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ENTERTAINMENT
October 12, 2013 | By Robert Hilburn
Johnny Cash's life in the 1960s is mostly remembered as a time of glorious achievement - from the landmark prison albums at Folsom and San Quentin to the launch of the ABC-TV series featuring such guests as Bob Dylan and the Doors that led to his becoming a giant figure in popular culture, a symbol to millions, no less, of the best of American social values. But Cash also experienced excruciatingly dark times in the decade, fueled by drugs and guilt over the breakup of his marriage.
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NEWS
March 31, 2014
Henry Fuhrmann is assistant managing editor for the copy desks and standards at the Los Angeles Times.  Since joining The Times in 1990, Fuhrmann has worked across the newsroom as an editor on the Metro, Foreign, Calendar and Business desks. He served as the first chief of the morning copy desk, established in 2007 to serve latimes.com , before starting his current assignment in March 2009.  Fuhrmann previously worked at Newsday, where he was a member of the first class of copy editors in Times Mirror's Minority Editorial Training Program.
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BUSINESS
December 6, 2012 | By Chris O'Brien
Apple and HTC announced a surprise settlement to their patent litigation last month, but the details were kept tightly under wraps. Then a federal judge this week granted a motion by lawyers for Samsung requesting that they be able to see a copy of the settlement.  Apple complied, and Wednesday night Samsung lawyers filed a copy of that settlement with a U.S. Federal District Court. The 140-page document, however, is heavily redacted.  A copy is pasted below for your early-morning viewing pleasure.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 2014 | By John Horn
Clint Eastwood's "Trouble With the Curve" wasn't a box-office hit, but that hasn't stopped a bitter and costly lawsuit over its authorship. On Monday, a federal judge in Los Angeles will try to determine whether the baseball movie stole more than a base. Former actor Randy Brown tried for years to become a screenwriter. Finally, after almost two decades of thankless effort, he sold a baseball story to Clint Eastwood's production company.  The result was the Warner Bros. feature film "Trouble With the Curve," directed by Eastwood's longtime producing partner, Robert Lorenz, and starring Dirty Harry himself.  PHOTOS: Box office top 10 of 2013  |  Biggest flops of 2013 The film, a critical and commercial washout, grossed just $48.9 million globally.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 10, 2012 | By David C. Nichols
It's doubtful that locals will see anything quite like “Copy” at Theatre of NOTE anytime soon. Padraic Duffy's precocious absurdist exercise is, for much of its length, strangely hilarious. On Naomi Kasahara's copier-dominated set, secretary Betty (fearless Gabby Sanalitro) and Boss (Troy Blendell, edgy yet sensitive) discuss his lunchtime dismay. Tuna isn't what he ordered, so he leaves Betty, who buries her face in the offending sandwich with orgasmic gusto. Only Boss changes his mind, tuna's fine, and hints of pathos appear.
NEWS
May 29, 2013 | By Paul Whitefield
Michele Bachmann isn't going to run for reelection. Plenty of folks are happy about that. I'm one of them. But it's not personal. It's practical. True, Minnesota's Republican representative and one-time GOP presidential contender doesn't get much love from the left. Heck, she doesn't get much love from the middle either. And a quick glance at the comments on stories about her reveal a certain, shall we say, unkindness and lack of respect. But pundits and others adore her because she's always good for a gaffe . Like this one, while campaigning for the Republican presidential nomination in South Carolina on Aug. 16, 2011: “Before we get started, let's all say 'Happy Birthday' to Elvis Presley today.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Carolyn Kellogg
Send your copy of "50 Shades of Grey" to O/R Books and they'll send a book back to you free. If your copy is among the first 50 they receive, they'll send you a free copy of "50 Shades of Louisa May. " "50 Shades of Louisa May" is one of many spoofs of E.L. James' bestselling novel. Like the original, it's sexually explicit. Unlike the original, it stars Louisa May Alcott, author of the beloved novel "Little Women," published in 1868. The publisher writes, "Louisa May Alcott, author of the classic Little Women , consort of Emerson, Thoreau and Hawthorne, beloved icon of professors of American 19th-century literature and perhaps less loved by their legions of students, had a lusty side that was less academic, and more . . . transcendental than any of us knew.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
Ask John Cage in 1956, as the sculptor Richard Lippold did, to make a film and you take your chances.  The composer was adamantly, and with increasing daring, using elaborate chance processes to create all his work. Still, Lippold, who was a close friend and neighbor of Cage, thought the composer would be just the person to edit a mass of footage shot during the three-year process of his making “The Sun,” a huge, geometric sculpture involving more than two miles of pure gold wire and now hanging in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
SPORTS
September 2, 1988
Chics Winning Copy posted a convincing victory in the featured eighth race at Los Alamitos Race Course Thursday night. With Danny Cardoza aboard, Chics Winning Copy ran the 350-yard course in 17.64 seconds, with Kiptillos Phoebe finishing second. Favored Cable Doctor was a close third in the field of seven 3-year-olds. The victory was Cardoza's second of the night.
