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TRAVEL
April 7, 2002
I read James T. Yenckel's article about Napa Valley ("Napa for Next to Nada," March 24) two days after returning from a wonderful day trip there. Although I agreed with much of what he said, I was shocked that he found Copia disappointing. Visiting Copia was the highlight of my trip. I had originally planned to just stop by and check it out, but I stayed more than three hours. The exhibits were entertaining; the gardens were a delight; there were numerous tours offered that day, and free mustard and Chardonnay tastings; the cafe offered good food and a relaxing environment.
ARTICLES BY DATE
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Mike Grgich's 1973 Chateau Montelena Chardonnay helped turn the wine world on its head by winning the famed Judgment of Paris , in which a panel of predominantly French wine judges did the unthinkable by scoring California wines over their own. It was an event so earthshaking they made a movie out of it in 2008 called “Bottle Shock.” But Grgich insists he wasn't at all surprised, for one simple reason: "We knew how good the wine...
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OPINION
January 9, 2002
Re "Catholics Slam Napa Art Exhibit," Jan. 5: The protest over the exhibit at Copia is surprising, considering that the use of scatological imagery can be traced back to late 11th and early 12th century Gothic manuscripts, where marginal illustrations decorated the edges of psalters and books of hours. Members of the clergy performing earthly acts were used with humorous--and sometimes satirical--meanings, depending on the context, to entertain the readers. Copia should be applauded for embracing artistic expression, and the groups complaining should focus on more pressing issues, such as overpopulation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 14, 2009 | STEVE LOPEZ
OK, I've read through hundreds of 50-word essays by readers who had some words of wisdom for Dodger star Manny Ramirez, and I've decided who gets my two World Series tickets. But first, let me tell you what a rough week I've had. For starters, I was attacked by fellow muckraker T.J. Simers. He didn't like the column I wrote last week, taking a couple of whacks at the dread-locked Dodger star who was run out of Boston for dogging it but embraced like a hero in L.A. Simers, the Page 2 sports guy, has been blowing air kisses at Ramirez all season despite the left fielder's 50-game suspension for a banned substance, his lack of hustle, and his less-than-splendid performance, and all I can say is we're lucky Simers doesn't cover the mayor.
FOOD
July 8, 2009 | Betty Hallock
What's a town gotta do to gain some cachet? The city of Napa has new homes, new hotels, new shops and new restaurants. The once-neglected river that runs through town has been reclaimed, historic buildings have been restored, and developers have poured hundreds of millions of dollars into downtown.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2008 | Associated Press
A man convicted last month was sentenced Monday to three years in prison for his part in a dog fighting operation run out of a South Los Angeles home, authorities said. Arnett William Counts, 42, was arrested in 2007 after a probation search of the home found 17 adult pit bulls and four puppies, said Los Angeles County district attorney's spokeswoman Shiara Davila.
OPINION
November 22, 2001
I welcome the article on Copia: The American Center for Food, Wine & the Arts ("A Monument to the Good Life in Napa," Nov. 17). More than "a monument to the art of living well," Copia is yet another manifestation of what sets us apart from animals. Man, like animals, engages in organized activities (e.g., females of a pride of lions engaged in cooperative hunting) and lives in beneficial communities (bees in a beehive). Man, unlike animals, can and does create artifacts to be enjoyed by generations yet to come.
NEWS
April 17, 2013 | By Russ Parsons
Mike Grgich's 1973 Chateau Montelena Chardonnay helped turn the wine world on its head by winning the famed Judgment of Paris , in which a panel of predominantly French wine judges did the unthinkable by scoring California wines over their own. It was an event so earthshaking they made a movie out of it in 2008 called “Bottle Shock.” But Grgich insists he wasn't at all surprised, for one simple reason: "We knew how good the wine...
FOOD
December 3, 2008 | Russ Parsons, Parsons is a Times staff writer.
Copia, the nearly $80-million museum of wine and food started in the town of Napa by the late vintner Robert Mondavi, has closed and is filing for protection from bankruptcy. The nonprofit center has been struggling to find an audience for years, and various reports have had it losing as much as $4 million a year since it opened in 2001. In September, it laid off 24 of its 80 full-time employees and cut back to being open only three days a week.
