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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1992
We support the coot shoot on Lake Mission Viejo. Coots are ugly, filthy pests that are not needed. Let's get rid of them. WREN CAMPBELL, Mission Viejo
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 21, 2011 | By Steve Chawkins, Los Angeles Times
For Neal Taylor, fishing wasn't limited to weekends or, for that matter, water. On one of Santa Barbara's busiest streets, the seven-time national casting champion showed a friend just how it's done, lofting his line into an intersection when the light turned red and yanking it back when traffic resumed. "I thought, this guy is really funny," said Bob Nunez, a dentist and one of Taylor's closest fishing buddies. "I thought, I love this guy. " Taylor died Tuesday at his Santa Barbara home.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 23, 1992
Oxnard's latest outrage is shooting American coots (Fulica americana) to preserve an artificial environment--a golf course. What planet and century do the Oxnard parks and recreation people think they inhabit? This golf course was foolishly placed next to a public eyesore, our methane-oozing landfill, and its design included a series of attractive nuisances, i.e., water hazards that are known to attract duffers and coots alike. The stage was set for conflict. Since duffers belong to a lordly species who believe themselves destined to play on celestial links soon after their deaths and are therefore not required to consider the consequences of their actions, the poor coots were selected for elimination, ostensibly for the heinous crime of being in the way and "defecating on the grass."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 8, 2010 | Mcclatchy-Tribune News Service
Edward "Coots" Matthews, a famed oil well firefighter and part of a trio who inspired the 1968 movie "Hellfighters" starring John Wayne, died March 31 of natural causes at his home in Humble, Texas. He was 86. Matthews and Asger "Boots" Hansen co-founded Houston-based Boots & Coots International Well Control Inc. in 1978 after a 20-year career fighting oil well fires alongside counterpart -- and later rival -- Paul "Red" Adair. In a true roughneck-to-riches story, Matthews helped build Boots & Coots into a company with one of the most recognizable names in the oil industry.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1994 | JAN STEVENS
Coot-shooting season has resumed at River Ridge Golf Club, and animal lovers this week fired a few verbal shots at golf course officials. Camarillo resident Kim Turnbull said she saw golf course employees shoot sea gulls and coots at the Oxnard course Monday in violation of a federal permit.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 1987 | STEVE EMMONS, Times Staff Writer
Even in the most planned and managed community in Orange County, plans have gone askew. The man-made lakes of Woodbridge in Irvine have attracted--that's right--migratory water fowl, and they refuse to conform to the community's regulations. The worst offender by far is the coot, officially the American coot. By the hundreds, they arrive uninvited in the fall and for months meander ashore to eat the lush Irvine landscaping.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 10, 1988 | BILL BILLITER and GEORGE BUNDY SMITH, Times Staff Writers
William M. Schwartz has a million-dollar view from his Lake Mission Viejo Assn. office window. But on Friday, Schwartz, who is the general manager of the association, looked out the window with a pained, agonized expression. He was looking at the coots, the scores of small, black waterfowl paddling around Lake Mission Viejo. "Basically, the coots defecate all over everything. . . . Coots hurt the lake. They hurt the landscaping because they eat the grass and the seeds. They're a real problem."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 18, 1992 | SANTIAGO O'DONNELL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was 10 days after the Great Coot Massacre at Oxnard's River Ridge golf course, and little had changed. As usual, there were more coots than golfers. The coots were doing what coots always do. And the golfers were complaining about them. Some of them, in fact, could hardly wait for the shooting to start again sometime next week. The coot problem has been ongoing at River Ridge since the course opened in 1987. Hundreds of coots like to gather on the putting greens.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 25, 1993
Andres Herrera, Oxnard city councilman I think the city has taken several approaches and this is the one that is the most effective in the course of trying to protect its investment and, at the same time, eradicate the problem that these birds leave, which is the destruction of that property. There have been other attempts, other methods that have been used that have not been as effective and that have caused problems for other migratory fowl. And at this point, this has been proven the most effective method for trying to resolve this matter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1985
Maybe I'm too sensitive, but in a recent story in The Times, (Sept. 16), the writer used the term "trailer" five times in describing a mobile home park. The story was about a flock of coots--a duck-like bird--that had taken up residence in the "trailer park's man-made lakes." I don't profess to be an expert on coots, but I do believe I am knowledgeable enough about mobile homes, having lived in one--by choice--for five years. That antiquated term "trailer park" unfortunately comes saddled with all sorts of negative baggage.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2008 | Scott Gold, Times Staff Writer
For seven years, migrating birds known as American coots have taken up residence in the 15-acre, man-made lake that serves as the centerpiece of Bridgeport, a subdivision in Valencia, amid the thirsty bluffs of the Santa Clarita Valley. For almost as long, the homeowners association's board of directors has floated a simple solution: kill them. Some of them, anyway.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 4, 2000 | KENNETH TURAN, TIMES FILM CRITIC
It's called "Space Cowboys," but it ought to be "Space Codgers." The story of a quartet of "Leisure World aviators" who want to prove they won't be old and in the way in outer space, this is a mostly genial film that gets as much mileage as it can out of the undeniable charisma of its stars. Like many charmers, it involves us against our better judgment, but only for a while.
SPORTS
June 17, 1999 | MIKE JAMES, TIMES ASSISTANT SPORTS EDITOR
The American coot. By definition, Fulica americana is a black, ducklike migratory water fowl that ranges from British Columbia to South America, passing through Southern California each winter like an uninvited in-law. It's not particularly attractive, isn't all that graceful and, depending on whom you talk to, is either crafty as a fox or dumb as, well, an old coot.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 27, 1999 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The coots of Rancho Santa Margarita were dead center in a testy standoff Tuesday between a trio of animal-rights activists, sheriff's deputies and a company hired to kill the water birds at the planned community's artificial lake. One activist was arrested and as many as 200 of the birds were killed. But accounts differed over the day's events, which capped a two-week debate over the birds' fate. That debate began Jan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 26, 1999 | JASON LEOPOLD, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Let the coots live. That's what about 50 protesters were shouting Monday afternoon outside a lakeside community in Rancho Santa Margarita. About 200 of the birds are expected to be destroyed by week's end, said officials with Merit Property Management, managers of the Sam Lark Housing Development. "I think this decision to kill, kill, kill is overkill," said resident Helen Howard. "It's absurd. They can't justify it."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 23, 1999 | CHRIS CEBALLOS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Animal-rights activists expressed dismay Friday after learning that Rancho Santa Margarita will proceed with plans to have 200 coots killed. Representatives of Merit Property Management, which oversees the South County community's services, have applied for the federal permit to kill the coots, even though the birds will begin migrating to Canada within weeks, said Ava Park, founder of Orange County People for Animals. "This action is premature and unnecessary," she said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1999 | NANCY WRIDE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As many as 200 coots received a last-minute reprieve Wednesday when the governing board of the Rancho Santa Margarita community--responding to a request by a national animal rights organization--decided to put off its planned execution of the bothersome waterfowl occupying its lake. "The board has decided to hold off . . . to research the situation . . .
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