League West, their minds were also on Kemp's test results. Kemp was scheduled to undergo an MRI exam on his knee and a CAT scan on his jaw Tuesday night.
SPORTS
September 19, 1996 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Hideo Nomo never slept. Couldn't sleep. If the phone wasn't ringing in his hotel room, his mind was spinning. He started comprehending what he had accomplished by the time he left the Dodger clubhouse Tuesday night, having pitched the first no-hitter in the history of Coors Field, beating the Colorado Rockies, 9-0. And if he still wasn't impressed by his accomplishment by the time he left Coors Field, all it took was a quick visit to the local 7-Eleven.
SPORTS
September 16, 1996 | BOB NIGHTENGALE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dodger pitcher Ismael Valdes casually glanced at the Dodger Stadium scoreboard last week, read the out-of-town scores, and his eyes bugged out. "Hey, who pitched for the Braves today?" Valdes breathlessly asked a reporter. "John Smoltz." "Oh no, no, no, no," Valdes said, covering his face with his hands. "I can't believe it. That place got him too. Oh, man."
NEWS
June 9, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
DENVER - Mike Trout, Torii Hunter and Howie Kendrick each had three hits, and Albert Pujols homered and drove in four runs to lead the Angels to an 11-5 interleague victory over the Colorado Rockies on Saturday at Coors Field. The balanced and relentless attack of the Angels, who racked up 15 hits, 14 of them singles, and scored in six of nine innings, offset the power of the Rockies, who hit five home runs, all solo shots, including two by right fielder Tyler Colvin. Angels starter Dan Haren gave up 10 hits, including four homers, in 5 1/3 innings but weathered the 90-degree heat to gain the victory and improve to 4-6 despite tying a career high for homers allowed in a game.
SPORTS
June 9, 2012 | By Mike DiGiovanna
DENVER - Coors Field is still considered a hitter's park, but it's nowhere near the launching pad it was when Angels General Manager Jerry Dipoto pitched for the Rockies from 1997-2000, when it was known as Coors Canaveral. "I told my wife after I retired that I did OK for myself here," said Dipoto, who went 9-6 with a 3.95 earned-run average and 13 homers given up in 128 career games in Coors Field. "But 20 or 30 years from now, when we're sitting on the porch with our grandkids, they're going to say, 'Grandpa stunk.' Well, it was much harder than it looked.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|