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October 9, 2005 | W.S. Merwin
At sundown when a day's words have gathered at the feet of the trees lining up in silence to enter the long corridors of the roots into which they pass one by one thinking that they remember the place as they feel themselves climbing away from their only sound while they are being forgotten by their bright circumstances they rise through all of the rings listening again afterward as they listened once and they come to where the leaves used to live during their lives but have gone now and they
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December 5, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
Stepping Stones Interviews with Seamus Heaney Edited by Dennis O'Driscoll Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $18 paper Irish Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney is our greatest living poet, and here's a combination for connoisseurs. "Stepping Stones" is a book-length series of linked interviews with the poet conducted by poet Dennis O'Driscoll. It all adds up to an autobiography. When Heaney recently turned 70, Ireland's national radio had the poet record his readings of his poems for broadcast.
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BOOKS
July 24, 2005 | Amy Uyematsu
Grandpa was good at persuading the others after the official evacuation orders. Detained at Tulare Assembly Center, he was the voice of reason among his angry friends, raising everyone's spirits when he started the morning exercise class. Some issei said Grandpa couldn't be trusted -- after all, hadn't he volunteered to fight in World War I? And why did he speak better English or brag that he was already a U.S. citizen when the government denounced them as aliens?
BOOKS
July 8, 2007 | Amy Gerstler, Amy Gerstler is a poet whose book "Bitter Angel" won a National Book Critics Circle Award.
IF there's such a thing as an "old soul," then W.S. Merwin surely is one. This has been evident over a long career, in his questioning, vatic voice and dreamy, meticulously crafted poetry. It's clear in his poems' commitment to the big mysteries and their explorations of archetypal disquiet, infinite bereftness and protective tenderness toward Mother Earth.
BOOKS
February 9, 2003 | Dana Gioia, Dana Gioia is the author of three volumes of poetry, "Daily Horoscope," "The Gods of Winter" and "Interrogations at Noon," which won the American Book Award in 2002. He is the new chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts.
At the time of his death in 1982, Kenneth Rexroth's reputation was in decline. Honored as a mentor to the Beats and remembered as San Francisco's leading literary intellectual, he was no longer widely read as a poet. His best-known works were translations, especially those from the Chinese and Japanese, and his cultural journalism published mainly in the Saturday Review.
BOOKS
June 15, 1997
Prayers of many summers come to roost on a moment until it sinks under them and they resume their journey flying by night with the sound of blood rushing in an ear From "Flower & Hand: Poems 1977-1983," by W.S. Merwin (Copper Canyon Press: 172 pp., $15)
BOOKS
March 30, 2003 | Miklos Radnoti
I look at the mountain from the window, it does not see me. I hide, I write a poem, not that it matters, and I see the old grace. It is useless. As before, the moon cuts into the sky and the cherry opens. May 9, 1944 Translated from the Hungarian by Stephen Berg, S.S. Marks and Steven Polgar, from "This Art: Poems About Poetry," edited by Michael Wiegers (Copper Canyon Press: 168 pp., $12 paper)
BOOKS
April 6, 2003 | Joseph Stroud
I think of Issa often these days, his poems about the loneliness of fleas, watermelons becoming frogs to escape from thieves. Moon in solstice, snowfall under the earth, I dream of a pure life. Issa said of his child, She smooths the wrinkles from my heart. Yes, it's a dewdrop world. Inside the pear there's a paradise we will never know, our only hint the sweetness of its taste. From "The Poet's Child," edited by Michael Wiegers (Copper Canyon Press: 144 pp., $12 paper)
BOOKS
August 14, 2005 | Amy Uyematsu
Editor's Note: This poem appeared in the Aug. 7 Book Review with a word erroneously added to the first line and missing the next-to-last stanza. Here is the poem in its entirety. stone in water growing still water in stone still growing in the I whose eye in the eye what sky in the sky where's I ow-ow-ow-ow-howl ow-ow-ow-ow-owl ow-ow-ow-ow-wow ow-ow-ow-ow-bow the nothingness of all the whole in the hole how perfect a fit From "Stone Bow Prayer" (Copper Canyon Press: 130 pp., $14 )
BOOKS
March 30, 2003 | C.D. Wright
This isn't the end. It simply cannot be the end. It is a road. You go ahead coatless, light- soaked, more rutilant than the road. The soles of your shoes sparkle. You walk softly as you move further inside your subject. It is a living season. The trees are anxious to be included. The car with fins beams through countless oncoming points of rage and need. The sloughed-off cells under our bed form little hills of dead matter. If the most sidereal drink is pain, the most soothing clock is music.
