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Copper Curtain

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 26, 2000
Re "Keep It Simple, Set It Free: Much-Maligned Copper Curtain Needs a Tweak, Not a Sledgehammer or an Infusion of Cash," Ventura County Perspective, April 23. Thanks to Roger Krenkler for his perspective on the copper curtain. I remember voting on this more than a year ago. Tell the politicians to quit spending their time and our money on this. Start spending the time on other issues such as avoiding sewage-spill fines and start making decisions like any normal for-profit company would do. KENT WEBSTER Newbury Park
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 2000
Re "Keep It Simple, Set It Free: Much-Maligned Copper Curtain Needs a Tweak, Not a Sledgehammer or an Infusion of Cash," Ventura County Perspective, April 23. As stated in this article, the writer hasn't really read the proposals; all he knows is what he has read in the newspapers. So I offer my proposal for him to read. I do wish city officials had seen through the original artist's vision. He was sold short, for sure. However, at this point to keep it simple and cheap was my main goal.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 8, 1997 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO
The fate of the copper curtain, the oft-ridiculed public artwork on the side of the Civic Arts Plaza, will be the subject of an intensive workshop featuring city leaders, regional artists and the public. The City Council voted unanimously Tuesday to allow the city's Arts Commission to continue discussing alterations to the enigmatic collection of 2,000 copper strips.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 23, 2000 | ROGER KRENKLER, Roger Krenkler lives in Newbury Park
I finally have had it and must put in my two bits' worth about Thousand Oaks' notorious copper curtain. I have been a resident of our fair city for 23 years, if that buys me any credibility. I have to admit that I have only observed the great "refrigerator condenser" debate via various news articles and have not attended any meetings, forums or other public input sessions.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1998 | KATE FOLMAR
The City Council has agreed to add signs to the freeway side of the Civic Arts Plaza and spend up to $100,000 to give the maligned copper curtain sculpture a new look. On a 3-2 vote Tuesday night, Thousand Oaks council members endorsed adding a second sculpture of gnarled oak branches in verdigris copper above the curtain to give it a more appealing look. Councilwomen Linda Parks and Elois Zeanah dissented, saying no more tax dollars should be spent on the sculpture.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1998 | KATE FOLMAR
Hoping to give residents more options for the sculpture this city loves to hate, Councilwoman Elois Zeanah is advocating another public art poll. The subject again would be the copper curtain, the dull-brown sculpture stuck to the side of the Civic Arts Plaza. Residents would again get a chance to call in and state their artistic preferences to city leaders. But this time, residents would be able to choose different options.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 2, 1995
This letter is in reference to your article on the condition of the copper curtain draped on the east wall of the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza. Many people, in mechanical engineering, have had a quiet chuckle over this work of art. But enough is enough. We now have to come to the rescue. I would like to put forward an idea that has been used in industry for many years to keep the luster on copper and brass. Take the curtain down, dip it in a weak solution of acid, somewhat of the strength of vinegar, about 5% to 6% acidity.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 1997 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arguing that one terrible blunder should not be replaced with another, the city's Arts Commission said Thursday night that it needed a legal opinion before considering alterations to the copper curtain, the widely derided public artwork on the side of the Civic Arts Plaza. Commissioners, who have only been given a $10,000 budget to fix the perplexing, radiator-like sculpture, voted unanimously to have City Atty.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 22, 1998 | ANDREW STEVEN HARRIS
Guided by a public phone poll, the City Council is considering three possible design changes for the copper curtain sculpture at the Civic Arts Plaza. At its meeting tonight, the council is expected to refer the three most popular designs to city staff for feasibility and expense review. Voters considered eight options for changes to the series of metal strips hanging from the building's side.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 2, 1998 | AL GRESSLER, Al Gressler was an advertising copy writer until he ran out of exclamation points. He lives in Newbury Park with his wife, Jenny, cat, Buster, and three other cats who refuse to give their right names. He writes short stories, essays and is working on the Great American Novel
Even before the earth-toned stucco dried on the Thousand Oaks Civic Arts Plaza, the decorative exterior copper curtain created a firestorm of controversy: one man's ugly-looking bug zapper being another's highbrow homage to the Performing Arts--which, if memory serves, was a juggling act on the old "Ed Sullivan Show." The controversy continues to this day.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 20, 1998 | KATE FOLMAR
Hoping to give residents more options for the sculpture this city loves to hate, Councilwoman Elois Zeanah is advocating another public art poll. The subject again would be the copper curtain, the dull-brown sculpture stuck to the side of the Civic Arts Plaza. Residents would again get a chance to call in and state their artistic preferences to city leaders. But this time, residents would be able to choose different options.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1998
I'm looking at "Copper Curtain--Your Opinion Counts," published by our city of Thousand Oaks to get feedback from its citizens for a design to salvage the copper curtain. This opportunity for feedback is a joke. Given what we are being offered, my choice is none of the above. We need only to look at the city's Web site for a true option--the complete oak tree, which everyone recognizes as the emblem of our city. Perhaps our decision makers haven't been able to see the tree for the branches?
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