NEWS
March 3, 1999 | MARTIN MILLER
For most of us, original Van Goghs are a tad pricey. The Dutch artist's "Portrait of the Artist Without His Beard" sold at auction for more than $71 million last year. Now, thanks to the miracle of modern forging techniques, you can still bring home a pretty darned good copy of one of the world's greatest paintings at an affordable price. The Carlyle Collection, whose works are on display in San Diego and New York, offers many famous pieces at greatly reduced prices. The cost? Just $268 to $798.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Beverly Boulevard is awash in meta-ism today. In addition to Shia LaBeouf's so-called art installation - a plagiarized play on plagiarism itself, which has been prattling on since Tuesday morning at Cohen Gallery - now actor Jerry O'Connell has set up an art installation of his own, a spoof coordinated by Funny or Die directly next door, mocking LaBeouf. Whereas LaBeouf's art-apology, “IAMSORRY,” is riffing on artist Marina Abramovic's 2010 MoMA piece “The Artist Is Present,” O'Connell's #IAMSORRYTOO is riffing on LaBeouf's riffing of Abramovic.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 2014 | By John Horn
George Clooney and Grant Heslov describe themselves as two of the least cynical people in Hollywood. But when the longtime collaborators looked back at their recent work, they realized the movies had an unshakable gloom: "The Ides of March," "Good Night, and Good Luck," "The American" and "August: Osage County" were hardly films that made you feel better about the world. So Clooney and Heslov decided to change course and put together a crowd-pleasing tale. The resulting work, Friday's "The Monuments Men," is a curious departure for the filmmakers - a sometimes lighthearted account of a largely untold chapter of World War II history that recalls some of the less serious movies about the conflict.
NATIONAL
January 25, 2014 | By Saba Hamedy
George Zimmerman's latest artistic endeavor may land him in a legal battle with the Associated Press. AP officials contend that Zimmerman's painting, titled "Angie," directly copies an AP photo, taken by freelance photographer Rick Wilson, of Florida State Atty. Angela Corey, who prosecuted Zimmerman for the 2012 shooting death of 17-year-old Trayvon Martin. Zimmerman, who was acquitted last year of second-degree murder in Martin's death, auctioned off his first painting, a signed, 18-by-24-inch blue American flag featuring a part of the Pledge of Allegiance, on EBay for $100,099.99 last month.
NATIONAL
January 9, 2014 | By Ken Dilanian and Richard A. Serrano
WASHINGTON - A classified Pentagon report concludes that leaks by former National Security Agency contractor Edward Snowden have set back U.S. efforts against terrorism, cybercrime, human trafficking and weapons proliferation, leaders of the House Intelligence Committee say. A damage assessment by the Defense Intelligence Agency indicates most of the estimated 1.7 million classified documents that officials say Snowden copied from NSA computers involve...
BUSINESS
January 6, 2014 | By Jon Healey
For the third year in a row, Dish Network announced at the Consumer Electronics Show a product that gives TV viewers yet more control over the shows that are beamed into their homes. This time, though, the company isn't likely to draw a lawsuit from the major TV networks. The product in question is the Super Joey, a set top box that works in conjunction with Dish's Hopper digital video recorder. Think of the Hopper as the living room's set top and the Super Joey as an extension for the bedroom or the kitchen.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 2013 | By Mark Swed, Music Critic
Ask John Cage in 1956, as the sculptor Richard Lippold did, to make a film and you take your chances.  The composer was adamantly, and with increasing daring, using elaborate chance processes to create all his work. Still, Lippold, who was a close friend and neighbor of Cage, thought the composer would be just the person to edit a mass of footage shot during the three-year process of his making “The Sun,” a huge, geometric sculpture involving more than two miles of pure gold wire and now hanging in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.
NEWS
June 5, 1988 | From United Press International
An Anaheim man and his brother-in-law pleaded guilty to selling counterfeit copies of a priceless Jewish text to a couple of Brooklyn collectors, court records showed Friday. The two men, Gabriel Reguer, 49, of Anaheim and his brother-in-law, Raphael Podde, 45, of Woodmere, N.Y., pleaded guilty Thursday in U.S. District Court in Brooklyn to selling fake copies of the Guadalajara Haggada. The surprise pleas came just after the prosecutor made opening statements in the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 21, 2012 | By Stephen Ceasar, Los Angeles Times
A reporter at the Mustang Daily — the student newspaper at Cal Poly San Luis Obispo — wanted a copy of an email for a story. He filed a California Public Records Act request with the chancellor's office in Long Beach but he didn't get it. Why? University officials said that although Sean McMinn's request fell under the law, he would have to pay 20 cents — by check — to have the email forwarded to him. McMinn was working on a story about the university system reminding professors that it was inappropriate and, in some cases, illegal to inform students about how politics, specifically Gov. Jerry Brown's Proposition 30 tax measure, would affect the Cal State system.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2013 | Elaine Woo
In the 1970s, Syd Field's job in Hollywood was reading scripts all day and picking out the gems that might make it to the screen. In one two-year period he figured he read 2,000 screenplays - and turned down 1,960 of them. The rejects were an "amorphous goo" of confusing plot lines and poorly developed characters that often caused him to close his office door at 2 or 3 in the afternoon and go to sleep. But eventually he figured out what distinguished the winners from the losers. The answer was crystallized in "Screenplay, The Foundations of Screenwriting," Field's 1979 bestseller that today remains the bible of scriptwriters.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 2013 | By Sharon Mizota
In the first of a series of collaborative exhibitions at Commonwealth & Council, Anna Mayer and Rosha Yaghmai were inspired by the diaries of the 19th century Swiss explorer and writer, Isabelle Eberhardt. Born in 1877, Eberhardt flaunted convention by traveling and living in North Africa, where she converted to Islam and dressed as a man. She died no less spectacularly in a flash flood at the age of 27. Mayer and Yaghmai are less concerned with the fascinating details of Eberhardt's life, however, than with the principles it embodied: a hunger for direct experience and a disregard for conventional boundaries.
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