BOOKS
December 17, 2006 | Allan M. Jalon, Allan M. Jalon writes about books and culture for publications including the San Francisco Chronicle.
PALESTINIAN culture hasn't traveled easily to this country. Earlier this year, a show by Palestinian visual artists received dozens of rejections from American venues before getting a few invitations. In 2002, when the Al-Kasaba Theatre of Ramallah brought vignettes about daily life under Israeli occupation to New Haven, Conn., headlines erupted: Some Jews denounced the play as a Trojan horse for anti-Israel propaganda, demanding onstage panel discussions, while others embraced it as fine art.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 25, 2006 | Elizabeth Hoover, Special to The Times
ALTHOUGH her reputation has grown steadily over the years, poet Madeline DeFrees' career has been a quiet one, often overlooked because she steadfastly refuses to lock step with literary trends. She studied under Karl Shapiro and John Berryman but refused to write the confessional-style poetry they advocated. She seeks to remain anonymous in her writing, although over the years her work has begun to welcome an identifiable speaker.
BOOKS
October 9, 2005 | W.S. Merwin
At sundown when a day's words have gathered at the feet of the trees lining up in silence to enter the long corridors of the roots into which they pass one by one thinking that they remember the place as they feel themselves climbing away from their only sound while they are being forgotten by their bright circumstances they rise through all of the rings listening again afterward as they listened once and they come to where the leaves used to live during their lives but have gone now and they
BOOKS
August 14, 2005 | Amy Uyematsu
Editor's Note: This poem appeared in the Aug. 7 Book Review with a word erroneously added to the first line and missing the next-to-last stanza. Here is the poem in its entirety. stone in water growing still water in stone still growing in the I whose eye in the eye what sky in the sky where's I ow-ow-ow-ow-howl ow-ow-ow-ow-owl ow-ow-ow-ow-wow ow-ow-ow-ow-bow the nothingness of all the whole in the hole how perfect a fit From "Stone Bow Prayer" (Copper Canyon Press: 130 pp., $14 )
BOOKS
July 24, 2005 | Amy Uyematsu
Grandpa was good at persuading the others after the official evacuation orders. Detained at Tulare Assembly Center, he was the voice of reason among his angry friends, raising everyone's spirits when he started the morning exercise class. Some issei said Grandpa couldn't be trusted -- after all, hadn't he volunteered to fight in World War I? And why did he speak better English or brag that he was already a U.S. citizen when the government denounced them as aliens?
BOOKS
August 15, 2004 | Joseph Stroud
Look -- a web strung from the lamp, moths entombed in silk, suspended in air, and nestled against the shade a spider, eyes glittering like distant stars -- The Gates are burning. The City's on fire. The Body collapses in ash. Neither song, nor poem, nor any honeycomb of joy, O Sleeper, shall be your coin of passage.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 5, 2010 | By Tim Rutten, Los Angeles Times
Stepping Stones Interviews with Seamus Heaney Edited by Dennis O'Driscoll Farrar, Straus & Giroux, $18 paper Irish Nobel Laureate Seamus Heaney is our greatest living poet, and here's a combination for connoisseurs. "Stepping Stones" is a book-length series of linked interviews with the poet conducted by poet Dennis O'Driscoll. It all adds up to an autobiography. When Heaney recently turned 70, Ireland's national radio had the poet record his readings of his poems for broadcast.
BOOKS
October 28, 2001 | CAROL MUSKE-DUKES
ROOMS ARE NEVER FINISHED, By Agha Shahid Ali, W.W. Norton: 106 pp., $22 Those who do not understand poetry think it alters (as Shakespeare said of false love) on impulse, changes its essence with the introduction of new linguistic or philosophical movements, academic theories or trends. They fail to grasp the timeless nature of the art.
BOOKS
September 14, 2003 | Andrew Frisardi, Andrew Frisardi is the translator of "Giuseppe Ungaretti: Selected Poems."
When Cesare Pavese started publishing in the early 1930s, Italian fascism was at its height. Everything about fascism, not least of all its nationalism, was repugnant to Pavese, who was arrested for subversive activities and sent for three years to a remote town in southern Italy.
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