NEWS
May 4, 1987
Mas copias de la guia sobre la nueva ley de inmigracion se pueden obtener en: Catholic Charities Legalization Centers. Lutheran Social Services of Southern California, 1345 S. Burlington Ave., Los Angeles. Member stores of the Mexican-American Grocers Assn. International Institute, 435 S. Boyle Ave., Los Angeles. Mexican-American Legal Defense and Education Fund (MALDEF), 634 S. Spring St., Los Angeles. Los Angeles County Bar Assn., 300 N. Los Angeles St., Room 4349, Los Angeles.
FOOD
July 8, 2009 | Betty Hallock
What's a town gotta do to gain some cachet? The city of Napa has new homes, new hotels, new shops and new restaurants. The once-neglected river that runs through town has been reclaimed, historic buildings have been restored, and developers have poured hundreds of millions of dollars into downtown.
FOOD
December 3, 2008 | Russ Parsons, Parsons is a Times staff writer.
Copia, the nearly $80-million museum of wine and food started in the town of Napa by the late vintner Robert Mondavi, has closed and is filing for protection from bankruptcy. The nonprofit center has been struggling to find an audience for years, and various reports have had it losing as much as $4 million a year since it opened in 2001. In September, it laid off 24 of its 80 full-time employees and cut back to being open only three days a week.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 2, 2008 | Associated Press
A man convicted last month was sentenced Monday to three years in prison for his part in a dog fighting operation run out of a South Los Angeles home, authorities said. Arnett William Counts, 42, was arrested in 2007 after a probation search of the home found 17 adult pit bulls and four puppies, said Los Angeles County district attorney's spokeswoman Shiara Davila.
FOOD
May 30, 2007 | Corie Brown, Times Staff Writer
COPIA is reinventing itself. Again. Now that grandiose plans to elevate the Napa center for food, wine and the arts into the top ranks of American cultural institutions have collapsed, its president is refocusing Copia on one simple idea: wine. A vision to supplant the older, more established New York-based James Beard Foundation as the standard-bearer for America's food culture has been abandoned.
FOOD
April 27, 2005 | Corie Brown, Times Staff Writer
There were no tears when the Napa Valley vintners running Copia: The American Center for Wine, Food & the Arts learned that America's leading food society, the James Beard Foundation, was reeling from an internal financial scandal. A crisis at the vaunted Beard Foundation? At Copia, they're calling that "timely opportunity."
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2003 | Lewis Segal, Times Staff Writer
Although the program notes for "In Bella Copia" (Fair Copy) spread comforting homilies about daring to be our true selves, a much darker vision pervaded this provocative, strongly performed dance drama from the Czech-based Deja Donne company at the REDCAT Theater on Wednesday.
NEWS
June 30, 1987
Additional copies of Becoming Legal: a Guide to the New Immigration Law in the Workplace are available at: The Back Issues counter, The Los Angeles Times, 145 S. Spring St., Los Angeles. The information desk, LA OPINION, 1436 S. Main Street, Los Angeles.
TRAVEL
April 7, 2002
I read James T. Yenckel's article about Napa Valley ("Napa for Next to Nada," March 24) two days after returning from a wonderful day trip there. Although I agreed with much of what he said, I was shocked that he found Copia disappointing. Visiting Copia was the highlight of my trip. I had originally planned to just stop by and check it out, but I stayed more than three hours. The exhibits were entertaining; the gardens were a delight; there were numerous tours offered that day, and free mustard and Chardonnay tastings; the cafe offered good food and a relaxing environment.
OPINION
January 9, 2002
Re "Catholics Slam Napa Art Exhibit," Jan. 5: The protest over the exhibit at Copia is surprising, considering that the use of scatological imagery can be traced back to late 11th and early 12th century Gothic manuscripts, where marginal illustrations decorated the edges of psalters and books of hours. Members of the clergy performing earthly acts were used with humorous--and sometimes satirical--meanings, depending on the context, to entertain the readers. Copia should be applauded for embracing artistic expression, and the groups complaining should focus on more pressing issues, such as overpopulation.
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